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The Modigliani-Miller Theorem At 60: The Long-Overlooked Legal Applications Of Finance’S Foundational Theorem, Michael S. Knoll 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Modigliani-Miller Theorem At 60: The Long-Overlooked Legal Applications Of Finance’S Foundational Theorem, Michael S. Knoll

Faculty Scholarship

2018 marks the 60th anniversary of the publication of Franco Modigliani and Merton Miller’s The Cost of Capital, Corporation Finance, and the Theory of Investment. Widely hailed as the foundation of modern finance, their article, which purports to demonstrate that a firm’s value is independent of its capital structure, is little known by lawyers, including legal academics. That is unfortunate because the Modigliani-Miller capital structure irrelevancy proposition (when inverted) provides a framework that can be extremely useful to legal academics, practicing attorneys and judges.


Incentivizing Moral Development In Law School: The Benefits Of Personal Moral Growth Moving Forward, Michael McSherry 2017 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Incentivizing Moral Development In Law School: The Benefits Of Personal Moral Growth Moving Forward, Michael Mcsherry

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Collected Works, October 6, 2017, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Collected Works, October 6, 2017, University Of Michigan Law School

Newsletters

Collected Works is a summary of faculty activities, publications, and news that has been collected in the last two weeks. Collected Works comprises information culled from a variety of sources, but most heavily relies on information submitted directly by faculty.


Institutional Triage: Reflections On Being Acquired, Aric K. Short 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Institutional Triage: Reflections On Being Acquired, Aric K. Short

Aric Short

On June 25, 2012, I walked into the dean's office at Texas Wesleyan University School of Law. He and I had been summoned by our university president to a hastily called meeting to discuss the law school's "academic program." Since I helped oversee our academic program as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the time, I was not particularly looking forward to the meeting. I assumed there would be bad news of some sort.

Instead, we were told that Texas Wesleyan University ("TWU") and Texas A&M University ("TAMU") were in negotiations that, it was expected, would result in a "strategic partnership" beneficial to both universities. One result of that partnership, we were told, would be that operational control of TWU School of Law would be transitioned to TAMU. I must have looked as confused as I felt at that moment, because the President then leaned forward and with a kind, patient face said to me, "If everything goes as expected, the law school will be acquired by Texas A&M."

The following two years at the law school were extraordinary. We spent 2012-2013 building relationships with TAMU and laying the foundation for our transition, all the while continuing our existing programs for 750 students. On August 13, 2013, approximately one year after we were told about the negotiations, the acquisition was complete, and we began operations as Texas A&M University School of Law. The following academic year, 2013-2014, involved navigating countless changes and adjustments across the entire range of our operations. One thing we did not have during the last two years was the luxury of reflection and careful planning. Instead, our work was triage. Certain tasks had to be completed so we could survive and operate as TAMU School of Law from day one. Others could wait, at least a short while.

In Part I of this Essay, I provide a brief summary of the past two years at TWU-TAMU School of Law for background and context. In Part II, I provide a few reflections based on my experience in the leadership team that helped navigate our school through this significant transition. These are things I wish I had known two years ago. Perhaps law school administrators at schools facing similar institutional triage in the future will find them useful.

Given the news from law schools across the country, it seems clear that other institutional changes are brewing, if not actively underway, as this Essay goes to print. These are difficult times (and, of course, times of opportunity) in legal education. Applications, enrollment, indicators, and revenue are down nationwide, job prospects for many graduates have dwindled, and schools are rethinking and reinventing their educational goals, programs, and operations. As universities and law schools grapple with these challenges, major changes will result. Institutions will "right size," merge, or close altogether. The leaders of those schools will face difficult decisions, some of which will have to be made on short notice with little time to thoroughly plan and evaluate options.

This is not a "how-to" essay. From an administrative perspective, I think we did a number of things right and well during our last two years. But, as is usually the case in life, we could have done many things better. And we certainly made at least a few mistakes. To the extent there is value in these reflections, it may lie primarily in what we could have done more effectively or efficiently.

As challenging as these past two years have been for our law school, we are now a stronger institution. We operated as a part of TWU from 1992 through 2013. During that time, we gained full American Bar Association ("ABA") accreditation (1994), were granted membership in the Association of American Law Schools (2012), achieved a strong regional reputation for producing well-trained and skilled graduates, and attracted a talented faculty with diverse scholarly and teaching interests. With our transition to TAMU, the future looks even brighter for our institution. Financial support for the law school has increased; we are carefully developing a number of new academic initiatives, including collaborations ...


The Pro Bono Collaborative Project Spotlight: Increasing Access To Justice Just Got A Little Easier In Rhode Island 10-05-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

The Pro Bono Collaborative Project Spotlight: Increasing Access To Justice Just Got A Little Easier In Rhode Island 10-05-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Pro Bono Collaborative Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


Encouraging Engaged Scholarship: Perspectives From An Associate Dean For Research, Sonia K. Katyal 2017 Selected Works

Encouraging Engaged Scholarship: Perspectives From An Associate Dean For Research, Sonia K. Katyal

Sonia Katyal

No abstract provided.


Vol. 53, No. 07 (October 2, 2017), 2017 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Vol. 53, No. 07 (October 2, 2017)

Indiana Law Annotated

No abstract provided.


