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The Increased Exposure To Coronavirus (Covid-19) For Prisoners Justifies Early Release: And The Wider Implications Of This For Sentencing—Reducing Most Prison Terms Due To The Harsh Incidental Consequences Of Prison, Mirko Bagaric, Peter Isham, Jennifer Svilar 2021 Pepperdine University

The Increased Exposure To Coronavirus (Covid-19) For Prisoners Justifies Early Release: And The Wider Implications Of This For Sentencing—Reducing Most Prison Terms Due To The Harsh Incidental Consequences Of Prison, Mirko Bagaric, Peter Isham, Jennifer Svilar

Pepperdine Law Review

The risk of coronavirus (COVID-19) spreading in prisons is especially acute. This has resulted in an unprecedented number of prisoners being released across the world – including many prisoners in the United States. From the health, social, and political perspectives, this is a sound approach. This is especially the situation in relation to older prisoners and those who have not been imprisoned for serious sexual and violent offenses. Despite the large number of prisoners that are being released, the United States will still have the largest prison population on earth—and by a large margin. However, the coronavirus pandemic and the ...


A Bibliometric Analysis Of Human Trafficking In The Wake Of Natural Disasters, Shashikala Gurpur Dr, Manika Kamthan Dr, Vartika Tiwari Ms. 2021 Symbiosis Law School, Pune

A Bibliometric Analysis Of Human Trafficking In The Wake Of Natural Disasters, Shashikala Gurpur Dr, Manika Kamthan Dr, Vartika Tiwari Ms.

Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal)

This study is based on the bibliometric analysis of research publications that focus on highlighting the interlinkages between natural disasters and human trafficking as its aftermath. The main objectives of the study are to determine the frequency of such publications and also to establish that the problem of trafficking as a result of natural disasters has not received enough attention from the researchers. The data was collected from the Scopus database using VOSviewer software. Literature written from 2000 to October 2020 were perused. The study consisted of a total of 66 documents which are classified into articles, letters, editorials conference ...


Maritime Police Law Of The People’S Republic Of China, Raul (Pete) Pedrozo 2021 U.S. Naval War College

Maritime Police Law Of The People’S Republic Of China, Raul (Pete) Pedrozo

International Law Studies

China’s new Maritime Police Law (MPL) purports to regulate the duties of China’s maritime police agencies, including the China Coast Guard, and safeguard China’s sovereignty, security, and rights and interest. The MPL has potentially far-reaching application, as China claims extensive maritime areas off its mainland and in the South China Sea. This expansive application of maritime law enforcement jurisdiction is problematic given that most of China’s maritime claims are inconsistent with international law. To the extent that the MPL purports to assert jurisdiction over foreign flagged vessels in disputed areas or on the high seas, it ...


Thirteenth Amendment Litigation In The Immigration Detention Context, Jennifer Safstrom 2021 Georgetown University Law Center

Thirteenth Amendment Litigation In The Immigration Detention Context, Jennifer Safstrom

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

This Article analyzes how the Thirteenth Amendment has been used to prevent forced labor practices in immigration detention. The Article assesses the effectiveness of Thirteenth Amendment litigation by dissecting cases where detainees have challenged the legality of labor requirements under the Trafficking Victims Protection Act. Given the expansion in immigration detention, the increasing privatization of detention, and the significant human rights implications of this issue, the arguments advanced in this Article are not only currently relevant but have the potential to shape ongoing dialogue on this subject.


Rethinking The Reasonable Response: Safeguarding The Promise Of Kingsley For Conditions Of Confinement, Hanna Rutkowski 2021 University of Michigan Law School

Rethinking The Reasonable Response: Safeguarding The Promise Of Kingsley For Conditions Of Confinement, Hanna Rutkowski

Michigan Law Review

Nearly five million individuals are admitted to America’s jails each year, and at any given time, two-thirds of those held in jail have not been convicted of a crime. Under current Supreme Court doctrine, these pretrial detainees are functionally protected by the same standard as convicted prisoners, despite the fact that they are formally protected by different constitutional amendments. A 2015 decision, Kingsley v. Hendrickson, declared that a different standard would apply to pretrial detainees and convicted prisoners in the context of use of force: consistent with the Constitution’s mandate that they not be punished at all, pretrial ...


Protesting In America, Timothy Zick 2021 William & Mary Law School

Protesting In America, Timothy Zick

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Undemocratic Crimes, Paul H. Robinson, Jonathan C. Wilt 2021 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Undemocratic Crimes, Paul H. Robinson, Jonathan C. Wilt

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

One might assume that in a working democracy the criminal law rules would reflect the community’s shared judgments regarding justice and punishment. This is especially true because social science research shows that lay people generally think about criminal liability and punishment in consistent ways: in terms of desert, doing justice and avoiding injustice. Moreover, there are compelling arguments for demanding consistency between community views and criminal law rules based upon the importance of democratic values, effective crime-control, and the deontological value of justice itself.

It may then come as a surprise, and a disappointment, that a wide range of ...


Particular Amenability To Probation And The Trog Factors: Rewarding Wealth And Subservience In Minnesota Criminal Sentencing, Sean Cahill 2021 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Particular Amenability To Probation And The Trog Factors: Rewarding Wealth And Subservience In Minnesota Criminal Sentencing, Sean Cahill

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Pandemic Of Inequality: An Introduction To Inequality Of Race, Wealth, And Class, Equality Of Opportunity, Dr. Charles J. Reid, Jr. 2021 University of St. Thomas School of Law, Minnesota

Pandemic Of Inequality: An Introduction To Inequality Of Race, Wealth, And Class, Equality Of Opportunity, Dr. Charles J. Reid, Jr.

