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8,816 full-text articles. Page 142 of 184.

2011-2012 Legislative Summary, Assembly Local Government Committee 2012 Golden Gate University School of Law

2011-2012 Legislative Summary, Assembly Local Government Committee

California Assembly

No abstract provided.


Joint Legislative Audit Committee: 2011-12 End Of Session Report, Joint Legislative Audit Committee 2012 Golden Gate University School of Law

Joint Legislative Audit Committee: 2011-12 End Of Session Report, Joint Legislative Audit Committee

California Joint Committees

No abstract provided.


The Use Of Federal Law To Curb Excessive Executive Compensation: Lessons In Past Failures And Lessons For The Future, 57 Vill. L. Rev. 551 (2012), Kathryn J. Kennedy 2012 John Marshall Law School

The Use Of Federal Law To Curb Excessive Executive Compensation: Lessons In Past Failures And Lessons For The Future, 57 Vill. L. Rev. 551 (2012), Kathryn J. Kennedy

Faculty Scholarship

When one thinks of the use of legislative power to curb the size and the type of compensation paid to executives, one normally thinks such power is reserved to the states. That is, one tends to think that regulating corporate governance falls within traditional state police powers. However, while state courts have been willing to review the processes boards of directors use in setting the size and type of executive compensation, they have been less willing to review the actual results of such decisions. Hence, it is no shock that Congress continues to dabble in the area of corporate governance ...


Cyber Risk: How The 2011 Sony Data Breach And The Need For Cyber Risk Insurance Policies Should Direct The Federal Response To Rising Data Breaches, Lance Bonner 2012 Washington University School of Law

Cyber Risk: How The 2011 Sony Data Breach And The Need For Cyber Risk Insurance Policies Should Direct The Federal Response To Rising Data Breaches, Lance Bonner

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

In 2011, a number of high profile data breaches made national news. Companies such as Epsilon Data Management and Nasdaq experienced data breaches that posed serious risks to their business operations. Total data loss incidents numbered in the hundreds, and multiple incidents involved millions of records.

Of all the data breaches in 2011, the string of data breaches that plagued Sony Corporation were arguably the most high profile. Sony made headlines for breaches of its Playstation Network and Qiocity services in April as hackers accessed Sony‘s clients‘ personal information.

As news spread of the mounting data breaches hitting Sony ...


Legislative Supremacy, Kenneth Ward 2012 Texas State University

Legislative Supremacy, Kenneth Ward

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This essay develops an institutional perspective to consider limitations on judicial authority. Rather than assume that judicial decisions put an end to disagreements about what the Constitution means, this perspective focuses on the political contests that occur after judges make disputed interpretations of constitutional law. This perspective shows that scholars both exaggerate the role of judicial review in enforcing constitutional limits and underestimate the political instability that follows from difficulty in challenging controversial judicial holdings. Together, these claims are the beginning of an argument defending a form of legislative supremacy that would allow Congress and the President to override judicial ...


No Contact Parole Restrictions: Unconstitutional And Counterproductive, Sharon Brett 2012 University of Michigan Law School

No Contact Parole Restrictions: Unconstitutional And Counterproductive, Sharon Brett

Michigan Journal of Gender and Law

Although what Jesse Timmendequas did was abhorrent, the legislation enacted in the wake of his crime went far beyond making sure we know the pedophiles or pedophile-murderers living in our neighborhoods. Megan's name now lends itself to a host of state laws requiring the state to notify neighbors when a sex offender moves into the neighborhood. The term "sex offender" is intentionally broad, covering everyone from voyeurs and exhibitionists to rapists and child molesters. Yet, Megan's Laws treat them the same way, ignoring some crucial questions: Are all sex offenders alike? Are they all monsters? In reality, the ...


Clarification Needed: Fixing The Jurisdiction And Venue Clarification Act, William Baude 2012 Stanford Law School

Clarification Needed: Fixing The Jurisdiction And Venue Clarification Act, William Baude

Michigan Law Review First Impressions

One hates to seem ungrateful. Judges and scholars frequently call for Congress to fix problems in the law of jurisdiction and procedure, and Congress doesn't usually intervene. In that light, the Jurisdiction and Venue Clarification Act ("JVCA"),[1] signed into law on December 7, 2011, ought to be a welcome improvement. And hopefully, on balance, it will be. But in at least one area that it attempts to clarify, the JVCA leaves much to be desired. Professor Arthur Hellman has called the JVCA "the most far-reaching package of revisions to the Judicial Code since the Judicial Improvements Act of ...


