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A Bibliography Of Faculty Scholarship, Law Library 2018 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

A Bibliography Of Faculty Scholarship, Law Library

Scholarly Articles and Other Contributions

The purpose of this bibliography is to record in one place the substantial body of scholarship produced by the current faculty at the Catholic University, Columbus School of Law. From its humble beginnings under the tutelage of founding Dean William Callyhan Robinson, through its adolescent period when, like so many other American law schools, it was trying to define its pedagogical niche, to its eventual merger with the Columbus University Law School in 1954, the law school at Catholic University has always retained a scholarly and remarkably productive faculty. The sheer quantity of writing, the breadth of research and the ...


Collected Works, December 1, 2017, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Collected Works, December 1, 2017, University Of Michigan Law School

Newsletters

Collected Works is a summary of faculty activities, publications, and news that has been collected in the last two weeks. Collected Works comprises information culled from a variety of sources, but most heavily relies on information submitted directly by faculty.


Irlafarc! Surveying The Language Of Legal Writing, Terrill Pollman, Judith M. Stinson 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Irlafarc! Surveying The Language Of Legal Writing, Terrill Pollman, Judith M. Stinson

Maine Law Review

Language, like law, is a living thing. It grows and changes. It both reflects and shapes the communities that use it. The language of the community of legal writing professors demonstrates this process. Legal writing professors, who stand at the heart of an emerging discipline in the legal academy, are creating new terms, or neologisms, as they struggle to articulate principles of legal analysis, organizational paradigms conventional to legal writing, and other legal writing concepts. This new vocabulary can be both beneficial and detrimental. It can be beneficial because it expands the substance of an emerging discipline. It also can ...


Content And Quality Of Legal Information And Data On The Internet With A Special Focus On The United States, Claire M. Germain 2017 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Content And Quality Of Legal Information And Data On The Internet With A Special Focus On The United States, Claire M. Germain

Claire Germain

In the United States today, digital versions of current decisions, bills, statutes, and regulations issued by federal and state governments are widely available on publicly accessible Web sites. Worldwide, official (defined as "authoritative," or "the official" word of the law) legal information issued by international organizations and foreign governments is also becoming available on the Web. However, there are currently no standards for the production and authentication of digital documents. Moreover, the information is sometimes available only for a short time and then disappears from the site. No guidelines exist either to promote a uniform way to cite to digital ...


Aall's National Advocacy Efforts, Claire M. Germain 2017 Cornell Law School

Aall's National Advocacy Efforts, Claire M. Germain

Claire Germain

No abstract provided.


Collected Works, November 17, 2017, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Collected Works, November 17, 2017, University Of Michigan Law School

Newsletters

Collected Works is a summary of faculty activities, publications, and news that has been collected in the last two weeks. Collected Works comprises information culled from a variety of sources, but most heavily relies on information submitted directly by faculty.


Collected Works, November 3, 2017, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Collected Works, November 3, 2017, University Of Michigan Law School

Newsletters

Collected Works is a summary of faculty activities, publications, and news that has been collected in the last two weeks. Collected Works comprises information culled from a variety of sources, but most heavily relies on information submitted directly by faculty.


Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Law Library Blog (November 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Collected Works, October 20, 2017, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Collected Works, October 20, 2017, University Of Michigan Law School

Newsletters

Collected Works is a summary of faculty activities, publications, and news that has been collected in the last two weeks. Collected Works comprises information culled from a variety of sources, but most heavily relies on information submitted directly by faculty.


Access To Justice Starts In The Library: The Importance Of Competent Research Skills And Free/Low-Cost Research Resources, Deborah K. Hackerson 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Access To Justice Starts In The Library: The Importance Of Competent Research Skills And Free/Low-Cost Research Resources, Deborah K. Hackerson

Maine Law Review

Access to justice is an important aspirational goal for everyone in the legal profession. Lawyers, however, cannot provide access to justice without adequate practical skills and the tools necessary to complete their work. Lawyers and law students provide many hours of public and pro bono service every year. With the current state of the economy and the record jobless rate, it is likely that the need for low cost and free legal services will continue to grow. In order to carry out the mission of continuing to provide services to those in need, law students must prepare learn the practical ...


Framing Failure In The Legal Classroom: Techniques For Encouraging Growth And Resilience, Kaci Bishop 2017 University of North Carolina School of Law

Framing Failure In The Legal Classroom: Techniques For Encouraging Growth And Resilience, Kaci Bishop

Working Papers

This Article argues that law schools should endeavor to help students maximize their learning and their potential as attorneys by helping them accept and learn from failure.


Proquest Regulatory Insight, Pamela C. Brannon 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

Proquest Regulatory Insight, Pamela C. Brannon

Pamela Brannon

No abstract provided.


Legalish, Curtis E.A. Karnow 2017 California Superior Court (San Francisco)

Legalish, Curtis E.A. Karnow

Curtis E.A. Karnow

The article urges plain English writing, and suggests abandoning words and phrases only used in the legal world.  Clarity and simplicity not only benefit judges but also enfranchises the lay public, which the legal system is meant to serve.


The Structured Writing Group: A Different Writing Center?, Brian N. Larson, Christopher Soper 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

The Structured Writing Group: A Different Writing Center?, Brian N. Larson, Christopher Soper

Brian Larson

This article describes the objectives, development, and some preliminary results of a program the authors led at the University of Minnesota Law School in academic year 2014-15. They wanted the “Structured Writing Group” (SWG) project to achieve some outcomes traditionally associated with writing centers: first, improving the student writing process by facilitating collaboration with a writing expert; and second, exposing students to additional audiences for their writing. We added a third goal of improving the experience and performance of multilingual students in the legal writing program.


Collected Works, October 6, 2017, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Collected Works, October 6, 2017, University Of Michigan Law School

Newsletters

Collected Works is a summary of faculty activities, publications, and news that has been collected in the last two weeks. Collected Works comprises information culled from a variety of sources, but most heavily relies on information submitted directly by faculty.


Encouraging Engaged Scholarship: Perspectives From An Associate Dean For Research, Sonia K. Katyal 2017 Selected Works

Encouraging Engaged Scholarship: Perspectives From An Associate Dean For Research, Sonia K. Katyal

Sonia Katyal

No abstract provided.


Book Review - Florida Legal Research: Sources, Process, And Analysis, A. Darby Dickerson 2017 Stetson University College of Law

Book Review - Florida Legal Research: Sources, Process, And Analysis, A. Darby Dickerson

Darby Dickerson

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (October 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Law Library Blog (October 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Legal-Writing Exercises: Part Iv, Gerald Lebovits 2017 Columbia, Fordham & NYU Law Schools

Legal-Writing Exercises: Part Iv, Gerald Lebovits

Hon. Gerald Lebovits

No abstract provided.


Integrity & Incentives: Seeking Equity In Historic Preservation Law, Anneka Olson 2017 University of Washington Tacoma

Integrity & Incentives: Seeking Equity In Historic Preservation Law, Anneka Olson

Access*: Interdisciplinary Journal of Student Research and Scholarship

In this article, the author presents a case study of mobile home park residents seeking historic designation in the face of neighborhood demolition. The neighborhood’s ineligibility to become a historic site under current law can help demonstrate larger patterns of inequitable outcomes within historic preservation practice. In particular, the author argues that the application of preservation law—despite being formally neutral regarding issues of racial and socioeconomic equity—reinforces existing racial, economic, and spatial inequities. Drawing on the challenge of legal closure from critical legal studies (CLS), the author argues that law and historicity are mutually constituting, and that ...


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