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Human Trafficking And Local Law Enforcement, Elizabeth Chesbrough 2018 Bowling Green State University

Human Trafficking And Local Law Enforcement, Elizabeth Chesbrough

Honors Projects

“To protect our kids, we’ve given law enforcement new tools to fight human trafficking (Brett Guthrie).” Though Brett’s hopeful sentiment portrays a police force that is ready to battle the epidemic of modern day slavery, research has shown that local officers are sorely uneducated on the subject. The main focus of this paper is the link between the prevalence of human trafficking in the U.S. and the lack of local law enforcement training on the issue. The first section will be a brief overview of human trafficking, defining and discussing a few relevant details about it first ...


Correcting Correctional Suicide: Qualified Immunity And The Hurdles To Comprehensive Inmate Suicide Prevention, Venus Chui 2018 Boston College Law School

Correcting Correctional Suicide: Qualified Immunity And The Hurdles To Comprehensive Inmate Suicide Prevention, Venus Chui

Boston College Law Review

Suicide is the leading cause of death in U.S. jails, and the second leading cause of death in U.S. prisons. Suicidal behavior among inmates largely stems from the custodial environment and inmates’ difficulties coping with incarceration. Unfortunately, many correctional facilities lack the comprehensive suicide prevention policies necessary to reduce inmate suicides. Under the qualified immunity doctrine, current law also shields correctional authorities from liability for failure to implement adequate suicide prevention programs in their facilities. As a result, corrections officials lack incentive to enhance their efforts toward reducing inmate suicides, and families of inmate suicide victims have limited ...


Legal Limbo: The Fifth Circuit's Decision In Turner V. Driver Fails To Clarify The Contours Of The Public's First Amendment Right To Record The Police, Stephanie Johnson 2018 Boston College Law School

Legal Limbo: The Fifth Circuit's Decision In Turner V. Driver Fails To Clarify The Contours Of The Public's First Amendment Right To Record The Police, Stephanie Johnson

Boston College Law Review

On February 16, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, in Turner v. Driver, held that the public has a First Amendment right to record the police that is subject only to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions. Although Turner established that the public has a First Amendment right to film the police, the decision skirted the question of whether the particular conduct in Turner—video recording police activity and/or video recording the police station—was an activity protected by the First Amendment. This Comment argues that the Fifth Circuit erred in not clarifying the ...


Cementing Good Law By Tolerating Bad Outcomes: Examining The Eighth Circuit's Commitment To Upholding The Defense Of Qualified Immunity For Prison Officials In Kulkay V. Roy, Peter Diliberti 2018 Boston College Law School

Cementing Good Law By Tolerating Bad Outcomes: Examining The Eighth Circuit's Commitment To Upholding The Defense Of Qualified Immunity For Prison Officials In Kulkay V. Roy, Peter Diliberti

Boston College Law Review

On February 2, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit decided Kulkay v. Roy and affirmed the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota’s dismissal of plaintiff’s civil rights claims under the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments. The plaintiff, a former inmate at a Minnesota correctional facility, sued the correctional facility and related officials for failing to install safety features on a piece of machinery and not providing him with adequate usage training after he suffered damage to his hand while operating the beam saw. The district court held that the plaintiff inmate ...


The Prison To Homelessness Pipeline: Criminal Record Checks, Race, And Disparate Impact, Valerie Schneider 2018 Howard University School of Law

The Prison To Homelessness Pipeline: Criminal Record Checks, Race, And Disparate Impact, Valerie Schneider

Indiana Law Journal

Study after study has shown that securing housing upon release from prison is critical to reducing the likelihood of recidivism,1 yet those with criminal records— a population that disproportionately consists of racial minorities—are routinely denied access to housing, even if their offense was minor and was shown to have no bearing on whether the applicant would be likely to be a successful renter. In April of 2016, the Office of General Counsel for the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) issued much anticipated guidance dealing directly with the racially disparate impact of barring those with ...


Conflicting Approaches To Addressing Ex-Offender Unemployment: The Work Opportunity Tax Credit And Ban The Box, Katherine English 2018 Indiana University

Conflicting Approaches To Addressing Ex-Offender Unemployment: The Work Opportunity Tax Credit And Ban The Box, Katherine English

Indiana Law Journal

Each year, roughly 700,000 prisoners are released from their six-by-eight-foot cells and back into society. Sadly, though, many of these ex-prisoners are not truly free. Upon returning to society, they often encounter several challenges that prevent them from resuming a normal, reintegrated lifestyle. For many, the difficulties associated with reentry prove to be too much, and within a short three years of their release, two-thirds of ex-offenders are rearrested, reconvicted, and thrown back into the familiar six-by-eight-foot cell. Recidivism might appear to be entirely the exoffenders’ fault, but ex-offenders are not solely responsible for these recidivism rates or the ...


Getting It Righted: Access To Counsel In Rapid Removals, Kari E. Hong, Stephen Manning 2018 Boston College Law School

Getting It Righted: Access To Counsel In Rapid Removals, Kari E. Hong, Stephen Manning

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Rapid removals — the catchall phrase for expedited removal, reinstatement of removal, and administrative orders — have been devastatingly efficient, accounting for 76 percent of all removals that have occurred in the past 20 years. That means that 4.2 million people have been ordered out of the country without a hearing, without a judge, without an appeal, and without an attorney. In 2014, President Obama made a political calculus to push asylum seekers, mostly mothers with their children fleeing from Central America, out of the country within 10 to 15 days to deter others from seeking protection in the United States ...