Deruglatory Riders Redux, Thomas O, McGarity 2012 University of Texas School of Law

Deruglatory Riders Redux, Thomas O, Mcgarity

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

Soon after the 2010 elections placed the Republican Party in control of the House of Representatives, the House took up a number of deregulatory bills. Recognizing that deregulatory legislation had little chance of passing the Senate, which remained under the control of the Democratic Party, or of being signed by President Obama, the House leadership reprised a strategy adopted by the Republican leaders during the 104th Congress in the 1990s. The deregulatory provisions were attached as riders to much-needed legislation in an attempt to force the Senate and the President to accept the deregulatory riders to avoid the adverse consequences ...


Is A Substantive, Non-Positivist United States Environmental Law Possible?, Dan Tarlock 2012 Chicago-Kent College of Law

Is A Substantive, Non-Positivist United States Environmental Law Possible?, Dan Tarlock

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

U.S. environmental law is almost exclusively positive and procedural. The foundation is the pollution control and biodiversity conservation statutes enacted primarily between 1969–1980 and judicial decisions interpreting them. This law has created detailed processes for making decisions but has produced few substantive constraints on private and public decisions which impair the environment. Several substantive candidates have been proposed, such as the common law, a constitutional right to a healthy environment, the public trust, and the extension of rights to fauna and flora. However, these candidates have not produced the hoped for substantive law. Many argue that a substantive ...


Interpretive Divergence All The Way Down: A Response To Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl And Ethan J. Leib, Elected Judges And Statutory Interpretation, 79 U Chi L Rev 1215 (2012), Anita S. Krishnakumar 2012 St. John's University - New York

Interpretive Divergence All The Way Down: A Response To Aaron-Andrew P. Bruhl And Ethan J. Leib, Elected Judges And Statutory Interpretation, 79 U Chi L Rev 1215 (2012), Anita S. Krishnakumar

Faculty Publications

This article is a response to the law review article cited in its title. It focuses on a corollary question raised by the article's analysis: if one takes seriously the proposition that it may make sense for elected judges to interpret statutes differently than do appointed judges, should judicial opinions written by elected judges look substantially different from those written by appointed judges? Part I examines the relative roles of judicial opinions written by elected versus appointed judges in a world in which divergence is practiced. Part II explores specific ways in which we might want or expect an ...


The Anti-Messiness Principle In Statutory Interpretation, Anita S. Krishnakumar 2012 St. John's University - New York

The Anti-Messiness Principle In Statutory Interpretation, Anita S. Krishnakumar

Faculty Publications

Many of the Supreme Court's statutory interpretation opinions reflect a juisprudential aversion to interpreting statutes in a manner that will prove "messy" for implementing courts to administer. Yet the practice of construing statutes to avoid "messiness" has gone largely unnoticed in the statutory interpretation literature. This Article seeks to illuminate the Court's use of "anti-messiness" arguments to interpret statutes and to bring theoretical attention to the principle of "messiness" avoidance. The Article begins by defining the concept of anti-messiness and providing a typology of common anti-messiness arguments used by the Supreme Court. It then considers some dangers inherent ...


Political Hot Potato: How Closing Loopholes Can Get Policymakers Cooked, Stephanie McMahon 2012 University of Cincinnati College of Law

Political Hot Potato: How Closing Loopholes Can Get Policymakers Cooked, Stephanie Mcmahon

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

Loopholes in the law are weaknesses that allow the law to be circumvented. Once created, they prove hard to eliminate. Acase study of the evolving tax unit used in the federal income tax explores policymakers' response to loopholes. The1913 income tax created an opportunity for wealthy married couples to shift ownership of family income between spouses, then to file separately, and, as a result, to reduce their collective taxes. In 1948, Congress closed this loophole by extending the income-splitting benefit to all married taxpayers filing jointly. Congress acted only after the federal judiciary and Treasury Department pleaded for congressional ...


Thinking Like A Lawyer Abroad: Putting Justice Into Legal Reasoning, James Maxeiner 2012 University of Baltimore School of Law

Thinking Like A Lawyer Abroad: Putting Justice Into Legal Reasoning, James Maxeiner

All Faculty Scholarship

Americans are taking new interest in legal reasoning. Thinking Like a Lawyer: A New Introduction to Legal Reasoning by Professor Frederick Schauer suggests why. According to Schauer, American legal methods often require decision-makers “to do something other than the right thing.” There has got to be a better way.

