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A Quantitative Assessment Of Spirituality In Police Officers And The Relationship To Police Stress, Antoinette M. Ursitti 2011 Olivet Nazarene University

A Quantitative Assessment Of Spirituality In Police Officers And The Relationship To Police Stress, Antoinette M. Ursitti

Ed.D. Dissertations

Law enforcement has been recognized as a stressful occupation related to deleterious physical and psychosocial outcomes in police officers' lives. Spirituality interrelates with every dimension of human functioning and has demonstrated a significant relationship to physical and mental health. This study was concerned with the implication of these conclusions, and addressed a gap in literature that has neglected to bridge these realizations due to limited assessment of spirituality in police officers. Measures of spirituality and police stress in a sample of police officers were collected utilizing two test instruments, and analyzed to determine the relationship. The results indicated a moderate ...


Construing The Outer Limits Of Sentencing Authority: A Proposed Bright-Line Rule For Noncapital Proportionality Review, Kevin White 2011 Brigham Young University Law School

Construing The Outer Limits Of Sentencing Authority: A Proposed Bright-Line Rule For Noncapital Proportionality Review, Kevin White

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Facebook And The Police: Communication In The Social Networking Era, Mari Sakiyama, Deborah K. Shaffer, Joel D. Lieberman 2011 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Facebook And The Police: Communication In The Social Networking Era, Mari Sakiyama, Deborah K. Shaffer, Joel D. Lieberman

Graduate Research Symposium (GCUA)

An increasing number of police departments are using Facebook to communicate with the public. As with any emerging communications technology, there is considerable variation in the usage of this medium. This study reports the results of a content analysis designed to determine how police departments are using Facebook.


Driving Forces: Police Fatalities, Carol Servino 2011 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Driving Forces: Police Fatalities, Carol Servino

Graduate Research Symposium (GCUA)

Law enforcement is an inherently risky occupation. The number of traffic-related fatalities for law enforcement officers in the U.S. during the past 13 years has been increasing; however, the number of fatalities for the general population in motor vehicle traffic incidents declined during the same time period.

The federal government reports that federal motor vehicle safety standards aswell as behavioral and vehicle safety programs implemented by state and local law-enforcement agencies contributed to the downward trend for the general public.

What accounts for the pattern and problem with police driving-related deaths?


Paper For Presentation At The Jpil 2011 Conference In Milan: New Technology, New Problems And New Solutions - Private International Law And The Internet Revisited, Ulf Maunsbach 2011 Lund University, Faculty of Law

Paper For Presentation At The Jpil 2011 Conference In Milan: New Technology, New Problems And New Solutions - Private International Law And The Internet Revisited, Ulf Maunsbach

Ulf Maunsbach

No abstract provided.


The Unjust Application Of Miranda: Berghuis V. Thompinks And Its Inequitable Effects On Minority Populations, Michael O'Neill 2011 Boston College Law School

The Unjust Application Of Miranda: Berghuis V. Thompinks And Its Inequitable Effects On Minority Populations, Michael O'Neill

Boston College Third World Law Journal

In Berghuis v. Thompkins, the U.S. Supreme Court held that in order to invoke the right to remain silent during a custodial interrogation, a criminal suspect must do so clearly and unambiguously. The Court also held that the Thompkins suspect’s conduct during his interrogation— remaining mostly silent for almost three hours before offering three one word responses—was sufficient to indicate waiver of his right to remain silent. This Comment argues that these holdings serve to curtail the rights established in Miranda v. Arizona, in line with the recent direction of the Court’s jurisprudence with respect to ...


Impeding Reentry: Agency And Judicial Obstacles To Longer Halfway House Placements, S. David Mitchell 2011 University of Missouri School of Law

Impeding Reentry: Agency And Judicial Obstacles To Longer Halfway House Placements, S. David Mitchell

Faculty Publications

Part I of this article details the Bureau of Prisons' rules and policies governing inmate placement, including the most recent iteration. Part II examines Chevron27 and the Bureau of Prisons' extraordinary justification exception rule. Part III turns to the threshold matter of obtaining judicial access to challenge the Bureau of Prisons' new rule, with Part III.A arguing that the federal courts should relax their standards when faced with exceptions to the exhaustion requirement and Part III.B arguing for the adoption of a federal public importance exception to the mootness doctrine. The article concludes that these changes will further ...


Sacrificing Quantity For Quality: Better Focusing Prosecutors' Scarce Resources, Stephanos Bibas 2011 University of Pennsylvania

Sacrificing Quantity For Quality: Better Focusing Prosecutors' Scarce Resources, Stephanos Bibas

Faculty Scholarship

This short essay responds to Adam Gershowitz’s and Laura Killinger’s article The State (Never) Rests: How Excessive Prosecutorial Caseloads Harm Criminal Defendants. The authors rightly argue that prosecutorial overwork harms justice in any number of ways: it delays cases, frustrates victims, makes it harder to spot and free innocent defendants, and impedes lowering punishments for sympathetic defendants. The root problem, however, is less about underfunding than about skewed priorities and metrics of success. Too often, prosecutors do not think strategically about using their discretion to proactively set priorities and focus on system-wide tradeoffs. Throwing money at the problem ...


Police Independence And The Military Police, Kent Roach 2011 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Police Independence And The Military Police, Kent Roach

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

This article examines police independence in the context of the military police. The author concludes that the independence of the military police to investigate both Criminal Code and Code of Service Discipline offences should be recognized as part of the unwritten constitutional principle associated with the rule of law and as a principle of fundamental justice under section 7 of the Charter. The author examines the increased recognition of the importance of police investigative independence since the Somalia Inquiry, including the recent expansion of the command authority of the Canadian Forces Provost Marshal over all military police. The relation between ...


