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Commentary On Predicting Crime, Tom Bell 2009 Chapman University, Fowler School of Law

Commentary On Predicting Crime, Tom Bell

Tom W. Bell

The market mechanisms proposed in Predicting Crime offer many virtues. The authors describe several of these—unbiased information collection; incentives that encourage disclosure; opinions weighted by conviction; information aggregation; instantaneous and continuous feedback—and convincingly argue that these structural features stand to help prediction markets outperform alternative institutions in forecasting the interplay of crime rates and crime polices. In that, Predicting Crime adopts an economic point of view and speaks in terms of practical experience. After all, similar structural features have already appeared in other successful prediction markets, such as those offering trading in claims about the weather, flu outbreaks ...


Commentary: Overcoming Judicial Preferences For Person- Versus Situation-Based Analyses Of Interrogation-Induced Confessions, Deborah Davis, Richard Leo 2009 University of San Francisco

Commentary: Overcoming Judicial Preferences For Person- Versus Situation-Based Analyses Of Interrogation-Induced Confessions, Deborah Davis, Richard Leo

Richard A. Leo

This article identifies some fundamentally mistaken assumptions underlying admissibility decisions favoring disposition-related expert testimony regarding individual vulnerability to false confession over situation-based testimony describing how the context or nature of interrogation can promote false confessions. The authors argue that it is important to understand both the forces of influence within police interrogations and the individual differences that enhance vulnerability to these forces. Most false confessions occur in the context of interrogation and in response to the sources of distress and persuasive tactics of the interrogation. For this reason, this article suggests that experts asked to evaluate an interrogation-induced confession should ...


One Hundred Years Later: Wrongful Convictions After A Century Of Research, Richard Leo 2009 University of San Francisco School of Law

One Hundred Years Later: Wrongful Convictions After A Century Of Research, Richard Leo

Richard A. Leo

In this article the authors analyze a century of research on the causes and consequences of wrongful convictions in the American criminal justice system while explaining the many lessons of this body of work. This article chronicles the range of research that has been conducted on wrongful convictions; examines the common sources of error in the criminal justice system and their effects; suggests where additional research and attention are needed; and discusses methodological strategies for improving the quality of research on wrongful convictions. The authors argue that traditional sources of error (eyewitness misidentification, false confessions, perjured testimony, forensic error, tunnel ...


Lessons Of Disloyalty In The World Of Criminal Informants, Michael L. Rich 2009 Elon University School of Law

Lessons Of Disloyalty In The World Of Criminal Informants, Michael L. Rich

Michael L Rich

Without informants, policing would grind to a halt. The majority of drug and organized crime prosecutions hinge on the assistance of confidential informants, and white collar prosecutions and anti-terrorism investigations increasingly depend on them. Yet society by and large hates informants. The epithets used to describe them – “snitch,” “rat,” and “weasel,” among others – suggest the reason: the informant, by assisting the police, is guilty of betrayal. And betrayal is, in the words of George Fletcher, “one of the basic sins of our civilization.” But identifying disloyalty as the reason for society’s disdain raises more questions than it answers. Are ...


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