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Reply To Richard A. Leo And Jon B. Gould, Samuel R. Gross, Barbara O'Brien 2010 University of Michigan Law School

Reply To Richard A. Leo And Jon B. Gould, Samuel R. Gross, Barbara O'Brien

Articles

The following is a letter to the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law received from Professors Samuel Gross and Barbara O'Brien, responding to an article published in the Journal in Fall 2009 by Professors Richard Leo and Jon Gould. This letter is followed by a reply from Professors Leo and Gould. Professors Gross and O'Brien did not see the reply prior to the Journal going to press. As we have indicated before, we welcome letters to the Journal from readers on any topic covered in a prior issue. - Editors


The Overlooked Significance Of Arizona's New Immigration Law, Rick Su 2010 UNC School of Law

The Overlooked Significance Of Arizona's New Immigration Law, Rick Su

Journal Articles

The current debate over Arizona's new immigration statute, S.B. 1070, has largely focused on the extent to which it “empowers” or “allows” state and local law enforcement officials to enforce federal immigration laws. Yet, in doing so, the conversation thus far overlooks the most significant part of the new statute: the extent to which Arizona mandates local immigration enforcement by attacking local control. The fact is the new Arizona law does little to adjust the federalist balance with respect to immigration enforcement. What it does, however, is threaten to radically alter the state-local relationship by eliminating local discretion ...


Post-Modern Meditations On Punishment: On The Limits Of Reason And The Virtues Of Randomization (A Polemic And Manifesto For The Twenty-First Century), Bernard E. Harcourt 2010 Columbia Law School

Post-Modern Meditations On Punishment: On The Limits Of Reason And The Virtues Of Randomization (A Polemic And Manifesto For The Twenty-First Century), Bernard E. Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

Since the modern era, the discourse of punishment has cycled through three sets of questions. The first, born of the Enlightenment itself, asked: On what ground does the sovereign have the right to punish? Nietzsche most forcefully, but others as well, argued that the question itself begged its own answer. With the birth of the social sciences, this skepticism gave rise to a second set of questions: What then is the true function of punishment? What is it that we do when we punish? A series of further critiques – of meta-narratives, of functionalism, of scientific objectivity – softened this second line ...


Risk As A Proxy For Race, Bernard E. Harcourt 2010 Columbia Law School

Risk As A Proxy For Race, Bernard E. Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

Today, an increasing chorus argues that risk-assessment instruments are a politically feasible way to resolve our problem of mass incarceration and reduce prison populations. In this essay, I argue against this progressive argument for prediction: using risk-assessment tools to decrease prison populations would unquestionably aggravate the already intolerable racial imbalance in our prison populations and will not address the real source of mass incarceration, namely the admissions process. Risk has collapsed into prior criminal history, and prior criminal history has become a proxy for race. This means that using risk-assessment tools, even for progressive ends, is going to significantly aggravate ...


Gilbert & Sullivan And Scalia: Philosophy, Proportionality, And The Eighth Amendment, Ian P. Farrell 2010 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

Gilbert & Sullivan And Scalia: Philosophy, Proportionality, And The Eighth Amendment, Ian P. Farrell

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Strategic Enforcement, Margaret H. Lemos, Alex Stein 2010 Duke Law School

Strategic Enforcement, Margaret H. Lemos, Alex Stein

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Ongoing Revolution In Punishment Theory: Doing Justice As Controlling Crime, Paul H. Robinson 2010 University of Pennsylvania

The Ongoing Revolution In Punishment Theory: Doing Justice As Controlling Crime, Paul H. Robinson

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This lecture offers a broad review of current punishment theory debates and the alternative distributive principles for criminal liability and punishment that they suggest. This broader perspective attempts to explain in part the Model Penal Code's recent shift to reliance upon desert and accompanying limitation on the principles of deterrence, incapacitation, and rehabilitation.


Documentation, Documentary, And The Law: What Should Be Made Of Victim Impact Videos?, Regina Austin 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Documentation, Documentary, And The Law: What Should Be Made Of Victim Impact Videos?, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Since the Supreme Court sanctioned the introduction of victim impact evidence in the sentencing phase of capital cases in Payne v. Tennessee, 501 U.S. 808 (1991), there have been a number of reported decisions in which that evidence has taken the form of videos composed of home-produced still photographs and moving images of the victim. Most of these videos were first shown at funerals or memorial services and contain music appropriate for such occasions. This article considers the probative value of victim impact videos and responds to the call of Justice John Paul Stevens, made in a statement regarding ...


The Governance Of Military Police In Canada, Andrew Halpenny 2010 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

The Governance Of Military Police In Canada, Andrew Halpenny

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

The Military Police is a special federal police force in Canada with unique authority, designed to support military commanders both in operations and in garrison. However, it has historically been under the command of non-Military Police officers, and is consequently not governed like other police forces in Canada. Part of this arrangement can be explained by its special military duties, but much of it is the result of a tradition that is at odds with current societal norms. It is the position of the author that differences in norms between the Military Police and other Canadian police forces can only ...


Regulating Segregation: The Contribution Of The Aba Criminal Justice Standards On The Treatment Of Prisoners, Margo Schlanger 2010 University of Michigan Law School

Regulating Segregation: The Contribution Of The Aba Criminal Justice Standards On The Treatment Of Prisoners, Margo Schlanger

Articles

Over recent decades, solitary confinement for prisoners has increased in prevalence and in salience. Whether given the label "disciplinary segregation," "administrative segregation," "special housing," "seg," "the hole," "supermax," or any of a dozen or more names, the conditions of solitary confinement share basic features: twenty-three hours per day or more spent alone in a cell, with little to do and no one to talk to, and one hour per day or less in a different, but no less isolated, setting-an exercise cage or a space with a shower. Long-term segregation units operated along these lines are extraordinarily expensive to build ...