University of St. Thomas Journal of Law and Public Policy

No abstract provided.


Transformational Leadership, Conflict Management Style, And Job Satisfaction In Law Enforcement, Giuseppe Alise 2021 Seton Hall University

Transformational Leadership, Conflict Management Style, And Job Satisfaction In Law Enforcement, Giuseppe Alise

Seton Hall University Dissertations and Theses (ETDs)

Abstract

Effective leaders are essential for any organization, including law enforcement. Police work is not free from the challenges of leadership, confronted with its own unique challenges, including developing ways to adapt to rapid change and continually having to adjust to various political and environmental factors.

This research is an in-depth examination of how transformational leadership and conflict management style drive job satisfaction in law enforcement. The goal is to determine whether employee satisfaction achieved through transformational leadership is, in fact, largely the result of how leadership handles conflict. The idea is to disentangle the relationship between transformational leadership and ...


Wage Theft Criminalization, Benjamin Levin 2021 University of Colorado Law School

Wage Theft Criminalization, Benjamin Levin

Articles

Over the past decade, workers’ rights activists and legal scholars have embraced the language of “wage theft” in describing the abuses of the contemporary workplace. The phrase invokes a certain moral clarity: theft is wrong. The phrase is not merely a rhetorical flourish. Increasingly, it has a specific content for activists, politicians, advocates, and academics: wage theft speaks the language of criminal law, and wage theft is a crime that should be punished. Harshly. Self-proclaimed “progressive prosecutors” have made wage theft cases a priority, and left-leaning politicians in the United States and abroad have begun to propose more criminal statutes ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2021 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


A World Of Difference? Law Enforcement, Genetic Data, And The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin, J. W. Hazel 2021 Vanderbilt University Law School

A World Of Difference? Law Enforcement, Genetic Data, And The Fourth Amendment, Christopher Slobogin, J. W. Hazel

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Law enforcement agencies are increasingly turning to genetic databases as a way of solving crime, either through requesting the DNA profile of an identified suspect from a database or, more commonly, by matching crime scene DNA with DNA profiles in a database in an attempt to identify a suspect or a family member of a suspect. Neither of these efforts implicates the Fourth Amendment, because the Supreme Court has held that a Fourth Amendment "search" does not occur unless police infringe "expectations of privacy society is prepared to recognize as reasonable" and has construed that phrase narrowly, without reference to ...


From Banned Books To Mail Censorship, Free Speech All But Ends At The Prison Doors, Meghan Holden 2021 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

From Banned Books To Mail Censorship, Free Speech All But Ends At The Prison Doors, Meghan Holden

Mitchell Hamline Law Journal of Public Policy and Practice

No abstract provided.


Women’S Votes, Women’S Voices, And The Limits Of Criminal Justice Reform, 1911–1950, Carolyn B. Ramsey 2021 University of Colorado Law School

Women’S Votes, Women’S Voices, And The Limits Of Criminal Justice Reform, 1911–1950, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

Deriving its vigor from the work of grassroots organizations at the state and local levels, the League of Women Voters (LWV) sought, in the first half of the twentieth century, to provide newly enfranchised women with a political education to strengthen their voice in public affairs. Local branches like the San Francisco Center learned from experience—through practical involvement in a variety of social welfare and criminal justice initiatives. This Article, written for a symposium commemorating the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, assesses the role of LWV leaders in California and especially San Francisco in reforming three aspects of the ...


Sanctuary Cities And The Power Of The Purse: An Executive Dole Test, Douglas M. Spencer 2021 University of Colorado Law School

Sanctuary Cities And The Power Of The Purse: An Executive Dole Test, Douglas M. Spencer

Articles

A constitutional clash is brewing. Cities and counties are flexing their muscles to frustrate national immigration policy while the federal Executive is threatening to interfere with local law enforcement decision making and funding. Although the federal government generally has plenary authority over immigration law, the Constitution forbids the commandeering of state and local officials to enforce federal law against their will. One exception to this anti-commandeering principle is the Spending Clause of Article I that permits Congress to condition the receipt of federal funds on compliance with federal law. These conditions, according to more than 30 years of Supreme Court ...


Sex Offenders And The Free Exercise Of Religion, Christopher C. Lund 2021 Wayne State University

Sex Offenders And The Free Exercise Of Religion, Christopher C. Lund

Law Faculty Research Publications

No abstract provided.


The Two Percent: How Florida’S Capital Punishment System Defies The Eighth Amendment, Sofia Perla 2021 Florida International University College of Law

The Two Percent: How Florida’S Capital Punishment System Defies The Eighth Amendment, Sofia Perla

FIU Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beyond Qualified Immunity, Fred O. Smith Jr. 2021 Emory University School of Law

Beyond Qualified Immunity, Fred O. Smith Jr.

Michigan Law Review Online

I never watched the video. The descriptions themselves have always felt like enough. Traumatizing enough. Invasive enough. George Floyd, father of two, laying on the ground, as an unfazed officer kneeled on his neck for at least eight minutes and forty-six seconds. He pleaded for his life and cried out to his deceased mother until he met his inevitable death. His name should be said for the record before saying almost anything else. The recording of the chilling final minutes of his life is, in all probability, one of the impetuses for this multi-journal Reckoning and Reform Symposium.


“Juveniles Are Different”: Easier Said Than Done Resolving Disparities Among Courts Regarding The Constitutionality Of Sentencing Juveniles To De Facto Life-Without-Parole, Audrey Fernandez 2021 FIU College of Law

“Juveniles Are Different”: Easier Said Than Done Resolving Disparities Among Courts Regarding The Constitutionality Of Sentencing Juveniles To De Facto Life-Without-Parole, Audrey Fernandez

FIU Law Review

No abstract provided.


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