Defending Profiling While Combating Racism: A Companion To Ogletree's Presumption Of Guilt, Amos N. Jones 2011 North Carolina Central University School of Law

Defending Profiling While Combating Racism: A Companion To Ogletree's Presumption Of Guilt, Amos N. Jones

North Carolina Central Law Review

No abstract provided.


Prison Ain’T Hell: An Interview With The Son Of Sam—David Berkowitz, And Why State-Funded Faith-Based Prison Rehabilitation Programs Do Not Violate The Establishment Clause, Rebekah Binger 2011 Pace University School of Law

Prison Ain’T Hell: An Interview With The Son Of Sam—David Berkowitz, And Why State-Funded Faith-Based Prison Rehabilitation Programs Do Not Violate The Establishment Clause, Rebekah Binger

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Anatomy Of A Search: Intrusiveness And The Fourth Amendment, Renée McDonald Hutchins 2011 University of Maryland School of Law

The Anatomy Of A Search: Intrusiveness And The Fourth Amendment, Renée Mcdonald Hutchins

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


How United States V. Jones Can Restore Our Faith In The Fourth Amendment, Erica Goldberg 2011 Penn State University Dickinson School of Law

How United States V. Jones Can Restore Our Faith In The Fourth Amendment, Erica Goldberg

Michigan Law Review First Impressions

United States v. Jones, issued in January of this year, is a landmark case that has the potential to restore a property-based interpretation of the Fourth Amendment to prominence. In 1967, the Supreme Court abandoned its previous Fourth Amendment framework, which had viewed the prohibition on unreasonable searches in light of property and trespass laws, and replaced it with a rule protecting the public’s reasonable expectations of privacy. Although the Court may have intended this reasonable expectations test to provide more protection than a test rooted in property law, the new test in fact made the Justices’ subjective views ...


And Death Shall Have No Dominion: How To Achieve The Categorical Exemption Of Mentally Retarded Defendants From Execution, J. Amy Dillard 2011 University of Baltimore School of Law

And Death Shall Have No Dominion: How To Achieve The Categorical Exemption Of Mentally Retarded Defendants From Execution, J. Amy Dillard

All Faculty Scholarship

This article examines the Court’s categorical exclusion of mentally retarded defendants from execution and explores how trial courts should employ procedures to accomplish heightened reliability in the mental retardation determination; it maintains that if a mentally retarded defendant is subjected to a death sentence then the Atkins directive has been ignored. To satisfy the Atkins Court’s objective of protecting mentally retarded defendants from the “special risk of wrongful execution,” the article explores whether trial courts should engage in a unified, pre-trial competency assessment in all capital cases where the defendant asserts mental retardation as a bar to execution ...


Modifying The Restrictions On Sentence Modification: United States V. Cobb, Jackie Bosshardt 2011 Brigham Young University Law School

Modifying The Restrictions On Sentence Modification: United States V. Cobb, Jackie Bosshardt

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Sidestepping Deference: How United States V. Ressam Encourages Overly Stringent Review Of Sentencing Decisions, Joseph Leavitt 2011 Brigham Young University Law School

Sidestepping Deference: How United States V. Ressam Encourages Overly Stringent Review Of Sentencing Decisions, Joseph Leavitt

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Substantially Burdened, Substantially In Conflict, Or Substantially Unneeded? A Discussion Of Abdulhaseeb V. Calbone, D. Evan Pack 2011 Brigham Young University Law School

Substantially Burdened, Substantially In Conflict, Or Substantially Unneeded? A Discussion Of Abdulhaseeb V. Calbone, D. Evan Pack

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Tase Me One More Time: An Analysis Of The Ninth Circuit’S Interpretation Of The Fourth Amendment, Qualified Immunity, And Tasers In Brooks V. City Of Seattle, Joseph G. Walker 2011 Brigham Young University Law School

Tase Me One More Time: An Analysis Of The Ninth Circuit’S Interpretation Of The Fourth Amendment, Qualified Immunity, And Tasers In Brooks V. City Of Seattle, Joseph G. Walker

BYU Law Review

No abstract provided.


El Derecho De Sucesiones Se Debe Atemperar A Los Cambios De La Sociedad Del Siglo Xxi, Edward Ivan Cueva 2011 Selected Works

El Derecho De Sucesiones Se Debe Atemperar A Los Cambios De La Sociedad Del Siglo Xxi, Edward Ivan Cueva

Edward Ivan Cueva

No abstract provided.


The Pitfalls Of Professionalized Prosecution: A Response To Josh Bowers's "Legal Guilt, Normative Innocence, And The Equitable Decision Not To Prosecute", Stephanos Bibas 2011 University of Pennsylvania

The Pitfalls Of Professionalized Prosecution: A Response To Josh Bowers's "Legal Guilt, Normative Innocence, And The Equitable Decision Not To Prosecute", Stephanos Bibas

Faculty Scholarship

This short essay responds to Josh Bowers’ article Legal Guilt, Normative Innocence, and the Equitable Decision Not to Prosecute. While most scholars focus on the most visible injustices in the most serious cases, Bowers rightly notes that this sliver of serious felonies is dwarfed by the mountain of minor, low-visibility misdemeanors and violations. Prosecutors are reasonably good at classifying crimes based on legal guilt and administrative criteria, but are far worse at weighing all the particulars and exercising equitable discretion. Our consistent faith in prosecutors’ expertise, Bowers argues, is not only misguided but backwards; we should value outsiders’ fresh perspectives ...


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