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Flipping The Script On Brady, Ion Meyn 2020 University of Wisconsin - Madison

Flipping The Script On Brady, Ion Meyn

Indiana Law Journal

Brady v. Maryland imposes a disclosure obligation on the prosecutor and, for this

reason, is understood to burden the prosecutor. This Article asks whether Brady also

benefits the prosecutor, and if so, how and to what extent does it accomplish this?

This Article first considers Brady’s structural impact—how the case influenced

broader dynamics of litigation. Before Brady, legislative reform transformed civil

and criminal litigation by providing pretrial information to civil defendants but not

to criminal defendants. Did this disparate treatment comport with due process?

Brady arguably answered this question by brokering a compromise: in exchange for

imposing minor ...


Men's Reproductive Rights: A Legal History, Mary Ziegler 2020 Pepperdine University

Men's Reproductive Rights: A Legal History, Mary Ziegler

Pepperdine Law Review

This Article offers the first legal history of men’s procreative rights, filling a gap in scholarship on assisted reproduction, constitutional law, and social movements. A rich literature addresses women’s procreative rights in contexts from abortion to infertility. By comparison, we know relatively little about the history of the debate about reproductive rights for men. This void is particularly troubling at a time when the law of reproductive rights is increasingly up for grabs, especially in the context of assisted reproduction technologies (ART). Men’s rights advocates—and the abortion-rights supporters responding to them—championed a jurisprudential approach to ...


Felony Disenfranchisement And The Nineteenth Amendment, Michael Gentithes 2020 The University of Akron

Felony Disenfranchisement And The Nineteenth Amendment, Michael Gentithes

Akron Law Review

The Nineteenth Amendment and the history of the women’s suffrage movement can offer a compelling argument against felony disenfranchisement laws. These laws leave approximately six million citizens unable to vote, often for crimes wholly unrelated to the political process. They also increasingly threaten gains in female enfranchisement.

Today’s arguments in support of felony disenfranchisement laws bear striking similarities to the arguments of anti-suffragists more than a century earlier. Both suggest that a traditionally subordinated class of citizens is inherently incapable of bearing the responsibility that the right to vote entails, and that their votes are somehow less worthy ...


The Nineteenth Amendment And The U.S. "Women's Emancipation Policy" In Post-World War Ii Occupied Japan: Going Beyond Suffrage, Cornelia Weiss 2020 The University of Akron

The Nineteenth Amendment And The U.S. "Women's Emancipation Policy" In Post-World War Ii Occupied Japan: Going Beyond Suffrage, Cornelia Weiss

Akron Law Review

This paper explores the influence of the Nineteenth Amendment on U.S. military occupation policy in Post-World War II Japan. A mere 25 years after the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, actions taken during the military occupation did not stop at suffrage for Japanese women. Actions included a constitution that provided for women’s “equality” (what, even 100 years after the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, is still absent in the U.S. constitution). In addition to addressing women’s suffrage and constitutional equality, this paper examines the successes and failures of the Occupation to eradicate the legal enslavement of ...


The Temperance Movement's Impact On Adoption Of Women's Suffrage, Richard H. Chused 2020 The University of Akron

The Temperance Movement's Impact On Adoption Of Women's Suffrage, Richard H. Chused

Akron Law Review

This paper examines the nature of the Progressive Era and the Prohibition Movement and the important links between the sentiments giving rise to prohibition and those stimulating adoption of suffrage. Though each arose from a somewhat distinct array of reform impulses and overcame varying opposition groups, they were closely related in some ways, supported by overlapping groups of people, advanced by large numbers of women, and, in part, lifted to enactment by similar motivations. Indeed, without the support of many conservative citizens approving both Amendments, it is not clear what the fate of suffrage would have been after World War ...


"A Woman Stumps Her State": Nellie G. Robinson And Women's Right To Hold Public Office In Ohio, Elizabeth D. Katz 2020 The University of Akron

"A Woman Stumps Her State": Nellie G. Robinson And Women's Right To Hold Public Office In Ohio, Elizabeth D. Katz

Akron Law Review

In recognition of the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, this essay provides an introduction to a largely overlooked yet essential component of the women’s movement: the pursuit of women’s legal right to hold public office. From the mid-nineteenth century through ratification of the federal suffrage amendment in 1920, women demanded access to appointed and elected positions, ranging from notary public to mayor. Because the legal right to hold office had literal and symbolic connections to the right to vote, suffragists and antisuffragists were deeply invested in the outcome. Courts and legislatures varied in their responses, with those in ...