Annual Report Of The Indiana Universiy Maurer School Of Law Digital Repository 2016/17, Richard Vaughan 2017 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Annual Report Of The Indiana Universiy Maurer School Of Law Digital Repository 2016/17, Richard Vaughan

Digital Repository Annual Reports

A brief annual report documenting the use and growth of the Indiana University Maurer School of Law, Jerome Hall Law Library, Digital Repository. Includes lists of the most downloaded documents and attached Excel spreadsheets of data.


October 2017 Newsletter, 2017 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

October 2017 Newsletter

Ergo

No abstract provided.


Foreword - Teaching Legal Writing, Chantal Morton 2017 University of Melbourne

Foreword - Teaching Legal Writing, Chantal Morton

Legal Education Review

This issue contains three papers first presented at a Legal Writing Symposium hosted by Melbourne Law School in December 2015. The event was designed to highlight the diversity of approaches to teaching legal analysis and writing in law school, and the creative and inspiring people who think deeply about these topics. When Kate Galloway, current Editor in Chief of the Legal Education Review, heard about the symposium she approached me to suggest a special edition to highlight the papers presented. This edition is the result of her creative suggestion, the generosity of the editors at the LER, and the commitment ...


A Revealed Preferences Approach To Ranking Law Schools, Brian L. Frye, Christopher J. Ryan Jr. 2017 University of Kentucky College of Law

A Revealed Preferences Approach To Ranking Law Schools, Brian L. Frye, Christopher J. Ryan Jr.

Law Faculty Scholarly Articles

The U.S. News & World Report (U.S. News) “Best Law Schools Rankings” defines the market for legal education. Law schools compete to improve their standing in the U.S. News rankings and fear any decline. But the U.S. News rankings are controversial, at least in part because they rely on factors that are poor proxies for quality, like peer reputation and expenditures per student. While many alternative law school rankings exist, none have challenged the market dominance of the U.S. News rankings. Presumably the U.S. News rankings benefit from a first-mover advantage, other rankings fail to ...


The Economic Justice Imperative For Transactional Law Clinics, Lynnise E. Pantin 2017 Boston College Law School

The Economic Justice Imperative For Transactional Law Clinics, Lynnise E. Pantin

Lynnise E. Pantin

The economic, political, and social volatility of the sixties and seventies, out of which clinical legal education was born, has certain mythical qualities for most law students, and perhaps some law professors. America still bears the scars of the economic policies of those previous eras, such as redlining, blockbusting, poverty and urban decay. While the realities of the era may seem out of reach for many of our students, those policies arising out of that era have contributed to the wealth gap in this country, which has worsened over the last twenty years. Now more than ever, society needs social ...


Are Law Degrees As Valuable To Minorities?, Frank McIntyre, Michael Simkovic 2017 Rutgers Business School

Are Law Degrees As Valuable To Minorities?, Frank Mcintyre, Michael Simkovic

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

We estimate the increase in earnings from a law degree relative to a bachelor’s degree for graduates of different race/ethnic groups. Law earnings premiums are higher for whites than for minorities (excluding individuals raised outside the U.S.). The median annual law earnings premium is approximately $41,000 for whites, $34,000 for Asians, $33,000 for blacks, and $28,000 for Hispanics. Law earnings premiums for whites, blacks and Hispanics have trended upward and appear to be gradually converging. Approximately 90 percent of law graduates are white compared to approximately 82 percent of bachelor’s degree holders.


Vol. 53, No. 06 (September 25, 2017), 2017 Maurer School of Law: Indiana University

Vol. 53, No. 06 (September 25, 2017)

Indiana Law Annotated

No abstract provided.


Roundtable – Teaching Human Rights: Challenges And Best Practices, Shayna Plaut, Kristi Kenyon, Joel Pruce, William Simmons 2017 Simon Fraser University

Roundtable – Teaching Human Rights: Challenges And Best Practices, Shayna Plaut, Kristi Kenyon, Joel Pruce, William Simmons

Joel Pruce

Over the past 20 years, courses addressing human rights have grown dramatically at both the undergraduate and graduate levels worldwide. Many of these courses are housed in specific disciplines, focus on specific issues, and require practical experience in the form of internships/practicums. Amid this growth there is a need to reflect on teaching human rights including the challenges, fears, and best practices.

Recognizing that education takes place inside and outside a classroom, this roundtable brings together scholars teaching human rights in a variety of settings to examine the current state of university human rights education. This includes a discussion ...


Open Source: The Enewsletter Of Rwu Law 09-22-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Open Source: The Enewsletter Of Rwu Law 09-22-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


International Perspectives On Privacy And Free Expression: Concepts, Conflicts, Consequences, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

International Perspectives On Privacy And Free Expression: Concepts, Conflicts, Consequences, University Of Michigan Law School

Event Materials

This conference contributes to the energetic and transnational dialogue currently going on about privacy: How do we define it? Is it a right, an interest, a value, or something else? Privacy against what? Privacy from whom? Is privacy necessarily in tension with free expression? Or is it often an essential predicate to it? How have different political regimes answered these questions? How do entities and individuals navigate those conflicting transnational approaches?

This is the program for the conference.


Collected Works, September 22, 2017, University of Michigan Law School 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Collected Works, September 22, 2017, University Of Michigan Law School

Newsletters

Collected Works is a summary of faculty activities, publications, and news that has been collected in the last two weeks. Collected Works comprises information culled from a variety of sources, but most heavily relies on information submitted directly by faculty.


Newsroom: From Farm To School 09-21-2017, Jill Rodrigues, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: From Farm To School 09-21-2017, Jill Rodrigues, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Governor Raimondo On Rwu Law 09-19-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Governor Raimondo On Rwu Law 09-19-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


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