Now comes a book that offers Americans opportunities to look into a world where legal methods help decision-makers do the right thing. According to Reinhard Zippelius in his newly published Introduction to German Legal Methods, German legal methods help decision makers resolve legal problems “in a just and equitable manner.”

This ...


Medical Marijuana: A Study Of Unintended Consequences, Gerald Caplan 2012 Pacific McGeorge School of Law

Medical Marijuana: A Study Of Unintended Consequences, Gerald Caplan

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Reproductive Freedom And Virginia's 2012 General Assembly Session, Katherine Greenier 2012 University of Richmond

Reproductive Freedom And Virginia's 2012 General Assembly Session, Katherine Greenier

Richmond Journal of Law and the Public Interest

While the Governor approved H.B. 462, the mandatory ultrasound bill, H.B. 62, H.B. 1285, and S.B. 637 failed in the General Assembly.37 As introduced this 2012 session, H.B. 1 contained different bill language than the prior years it has been introduced. H.B. 62, H.B. 1285, and S.B. 637 were new bills, not seen in past years. An analysis and overview of these measures sheds light on the increasing attempts and the tactics used by legislators to undermine reproductive freedom.


The New Section 1202 Tax-Free Business Sale: Congress Rewards Small Businesses That Survived The Great Recession, Beckett G. Cantley 2012 Fordham Law School

The New Section 1202 Tax-Free Business Sale: Congress Rewards Small Businesses That Survived The Great Recession, Beckett G. Cantley

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

On September 27, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Creating Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 (“SBJA”) that contains a temporary amendment to Internal Revenue Code (“IRC”) § 1202. The amendment permits original shareholders of eligible corporation stock to sell the stock without being taxed on the sale. The temporary amendment initially only applied to certain stock acquired after the enactment of the SBJA and before January 1, 2011, but the amendment was extended on December 17, 2010 for another year ending January 1, 2012. With the impending sunset of the 15% capital gains rate at the end of 2012, this ...


Bay Area Air Management Quality District 2012 Annual Report, Bay Area Air Management Quality District 2012 Golden Gate University School of Law

Bay Area Air Management Quality District 2012 Annual Report, Bay Area Air Management Quality District

California Agencies

No abstract provided.


Religion And The Equal Protection Clause, Steven G. Calabresi, Abe Salander 2012 Northwestern University School of Law

Religion And The Equal Protection Clause, Steven G. Calabresi, Abe Salander

Faculty Working Papers

This article argues that state action that discriminates on the basis of religion is unconstitutional under the Equal Protection Doctrine even if it does not violate the Establishment Clause or the Free Exercise Clause as incorporated by the Fourteenth Amendment. State action that discriminates on the basis of religion should be subject to strict scrutiny and should almost always be held unconstitutional. We thus challenge the Supreme Court's recent decision in Christian Legal Society v. Martinez in which a 5 to 4 majority of the Court wrongly allowed a California state school to discriminate against a Christian Legal Society ...


Comparison Of Chinese And U.S. Patent Reform Legislation: Which, If Either, Got It Right?, 11 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 567 (2012), Wayne C. Jaeschke, Zhun Lu, Paul Crawford 2012 John Marshall Law School

Comparison Of Chinese And U.S. Patent Reform Legislation: Which, If Either, Got It Right?, 11 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 567 (2012), Wayne C. Jaeschke, Zhun Lu, Paul Crawford

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

Chinese patent law has a short history whereas the United States ("U.S.") system has a more robust history. This article chronicles important remaining differences between Chinese and U.S. patent laws including the utility model successfully employed at State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China ("SIPO") and in the Chinese courts, but not available under U.S. law. Some differences are discussed in regard of patent appeals, reexaminations for invalidity, China’s lack of a reissue process to correct major errors, China’s inventors remuneration process and compulsory licensing of patents, and China’s unique ...


Why The Initiative Process Is The Wrong Way To Go: Lessons We Should Have Learned From Proposition 215, Michael Vitiello 2012 Pacific McGeorge School of Law

Why The Initiative Process Is The Wrong Way To Go: Lessons We Should Have Learned From Proposition 215, Michael Vitiello

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


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