Suffragist Prisoners And The Importance Of Protecting Prisoner Protests, Nicole B. Godfrey 2020 The University of Akron

Suffragist Prisoners And The Importance Of Protecting Prisoner Protests, Nicole B. Godfrey

Akron Law Review

This paper examines the role that public exposure to the conditions experienced by suffragist prisoners played in the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment. Using the experience of the suffragists as an example of how prisoner protest impacted democratic debate, the paper argues that robust protection of prisoners’ First Amendment rights is fundamental to the nation’s democratic values and political discourse and debate.

The paper begins with an historical overview of the arrests, convictions, and incarceration of the Silent Sentinels, women who began picketing outside the White House in 1917. Over the course of several months, local officials in the ...


Pillars Of Justice: Lawyers And The Liberal Tradition, By Owen Fiss, Saba Samanian 2020 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Pillars Of Justice: Lawyers And The Liberal Tradition, By Owen Fiss, Saba Samanian

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

AT TIMES, IT IS POSSIBLE TO UNDERESTIMATE, or perhaps momentarily forget, the individuals who have been instrumental in shaping the evolution of the justice system. Thankfully, Pillars of Justice by Owen Fiss serves as a reminder of the resilience and the triumph of such individuals. Each chapter of the book is dedicated to someone who he considers to have made a significant contribution to justice, and, as such, has become a personal hero.


Seeking Liberty, Finding Patriarchy: The Common Law's Historical Legacy, Deborah Dinner 2020 Emory University School of Law

Seeking Liberty, Finding Patriarchy: The Common Law's Historical Legacy, Deborah Dinner

Boston College Law Review

Anita Bernstein’s important new book argues that the common law might be used to advance women’s liberation. In this short essay, I analyze Bernstein’s three modes of historical analysis: redeeming the common law where it enforced oppression, recovering it when it promoted women’s rights, and facilitating its evolution toward a feminist future. I argue that Bernstein’s account, though learned and compelling, sidelines the centrality of patriarchy to the common law. Adopting the liberty of the patriarch cannot realize true freedom for women. By appropriating common law doctrines, feminists risk forging a conceptual alliance with the ...


What Is Remembered, Alice Ristroph 2020 Brooklyn Law School

What Is Remembered, Alice Ristroph

Michigan Law Review

Review of Sarah A. Seo's Policing the Open Road: How Cars Transformed American Freedom.


Coin, Currency, And Constitution: Reconsidering The National Bank Precedent, David S. Schwartz 2020 University of Wisconsin Law School

Coin, Currency, And Constitution: Reconsidering The National Bank Precedent, David S. Schwartz

Michigan Law Review

Review of Eric Lomazoff's Reconstructing the National Bank Controversy: Politics and Law in the Early American Republic.


Translating The Constitution, Jack M. Balkin 2020 Yale Law School

Translating The Constitution, Jack M. Balkin

Michigan Law Review

Review of Lawrence Lessig's Fidelity and Constraint: How the Supreme Court Has Read the American Constitution.


Fixing America's Founding, Maeve Glass 2020 Columbia Law School

Fixing America's Founding, Maeve Glass

Michigan Law Review

Review of Jonathan Gienapp's The Second Creation: Fixing the American Constitution in the Founding Era.


Conceptualizing Legal Childhood In The Twenty-First Century, Clare Huntington, Elizabeth S. Scott 2020 Fordham Law School

Conceptualizing Legal Childhood In The Twenty-First Century, Clare Huntington, Elizabeth S. Scott

Michigan Law Review

The law governing children is complex, sometimes appearing almost incoherent. The relatively simple framework established in the Progressive Era, in which parents had primary authority over children, subject to limited state oversight, has broken down over the past few decades. Lawmakers started granting children some adult rights and privileges, raising questions about their traditional status as vulnerable, dependent, and legally incompetent beings. As children emerged as legal persons, children’s rights advocates challenged the rationale for parental authority, contending that robust parental rights often harm children. And a wave of punitive reforms in response to juvenile crime in the 1990s ...


Fascism And Monopoly, Daniel A. Crane 2020 University of Michigan Law School

Fascism And Monopoly, Daniel A. Crane

Michigan Law Review

The recent revival of political interest in antitrust has resurfaced a longstanding debate about the role of industrial concentration and monopoly in enabling Hitler’s rise to power and the Third Reich’s wars of aggression. Proponents of stronger antitrust enforcement argue that monopolies and cartels brought the Nazis to power and warn that rising concentration in the American economy could similarly threaten democracy. Skeptics demur, observing that German big business largely opposed Hitler during the crucial years of his ascent. Drawing on business histories and archival material from the U.S. Office of Military Government’s Decartelization Branch, this ...


