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More Of The Same: Elitism And Exclusion At The Aals Annual Meeting, David E. Steinberg 2017 University of Maine School of Law

More Of The Same: Elitism And Exclusion At The Aals Annual Meeting, David E. Steinberg

Maine Law Review

At the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) meetings and in materials published by the Association, probably no one word appears more frequently than “diversity.” For example, the theme of the 2000 AALS Annual Meeting was A Recommitment to Diversity. In a 1986 essay titled Collegial Diversity, AALS President Susan Westerberg Prager wrote: “The different perspectives of our colleagues can illuminate other areas of research to give us new classroom direction.” And, in a 1996 statement on diversity adopted by the AALS Executive Committee, the committee stated that an objective of diversity was “to create an educational community—and ultimately ...


Artificial Intelligence: Application Today And Implications Tomorrow, Sean Semmler, Zeeve Rose 2017 Duke Law

Artificial Intelligence: Application Today And Implications Tomorrow, Sean Semmler, Zeeve Rose

Duke Law & Technology Review

This paper analyzes the applications of artificial intelligence to the legal industry, specifically in the fields of legal research and contract drafting. First, it will look at the implications of artificial intelligence (A.I.) for the current practice of law. Second, it will delve into the future implications of A.I. on law firms and the possible regulatory challenges that come with A.I. The proliferation of A.I. in the legal sphere will give laymen (clients) access to the information and services traditionally provided exclusively by attorneys. With an increase in access to these services will come a change ...


Ethics, Law Firms, And Legal Education, Milton C. Regan Jr. 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Ethics, Law Firms, And Legal Education, Milton C. Regan Jr.

Maine Law Review

A rash of recent corporate scandals has once again put professional ethics in the spotlight. It's hard to pick up the Wall Street Journal each day and not read that authorities have launched a new investigation or that additional indictments are imminent. Stories of financial fraud and outright looting have galvanized the public and shaken the economy. What ethical lessons can we draw from these events? Two explanations seem especially prominent. The first is a story of individuals without an adequate moral compass. Some people's greed and ambition were unchecked by any internal ethical constraints. For such deviants ...


Using Science To Build Better Learners: One School’S Successful Efforts To Raise Its Bar Passage Rates In An Era Of Decline, Louis Schulze 2017 Florida International University College of Law

Using Science To Build Better Learners: One School’S Successful Efforts To Raise Its Bar Passage Rates In An Era Of Decline, Louis Schulze

Distinguished Speaker Series

What measures can law schools take to improve student performance and bar passage? The answer is not what you think. Recent developments in the science of learning show that most law students learn wrong. In fact, ineffective methods of learning pervade all levels of education. We now know that widely accepted learning and study strategies that were once considered gospel are actually deeply flawed. Yet we still embrace and propagate those myths.

Meanwhile, bar passage rates and law student performance are plummeting. Everyone in legal education is asking, “What can we do?” But, “What can we do?” is the wrong ...


Cple Newsletter Issue 9, 2017 Bond University

Cple Newsletter Issue 9

Centre for Professional Legal Education Newsletter

Welcome to this edition of the CPLE Newsletter. It is my pleasure to introduce this newsletter reporting on the many activities Centre members have undertaken since the release of our last edition.


Blended Learning In The Law Classroom: Design, Implementation And Evaluation Of An Intervention In The First Year Curriculum Design, Melissa Castan, Ross Hyams 2017 Monash University

Blended Learning In The Law Classroom: Design, Implementation And Evaluation Of An Intervention In The First Year Curriculum Design, Melissa Castan, Ross Hyams

Legal Education Review

When a university-mandated ‘Better Teaching Better Learning’ agenda targeted at unit enhancement coincided with a whole of curriculum review, law lecturers teaching first year law units at Monash University piloted a ‘semi-flipped’ series of short videos, supported by online and in-class activities, in order to incorporate blended learning design in key foundation units. This paper examines the key issues in the design, and implementation and evaluation of the ‘semi-flipped’ experience, highlighting lessons learnt, in terms of technical support, pedagogical issues and assessment considerations. In particular, the utility in seeking to evaluate students’ learning outcomes, engagement with reading materials and in-class ...


Student Perspectives On Talking About Sexual Assault In Australian Law Classes, Anna Belgiorno-Nettis 2017 Bond University

Student Perspectives On Talking About Sexual Assault In Australian Law Classes, Anna Belgiorno-Nettis

Legal Education Review

Much of the academic literature on how to talk about sexual assault in law classrooms is written by lecturers, however it is often in reaction to student viewpoints. This paper responds to lecturer approaches by representing student perspectives on talking about sexual assault in Australian law classes, and how student experiences might inform teaching methods. I suggest that the student anecdotes that are recounted in the paper highlight two aims in teaching sexual assault law beyond a learning outcome involving knowledge of substantive law. The first is to acknowledge the perspective of students that have experienced sexual assault, and the ...


December 2017 Magazine, 2017 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

December 2017 Magazine

Ergo

No abstract provided.


Active Learning In Law By Flipping The Classroom: An Enquiry Into Effectiveness And Engagement, Kylie Burns, Mary Keyes, Therese Wilson, Joanne Stagg-Taylor, Kate Van Doore 2017 Griffith University

Active Learning In Law By Flipping The Classroom: An Enquiry Into Effectiveness And Engagement, Kylie Burns, Mary Keyes, Therese Wilson, Joanne Stagg-Taylor, Kate Van Doore

Legal Education Review

Extract:

Legal educators are increasingly encouraged, if not directed, to apply technological innovations in course design and delivery. The use of blended learning, in which courses are delivered in a combination of face-to-face settings and online, has become almost ubiquitous. Blended learning is often associated with active learning, in that a combination of face-to-face and online activities are particularly suitable to facilitate students’ active engagement in learning. Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in a particular type of blended learning which is known as ‘flipped’ learning.


