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American Airpower In The 21st Century: Reconciling Strategic Imperatives With Economic Realities, Charles J. Dunlap Jr. 2010 Duke Law School

American Airpower In The 21st Century: Reconciling Strategic Imperatives With Economic Realities, Charles J. Dunlap Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

“Vexing” is certainly the right word to describe the state of resource allocation in the national security community. Despite still sizable defense budgets, serious economic constraints combine with a wide range of complicated threats to create extremely difficult choices for policy makers. To help them work through the decision-making process, Congress mandates Quadrennial Defense Reviews (QDRs). QDRs “are intended to guide the services in making resource allocation decisions when developing future budgets.” The 2010 QDR rightly insists that “America’s interests and role in the world require armed forces with unmatched capabilities.”6 Recent resource decisions, however, do not provide ...


A Dark Descent Into Reality: Making The Case For An Objective Definition Of Torture, Michael Lewis 2009 Ohio Northern University

A Dark Descent Into Reality: Making The Case For An Objective Definition Of Torture, Michael Lewis

Michael W. Lewis

The definition of torture is broken. The malleability of the term “severe pain or suffering” at the heart of the definition has created a situation in which the world agrees on the words but cannot agree on their meaning. The “I know it when I see it” nature of the discussion of torture makes it clear that the definition is largely left to the eye of the beholder. This is particularly problematic when international law’s reliance on self-enforcement is considered. After discussing current common misconceptions about intelligence gathering and coercion that are common to all sides of the torture ...


Habeas And (Non-)Delegation, Paul Diller 2009 Willamette University

Habeas And (Non-)Delegation, Paul Diller

Paul Diller

No abstract provided.


A Dark Descent Into Reality: The Case For An Objective Definition Of Torture, Michael Lewis 2009 Ohio Northern University

A Dark Descent Into Reality: The Case For An Objective Definition Of Torture, Michael Lewis

Michael W. Lewis

Abstract The definition of torture is broken. The malleability of the term “severe pain or suffering” at the heart of the definition has created a situation in which the world agrees on the words but cannot agree on their meaning. The “I know it when I see it” nature of the discussion of torture makes it clear that the definition is largely left to the eye of the beholder. This is particularly problematic when international law’s reliance on self-enforcement is considered. After discussing current common misconceptions about intelligence gathering and coercion that are common to all sides of the ...


Jfk, Berlin, And The Berlin Crises, 1961-63, Robert Waite 2009 Research Center Resistance History German Resistance Memorial Center

Jfk, Berlin, And The Berlin Crises, 1961-63, Robert Waite

Robert G. Waite

Already before his inauguration, JFK began to focus on Berlin and the tension with the Soviet block over the status of this divided city. While President, JFK took forceful steps to reassure our allies and the American public that this nation stood by the post-war settlement. The handling of the crises that flared up reveal much about JFK's art of diplomacy and style of leadership.


The Dangers Of Dissent: The Fbi And Civil Liberties Since 1965, Ivan Greenberg 2009 independent scholar

The Dangers Of Dissent: The Fbi And Civil Liberties Since 1965, Ivan Greenberg

Ivan Greenberg

While most studies of the FBI focus on the long tenure of Director J. Edgar Hoover (1924-1972), The Dangers of Dissent shifts the ground to the recent past. The book examines FBI practices in the domestic security field through the prism of "political policing." The monitoring of dissent is exposed, as are the Bureau's controversial "counterintelligence" operations designed to disrupt political activity. This book reveals that attacks on civil liberties focus on a wide range of domestic critics on both the Left and the Right. This book traces the evolution of FBI spying from 1965 to the present through ...


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