Hyperpartisan Gerrymandering, Michael S. Kang 2020 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Hyperpartisan Gerrymandering, Michael S. Kang

Boston College Law Review

To modern observers of American politics, our current hyperpartisan era appears historically extreme, even bizarrely partisan. The preceding Cold War era was far less partisan and ideologically polarized. Spanning roughly from World War II through the 1980s, it offers a hopeful model for a better, less partisan American politics. However, this historical baseline is badly misleading. Partisanship for most of American history was much more similar to today’s hyperpartisanship than the Cold War. And legislative redistricting, for most of American history, was just as intensely partisan as today’s hyperpartisan gerrymandering. But it was precisely during the Cold War ...


“Red Flag” Laws: How Law Enforcement’S Controversial New Tool To Reduce Mass Shootings Fits Within Current Second Amendment Jurisprudence, Coleman Gay 2020 Boston College Law School

“Red Flag” Laws: How Law Enforcement’S Controversial New Tool To Reduce Mass Shootings Fits Within Current Second Amendment Jurisprudence, Coleman Gay

Boston College Law Review

In the face of increased gun violence and mass shootings in the United States, so-called “red flag” laws have become a new and popular tool for protecting public safety. The laws are gaining momentum in state houses around the country because they provide law enforcement with a means to expeditiously remove firearms from potentially dangerous individuals—regardless of the individual’s criminal record and mental health history. Thus far, the laws are a magnet for constitutional challenges—including claims that the laws violate the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. This Note provides a historical and legal background of ...


Prefatory Notes On Persian Idioms Of Islamic Jurisprudence: Reasoning And Procedures Of Law-Making In Premodern Islamicate India, Naveen Kanalu 2020 University of California, Los Angeles

Prefatory Notes On Persian Idioms Of Islamic Jurisprudence: Reasoning And Procedures Of Law-Making In Premodern Islamicate India, Naveen Kanalu

Manuscript Studies

The essay elaborates on the manuscript tradition of transmission, commentary, and glossing of fiqh or “Islamic jurisprudence” texts in medieval and early-modern juridical culture from the Indian sub-continent. Premodern Muslim jurists composed doctrinal treatises primarily in Arabic, the shared theological language of the ‘ulamā’ or “learned scholars”. However, in the Indian context, Persian too had acquired the status of a language of Islamic law. From the fourteenth century, fatāwā compilations were made in Persian. By seventeenth-century Mughal rule in northern India, sharḥ or “commentary” and ḥāshiya or “super-commentary” in Persian were deployed as a mechanism for pedagogical transmission. Analyzing two ...


A Formulaic Recitation Will Not Do: Why, As A Matter Of Law, Federal Rule Of Criminal Procedure 7(C) Should Be Interpreted To Be At Least As Stringent As Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 8(A), Charles Eric Hintz 2020 University of Pennsylvania Law School

A Formulaic Recitation Will Not Do: Why, As A Matter Of Law, Federal Rule Of Criminal Procedure 7(C) Should Be Interpreted To Be At Least As Stringent As Federal Rule Of Civil Procedure 8(A), Charles Eric Hintz

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

When a plaintiff files a civil lawsuit in federal court, her complaint must satisfy certain minimum standards. Specifically, under the prevailing understanding of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 8(a), a complaint must contain sufficient factual matter to state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face, rather than mere conclusory statements tracking the elements of a cause of action. Given the infinitely higher stakes involved in criminal cases, one might think that at least as robust a requirement would exist in that context. But, in fact, a weaker pleading standard reigns. Under the governing interpretation of Federal ...


Fmc Corp. V. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Seth T. Bonilla 2020 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Fmc Corp. V. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Seth T. Bonilla

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In 1998, FMC Corporation agreed to submit to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes’ permitting processes, including the payment of fees, for clean-up work required as part of consent decree negotiations with the Environmental Protection Agency. Then, in 2002, FMC refused to pay the Tribes under a permitting agreement entered into by both parties, even though the company continued to store hazardous waste on land within the Shoshone-Bannock Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho. FMC challenged the Tribes’ authority to enforce the $1.5 million permitting fees first in tribal court and later challenged the Tribes’ authority to exercise civil regulatory and adjudicatory jurisdiction ...


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