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Gambling On Our Financial Future: How The Federal Government Fiddles While State Common Law Is A Safer Bet To Prevent Another Financial Collapse, Brian M. McCall 2015 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Gambling On Our Financial Future: How The Federal Government Fiddles While State Common Law Is A Safer Bet To Prevent Another Financial Collapse, Brian M. Mccall

Brian M McCall

Many politicians and commentators agree that credit default swaps (CDS) played a significant role in the financial crisis of 2008. Yet, few who observe this role are aware that CDS were set loose on the economy by the federal pre-emption of thousands of years of public policy. Since the time of Aristotle law, philosophy and public policy have been hostile to gambling. Viewed as a socially unproductive zero sum wealth transfer, the law has generally refused to permit parties to use the courts to enforce wagers. Courts and legislatures worked in harmony to control and in some cases punish financial ...


Constructed Constraint And The Constitutional Text, Curtis A. Bradley, Neil S. Siegel 2015 Duke Law

Constructed Constraint And The Constitutional Text, Curtis A. Bradley, Neil S. Siegel

Faculty Scholarship

In recent years, constitutional theorists have attended to the unwritten aspects of American constitutionalism and, relatedly, to the ways in which the constitutional text can be “constructed” upon by various materials. This Article takes a different approach. Instead of considering how various materials can supplement, implement, or interact with the constitutional text, the Article focuses on how the text itself is often partially constructed in American constitutional practice. Although interpreters typically regard clear text as controlling, this Article contends that whether the text is perceived to be clear is often affected by various “modalities” of constitutional interpretation that are normally ...


Silent Similarity, Jessica Litman 2015 SelectedWorks

Silent Similarity, Jessica Litman

Jessica Litman

From 1909 to 1930, U.S. courts grappled with claims by authors of prose works claiming that works in a new art form -- silent movies -- had infringed their copyrights. These cases laid the groundwork for much of modern copyright law, from their broad expansion of the reproduction right, to their puzzled grappling with the question how to compare works in dissimilar media, to their confusion over what sort of evidence should be relevant to show copyrightability, copying and infringement. Some of those cases – in particular, Nichols v. Universal Pictures – are canonical today. They are not, however, well-understood. In particular, the ...


Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr 2015 SelectedWorks

Systemic Lying, Julia Simon-Kerr

Julia Simon-Kerr

This Article offers the foundational account of systemic lying from a definitional and theoretical perspective. Systemic lying involves the cooperation of multiple actors in the legal system who lie or violate their oaths across cases for a consistent reason that is linked to their conception of justice. It becomes a functioning mechanism within the legal system and changes the operation of the law as written. By identifying systemic lying, this Article challenges the assumption that all lying in the legal system is the same. It argues that systemic lying poses a particular threat to the legal system. This means that ...


So Help Me God: A Comparative Study Of Religious Interest Group Litigation, Jayanth K. Krishnan, Kevin R. den Dulk 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

So Help Me God: A Comparative Study Of Religious Interest Group Litigation, Jayanth K. Krishnan, Kevin R. Den Dulk

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Defending Legal Realism: A Response To Four Critics, Hanoch Dagan 2014 BLR

Defending Legal Realism: A Response To Four Critics, Hanoch Dagan

Tel Aviv University Law Faculty Papers

My recently published book, Reconstructing American Legal Realism & Rethinking Private Law Theory (Oxford University Press, 2013), seeks to revive our understanding of law as a set of institutions accommodating three sets of constitutive tensions: power and reason, science and craft, and tradition and progress. This Issue of Critical Analysis of Law honored me with the publication of thoughtful and generous book reviews by Alan Brudner, Dan Farbman, Joseph Singer, and Laura Underkuffler. This short Essay reflects upon their insightful and important observations and attempts to provide some answers to their interesting and intriguing critiques of my account. I begin with ...


Mining For Gold: The Constitutional Court Of South Africa's Experience With Comparative Constitutional Law, Ursula Bentele 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Mining For Gold: The Constitutional Court Of South Africa's Experience With Comparative Constitutional Law, Ursula Bentele

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Restoring Constitutional Equilibrium, Adam Lamparello 2014 SelectedWorks

Restoring Constitutional Equilibrium, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

In areas such as the Fourteenth Amendment, the Supreme Court's lack of institutional restraint has affected citizens of every political persuasion. In Bush v. Gore, the Florida Supreme Court’s recount order was blocked. ‘Liberals,’ lost. In Roe v. Wade, the Court required state legislatures to allow most abortions in the first trimester. ‘Conservatives’ lost. In Clinton v. City of New York and Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the coordinate branch’s attempt to ensure a more efficient and fairer government was thwarted. Average citizens lost. The problem is not a liberal or conservative one, whatever those words ...


Pragmatic Liberalism: The Outlook Of The Dead, Justin Desautels-Stein 2014 Boston College Law School

Pragmatic Liberalism: The Outlook Of The Dead, Justin Desautels-Stein

Boston College Law Review

At the turn of the twentieth century, the legal profession was rocked in a storm of reform. Among the sparks of change was the view that “law in the books” had drifted too far from the “law in action.” This popular slogan reflected the broader postwar suspicion that the legal profession needed to be more realistic, more effective, and more in touch with the social needs of the time. A hundred years later, we face a similarly urgent demand for change. Across the blogs and journals stretches a thread of anxieties about the lack of fit between legal education and ...


