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618 full-text articles. Page 13 of 13.

Cute Prickly Critter With Presbyopia, Donald J. Herzog 2012 University of Michigan Law School

Cute Prickly Critter With Presbyopia, Donald J. Herzog

Reviews

Ronald Dworkin's' latest, long-awaited, and most ambitious book is a puzzle. Truth in advertising first: despite the title, this isn't centrally a book about justice. It's a book about the realm of value-all of that realm. Dworkin is most interested here in morality, but really touches on all of it, as a matter of the application of the abstract argument and sometimes in black and white right on the page, from aesthetics to prudence to morality to politics to law to . . . . It's fun to read, also frustrating. It stretches out lazily in handling some issues but ...


The Landsafe Socioecological Development Model For The Customary Commons Of Zambia: Evolution And Formalization, I.P.A. Manning 2012 University of New Mexico

The Landsafe Socioecological Development Model For The Customary Commons Of Zambia: Evolution And Formalization, I.P.A. Manning

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Implementation Of The Arizona Water Settlement Act In New Mexico: An Overview Of Legal Considerations, Adrian Oglesby 2012 University of New Mexico-Main Campus

Implementation Of The Arizona Water Settlement Act In New Mexico: An Overview Of Legal Considerations, Adrian Oglesby

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


Planning For Legality, Jeremy Waldron 2011 New York University School of Law

Planning For Legality, Jeremy Waldron

Michigan Law Review

What is law like? What can we compare it with in order to illuminate its character and suggest answers to some of the perennial questions of jurisprudence? Natural lawyers compare laws to moral propositions. A human law is an attempt by someone who has responsibility for a human community to replicate, publicize, and enforce a proposition of objective morality such as "Killing is wrong." Law is like moral reasoning, say the natural lawyers, and laws should be regarded as principles of right reason (principles that reason dictates as answers to the moral questions that need to be addressed in human ...


Justice For Hedgehogs, Robert Rodes 2011 Notre Dame Law School

Justice For Hedgehogs, Robert Rodes

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Equality And Differences, John M. Finnis 2011 Notre Dame Law School

Equality And Differences, John M. Finnis

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Punctuated Equilibrium: A Model For Administrative Evolution, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 353 (2011), Mark C. Niles 2011 John Marshall Law School

Punctuated Equilibrium: A Model For Administrative Evolution, 44 J. Marshall L. Rev. 353 (2011), Mark C. Niles

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Separation Of Law And State, Talia Fisher 2010 Tel Aviv University Law School

Separation Of Law And State, Talia Fisher

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

In the framework of the jurisprudential literature, the law-state bond is assumed as a given. Points of dispute emerge only at more advanced stages of the discussion, with respect to such questions as the duty to obey state law or the appropriate extent of state intervention in social relations. This Article will be devoted to a reconsideration of the presupposition of the law-state link and to challenging the state's status vis-à-vis the law-both in its role as the producer of legal norms and its capacity as the arbiter of disputes.

The Article opens with a comparative elucidation of the ...


Equity In Policy: Failure And Opportunity, Henry Vaux Jr. 2010 University of New Mexico

Equity In Policy: Failure And Opportunity, Henry Vaux Jr.

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


A Planet By Any Other Name…, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan 2010 Rutgers University, School of Law - Camden

A Planet By Any Other Name…, Kimberly Kessler Ferzan

Michigan Law Review

In case you haven't heard, Pluto isn't a planet anymore (and maybe it never was). In grade school, we all memorized the planets, giving little thought to what made something a planet besides revolving around the Sun and being part of some familiar mnemonic. However, scientific discoveries about Pluto and other parts of space led scientists to question Pluto's planetary status and ultimately, to strip Pluto of its standing among the planets. This leads to the inevitable question-what is a planet?-which turns out to be a more difficult and fascinating question than one might think. The ...


The Rule Of Law: Its History And Meaning In Common Law, Civil Law, And Latin American Judicial Systems, Nadia E. Nedzel 2010 University of Richmond

The Rule Of Law: Its History And Meaning In Common Law, Civil Law, And Latin American Judicial Systems, Nadia E. Nedzel

Richmond Journal of Global Law & Business

“Rule of law” is an expression both praised and ridiculed by adherents of opposite political philosophies, and it is a principle claimed as the lodestar for widely differing legal theories. As much as an ideality as an ideal, the words “rule of law” have served a wide range of purposes, stretching from political sloganeering to the protection of individual rights from the power of government.


Is The Failure To Respond Appropriately To A Natural Disaster A Crime Against Humanity - The Responsibility To Protect And Individual Criminal Responsibility In The Aftermath Of Cyclone Nargis, 38 Denv. J. Int'l L. & Pol'y 227 (2010), Stuart K. Ford 2010 The John Marshall Law School, Chicago

Is The Failure To Respond Appropriately To A Natural Disaster A Crime Against Humanity - The Responsibility To Protect And Individual Criminal Responsibility In The Aftermath Of Cyclone Nargis, 38 Denv. J. Int'l L. & Pol'y 227 (2010), Stuart K. Ford

Faculty Scholarship

On May 2 and 3, 2008, Cyclone Nargis struck Myanmar, devastating large portions of the Irrawaddy Delta and creating the potential for a massive humanitarian crisis. Yet, the Myanmar government rejected aid from some countries, limited the amount of aid entering the country to a fraction of what was needed, and strictly controlled how that aid was distributed The United Nations and many governments criticized Myanmar's response to the Cyclone as inadequate and inhumane, and senior politicians from a number of countries discussed whether the situation justified invoking the "responsibility to protect" doctrine This article explores several questions, including ...


Fiftieth Anniversary Note: A Devoted Reader's Appreciation Of The Natural Resources Journal, A. Dan Tarlock 2010 University of New Mexico

Fiftieth Anniversary Note: A Devoted Reader's Appreciation Of The Natural Resources Journal, A. Dan Tarlock

Natural Resources Journal

No abstract provided.


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