December 2017 Newsletter, 2017 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

December 2017 Newsletter

Ergo

No abstract provided.


Law Library Blog (December 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Law Library Blog (December 2017): Legal Beagle's Blog Archive, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Law Library Newsletters/Blog

No abstract provided.


Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: Show, Don't Tell 12-1-2017, Michael Yelnosky 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Trending @ Rwu Law: Dean Yelnosky's Post: Show, Don't Tell 12-1-2017, Michael Yelnosky

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Towards Engaged Scholarship, John R. Nolon, Michelle Bryan Mudd, Michael Burger, Kim Diana Connolly, Nestor Davidson, Matthew Festa, Jill I. Gross, Lisa Heinzerling, Keith Hirokawa, Tim Iglesias, Patrick C. McGinley, Sean Nolon, Uma Outka, Jessica Owley, Kalyani Robbins, Jonathan Rosenbloom, Christopher Serkin 2017 Pace University School of Law

Towards Engaged Scholarship, John R. Nolon, Michelle Bryan Mudd, Michael Burger, Kim Diana Connolly, Nestor Davidson, Matthew Festa, Jill I. Gross, Lisa Heinzerling, Keith Hirokawa, Tim Iglesias, Patrick C. Mcginley, Sean Nolon, Uma Outka, Jessica Owley, Kalyani Robbins, Jonathan Rosenbloom, Christopher Serkin

Jessica Owley

The presenting question for the 2012 Symposium was how can engaged scholarship enhance teaching to prepare students for the legal profession and help to solve the critical problems of the day.12 The event employed a format designed to discover new ways of thinking about engaged scholarship. Each participant was asked to draft and submit in advance brief reflections on this question. At the Symposium, each professor attended seven breakout sessions held throughout the day. At each of these sessions, one participant presented to a small group of professors for ten minutes on her reflections, pinpointing issues, challenges, and themes ...


Irlafarc! Surveying The Language Of Legal Writing, Terrill Pollman, Judith M. Stinson 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Irlafarc! Surveying The Language Of Legal Writing, Terrill Pollman, Judith M. Stinson

Maine Law Review

Language, like law, is a living thing. It grows and changes. It both reflects and shapes the communities that use it. The language of the community of legal writing professors demonstrates this process. Legal writing professors, who stand at the heart of an emerging discipline in the legal academy, are creating new terms, or neologisms, as they struggle to articulate principles of legal analysis, organizational paradigms conventional to legal writing, and other legal writing concepts. This new vocabulary can be both beneficial and detrimental. It can be beneficial because it expands the substance of an emerging discipline. It also can ...


Heroism Science Offers A New Framework For Cultivating Civic Virtue Within Clinical Law Programs, Francina Cantatore, Nickolas J. James 2017 Bond University

Heroism Science Offers A New Framework For Cultivating Civic Virtue Within Clinical Law Programs, Francina Cantatore, Nickolas J. James

Australian Journal of Clinical Education

Law schools have an obligation to produce law graduates who are not only knowledgeable and competent but also committed to working towards the public good. Clinical law programs, and in particular pro bono law clinics, have the potential to provoke a positive personal transformation on the part of the law student, leading to the development of civic virtue, but law schools lack a useful framework for conceptualising, facilitating and evaluating this personal transformation. The emergent field of heroism science provides such a framework. In particular the notion of the ‘hero’s journey’ can be drawn upon to address some of ...


Vol. 53, No. 13 (November 20, 2017), 2017 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Vol. 53, No. 13 (November 20, 2017)

Indiana Law Annotated

No abstract provided.


The Pro Bono Collaborative Project Spotlight: Rwu Law Street Law: Teaching Teens About The Law And Inspiring Future Lawyers 11-16-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

The Pro Bono Collaborative Project Spotlight: Rwu Law Street Law: Teaching Teens About The Law And Inspiring Future Lawyers 11-16-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Pro Bono Collaborative Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


Higher Education Under Pressure: What Will The Future Hold?, Nora V. Demleitner 2017 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Higher Education Under Pressure: What Will The Future Hold?, Nora V. Demleitner

Nora V. Demleitner

Not available.


Dean's Desk: Past And Present, Women Play Key Roles At Iu Maurer, Austen L. Parrish 2017 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Dean's Desk: Past And Present, Women Play Key Roles At Iu Maurer, Austen L. Parrish

Austen Parrish (2014-)

Under first lady Laurie Burns McRobbie’s leadership, Indiana University founded Women’s Philanthropy as one way to celebrate alumnae leadership and to make the achievements of our most talented and trailblazing women graduates more visible. As the IU Maurer School of Law’s 175th year draws to a close, consistent with these larger University efforts, it’s an opportune time to celebrate some of the law school’s extraordinary women graduates. Their stories are powerful and inspiring, and I’m pleased to share just a few.


As A Last Resort, Ask The Students: What They Say Makes Someone An Effective Law Teacher, James B. Levy 2017 University of Maine School of Law

As A Last Resort, Ask The Students: What They Say Makes Someone An Effective Law Teacher, James B. Levy

Maine Law Review

There is an adage among doctors that “as a last resort, ask the patient.” It is a not so facetious reference to the observation that because doctors are so highly educated and trained, they can start to believe they know what’s best for their patients better than the patients themselves. Consequently, these doctors may discount, or altogether ignore, the opinions of the very people they are suppose to be helping. The same observation could be made about the law professor-student relationship. Unlike doctors, though, our relationship with students is hierarchical, and thus we may be even less inclined to ...


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