Counsel For The Divorce, Rebecca Aviel 2014 Boston College Law School

Counsel For The Divorce, Rebecca Aviel

Boston College Law Review

This article challenges the legal profession’s foundational assumption that legal services must be delivered in an adversarial posture, with lawyers compelled to engage in robust partisan advocacy on behalf of their clients’ individualized interests. This narrow conception of the lawyer’s role is particularly inapt in family law because many divorcing spouses actually seek joint counsel, understanding that they have profound shared interests in minimizing transaction costs, maximizing the value of the marital estate, and reducing the hostility and animosity that are so harmful to children. Couples who wish to advance these interests by retaining joint counsel are poorly ...


Alan Watson's Controversial Contribution To Legal Scholarship, Gary Francione 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Alan Watson's Controversial Contribution To Legal Scholarship, Gary Francione

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Intervention In Roman Law: A Case Study In The Hazards Of Legal Scholarship, Peter A. Appel 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Intervention In Roman Law: A Case Study In The Hazards Of Legal Scholarship, Peter A. Appel

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Rediscovering Congressional Intelligence Oversight: Is Another Church Committee Possible Without Frank Church?, Marc B. Langston 2014 SelectedWorks

Rediscovering Congressional Intelligence Oversight: Is Another Church Committee Possible Without Frank Church?, Marc B. Langston

Marc B. Langston

In 1975-76, the Church Committee challenged Americans’ perception of their government by uncovering and publicly releasing secret activities undertaken by the U.S. Government. U.S. Senator Frank Church’s leadership represents a model for congressional oversight and the Church Committee’s investigation and public hearings remain increasingly relevant in a new age of domestic surveillance. The attached article compares a historical model of congressional oversight and reform, as demonstrated by Senator Frank Church’s leadership as chairman of the Church Committee, with current oversight deficiencies that have induced a growing population of citizens to demand greater protections against government ...


Citizenship In Red And Yellow: Elk V. Wilkins And United States V. Wong Kim Ark, Bethany Berger 2014 SelectedWorks

Citizenship In Red And Yellow: Elk V. Wilkins And United States V. Wong Kim Ark, Bethany Berger

Bethany Berger

American Indians and ethnic Chinese played outsized roles in the transformation of citizenship in the late nineteenth century, shaping debates and providing patterns as the geographic, racial, and ideological borders of citizenship hardened and the federal role and discretion in policing them expanded. Today, this transformation influences everything from the treatment of children of undocumented immigrants to tribal land, sovereign, and treaty rights to the status of U.S. island territories. This Article examines these changes and what they meant for the individuals and communities involved through the lenses of Elk v. Wilkins and United States v. Wong Kim Ark ...


Toward A United Ireland? The Northern Ireland Peace Process And The Devolution Of Powers From London To Belfast, Matthew G. Rooks 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Toward A United Ireland? The Northern Ireland Peace Process And The Devolution Of Powers From London To Belfast, Matthew G. Rooks

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Twenty-One Theses On The Legal Legacy Of The French Revolution In Latin America, Dante Figueroa 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Twenty-One Theses On The Legal Legacy Of The French Revolution In Latin America, Dante Figueroa

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Improbability Of Positivism, Andrew Tutt 2014 Pace University

The Improbability Of Positivism, Andrew Tutt

Pace Law Review

Ronald Dworkin’s contributions to legal philosophy have been subject to severe criticism in recent years. Other legal philosophers call his arguments “deflected or discredited,” laced with “philosophical confusions,” and “deeply embedded” mistakes. As Brian Leiter writes, “[t]he only good news in the story about Dworkin’s impact on law and philosophy is that most of the field declined to follow the Dworkinian path . . . .”

This Article endeavors to show that, far from an effort beset with primitive errors, Dworkin’s challenge to legal positivism in the opening pages of his seminal work was neither misguided nor trivial. Rather, Dworkin ...


Human Rights Violations By Canadian Companies Abroad: Choc V Hudbay Minerals Inc, Susana C. Mijares Peña 2014 Western University

Human Rights Violations By Canadian Companies Abroad: Choc V Hudbay Minerals Inc, Susana C. Mijares Peña

Western Journal of Legal Studies

Canadian mining corporations operating abroad represent a challenge to the international legal system and Canadian legal system in the field of human rights. Currently, there are no legal mechanisms available to ensure that these corporations abide by international standards and voluntary codes. For this reason, some argue that Canadian courts should be more active in holding Canadian companies accountable for the human rights violations of their affiliates operating abroad. The recent Ontario Superior Court of Justice decision of Choc v Hudbay Minerals suggests that for the first time, a Canadian court is ready to play a regulatory role in preventing ...


Book Review: Defending Battered Women On Trial, Rebecca M. Bromwich 2014 Western University

Book Review: Defending Battered Women On Trial, Rebecca M. Bromwich

Western Journal of Legal Studies

This is a book review of: Elizabeth A Sheehy, Defending Battered Women: Lessons from the Transcripts (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2014).


Federal Jurisdiction Over U.S. Citizens' Claims For Violations Of The Law Of Nations In Light Of Sosa, Gwynne Skinner 2014 University of Georgia School of Law

Federal Jurisdiction Over U.S. Citizens' Claims For Violations Of The Law Of Nations In Light Of Sosa, Gwynne Skinner

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


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