The Durability Of Prison Populations, John Pfaff 2010 Fordham University School of Law

The Durability Of Prison Populations, John Pfaff

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Dispute Resolution Lessons Gleaned From The Arrest Of Professor Gates And "The Beer Summit", Elayne E. Greenberg 2010 St. John's University School of Law

Dispute Resolution Lessons Gleaned From The Arrest Of Professor Gates And "The Beer Summit", Elayne E. Greenberg

Faculty Publications

America's fantasy of a post-racial society was shattered on July 16,2009, when a white police officer arrested Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates, a well-respected African-American academic, in his own home. Our historical racial fissure was widened. Once again, our thoughts were plagued with tortured images of our system of racialized law enforcement: the torture of Abner Louima, the beating of Rodney King, the killing of Amadou Diallo. Predictably, Americans became further polarized, as they simultaneously blamed and defended responses to racism.

In what was perceived by some as a dramatic and unanticipated turn of events, and perceived by ...


The Order-Maintenance Agenda As Land Use Policy, Nicole Stelle Garnett 2010 Notre Dame Law School

The Order-Maintenance Agenda As Land Use Policy, Nicole Stelle Garnett

Journal Articles

Debates about the broken windows hypothesis focus almost exclusively on whether the order-maintenance agenda represents wise criminal law policy — specifically on whether, when, and at what cost, order-maintenance policing techniques reduce serious crime. These questions are important, but incomplete. This Essay, which was solicited for a symposium on urban-development policy, considers potential benefits of order-maintenance policies other than crime-reduction, especially reducing the fear of crime. The Broken Windows essay itself urged that attention to disorder was important not just because disorder was a precursor to more serious crime, but also because disorder undermined residents’ sense of security. The later scholarly ...


The American Inquisition: Sentencing After The Federal Guidelines, Ricardo J. Bascuas 2010 University of Miami School of Law

The American Inquisition: Sentencing After The Federal Guidelines, Ricardo J. Bascuas

Articles

No abstract provided.


Innocence Commissions And The Future Of Post-Conviction Review, David Wolitz 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Innocence Commissions And The Future Of Post-Conviction Review, David Wolitz

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In the fall of 2006, North Carolina became the first state to establish an innocence commission – a state institution with the power to review and investigate individual post-conviction claims of actual innocence. And on February 17, 2010, after spending seventeen years in prison for a murder he did not commit, Greg Taylor became the first person exonerated through the innocence commission process. This article argues that the innocence commission model pioneered by North Carolina has proven itself to be a major institutional improvement over conventional post-conviction review. The article explains why existing court-based procedures are inadequate to address collateral claims ...


Why Care About Mass Incarceration?, James Forman Jr. 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Why Care About Mass Incarceration?, James Forman Jr.

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The United States incarcerates more of its citizens than any other nation in the world. Paul Butler’s Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hip Theory of Justice makes an important contribution to the debate about the crime policies that have produced this result. Butler began his career as a federal prosecutor who believed that the best way to serve Washington, D.C’s low-income African-American community was to punish its law-breakers. His experiences—including being prosecuted for a crime himself—eventually led him to conclude that America incarcerates far too many nonviolent offenders, especially drug offenders. Let’s Get Free ...


The Process Is The Problem: Lessons Learned From United States Drug Sentencing Reform, Erik S. Siebert 2010 University of Richmond School of Law

The Process Is The Problem: Lessons Learned From United States Drug Sentencing Reform, Erik S. Siebert

University of Richmond Law Review

No abstract provided.


Jurisdiction And Internet In Relation To Commercial Law Disputes In A European Context, Ulf Maunsbach, Patrik Lindskoug 2009 Lund University, Faculty of Law

Jurisdiction And Internet In Relation To Commercial Law Disputes In A European Context, Ulf Maunsbach, Patrik Lindskoug

Ulf Maunsbach

No abstract provided.


Commentary On Predicting Crime, Tom Bell 2009 Chapman University, Fowler School of Law

Commentary On Predicting Crime, Tom Bell

Tom W. Bell

The market mechanisms proposed in Predicting Crime offer many virtues. The authors describe several of these—unbiased information collection; incentives that encourage disclosure; opinions weighted by conviction; information aggregation; instantaneous and continuous feedback—and convincingly argue that these structural features stand to help prediction markets outperform alternative institutions in forecasting the interplay of crime rates and crime polices. In that, Predicting Crime adopts an economic point of view and speaks in terms of practical experience. After all, similar structural features have already appeared in other successful prediction markets, such as those offering trading in claims about the weather, flu outbreaks ...


Commentary: Overcoming Judicial Preferences For Person- Versus Situation-Based Analyses Of Interrogation-Induced Confessions, Deborah Davis, Richard Leo 2009 University of San Francisco

Commentary: Overcoming Judicial Preferences For Person- Versus Situation-Based Analyses Of Interrogation-Induced Confessions, Deborah Davis, Richard Leo

Richard A. Leo

This article identifies some fundamentally mistaken assumptions underlying admissibility decisions favoring disposition-related expert testimony regarding individual vulnerability to false confession over situation-based testimony describing how the context or nature of interrogation can promote false confessions. The authors argue that it is important to understand both the forces of influence within police interrogations and the individual differences that enhance vulnerability to these forces. Most false confessions occur in the context of interrogation and in response to the sources of distress and persuasive tactics of the interrogation. For this reason, this article suggests that experts asked to evaluate an interrogation-induced confession should ...


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