Reassessing Prosecutorial Power Through The Lens Of Mass Incarceration, Jeffrey Bellin 2018 William & Mary Law School

Reassessing Prosecutorial Power Through The Lens Of Mass Incarceration, Jeffrey Bellin

Michigan Law Review

A review of John F. Pfaff, Locked In: The True Causes of Mass Incarceration - And How to Achieve Real Reform.


A New Mens Rea For Rape: More Convictions And Less Punishment, Kari E. Hong 2018 Boston College Law School

A New Mens Rea For Rape: More Convictions And Less Punishment, Kari E. Hong

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

There is no doubt that the law of rape is in need of reform. Compared to other crimes, reported rapes are convicted at 1/3 the rate of robberies and 1/6 the rate of assaults. Because knowing the identity of an assailant should lead to more, not fewer, convictions, this low conviction rate then is surprising given that acquaintance rapes—where the attacker is known to the victim—account for 80% of all rapes. Criminal law serves a vital purpose when it can clearly define criminal conduct and separate it from lawful activity. To effectively draw this line, criminal ...


Police Lineups And Eyewitness Identification, Alessandra Ricigliano 2018 Merrimack College

Police Lineups And Eyewitness Identification, Alessandra Ricigliano

Honors Senior Capstone Projects

Improper police lineups often lead to the misidentification of a suspect in particular cases. These mistakes could potentially have detrimental effects on someone’s freedom because eyewitness identifications hold so much weight in court proceedings. If a witness or victim is certain they can identify the suspect, jurors are likely to believe them whether the witness is right or wrong. Eyewitness misidentification is one of the leading causes of wrongful convictions (The Innocence Project, 2017). The current research employs qualitative in depth interviews with police officers from local and state departments. The interviews asked about police procedures for conducting simultaneous ...


Policing, Technology, And Doctrinal Assists, Bennett Capers 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Policing, Technology, And Doctrinal Assists, Bennett Capers

Florida Law Review

Sounding the alarm about technology, policing, and privacy has become an almost daily occurrence. We are told that the government’s use of technology as a surveillance tool is an “insidious assault on our freedom.” That it is “nearly impossible to live today without generating thousands of records about what we watch, read, buy and do—and the government has access to them.” The message is clear. Big Brother is watching. And we should be afraid.

But the police use of technology, or what this Article terms “techno-policing,” does not have to be dystopian. This Article challenges conventional thinking and ...


If Technology Is The Hare, Is Congress The Tortoise? Split Circuits In The Wake Of Dahda, Michael Koch 2018 Boston College Law School

If Technology Is The Hare, Is Congress The Tortoise? Split Circuits In The Wake Of Dahda, Michael Koch

Boston College Law Review

In United States v. Dahda, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit held that, under Title III of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (“Title III”), the lower court properly denied Dahda’s motion to suppress evidence gathered by law enforcement using a mobile interception device—a device that wiretaps cell phones. A key part of the decision focused on the definition of mobile interception devices. The Tenth Circuit defined them as devices used to intercept communications that are movable. The Seventh Circuit, in contrast, has defined mobile interception devices as devices used ...


Excessive Force, Police Dogs, And The Fourth Amendment In The Ninth Circuit: The Use Of Summary Judgement In Lowry V. City Of San Diego, Natasha Dobrott 2018 Boston College Law School

Excessive Force, Police Dogs, And The Fourth Amendment In The Ninth Circuit: The Use Of Summary Judgement In Lowry V. City Of San Diego, Natasha Dobrott

Boston College Law Review

On June 6, 2017, in Lowry v. City of San Diego, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit sitting en banc upheld a district court’s grant of summary judgment, dismissing a claim under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 for use of excessive force in violation of the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, in the context of “bite and hold” training for police dogs. This Comment argues that although the use of force in Lowry may have been reasonable, the court was incorrect in deciding this question as a matter of law. The fact-intensive objective ...


The Grand Jury: A Shield Of A Different Sort, R. Michael Cassidy, Julian A. Cook III 2018 Boston College Law School

The Grand Jury: A Shield Of A Different Sort, R. Michael Cassidy, Julian A. Cook Iii

R. Michael Cassidy

According to the Washington Post, 991 people were shot to death by police officers in the United States during calendar year 2015, and 957 people were fatally shot in 2016. A disproportionate percentage of the citizens killed in these police-civilian encounters were black. Events in Ferguson, Missouri; Chicago, Illinois; Charlotte, North Carolina; Baton Rouge, Louisiana; and Staten Island, New York - to name but a few affected cities - have now exposed deep distrust between communities of color and law enforcement. Greater transparency is necessary to begin to heal this culture of distrust and to inform the debate going forward about police ...


Dignity Restoration And The Chicago Police Torture Reparations Ordinance, Andrew S. Baer 2018 University of Alabama at Birmingham

Dignity Restoration And The Chicago Police Torture Reparations Ordinance, Andrew S. Baer

Chicago-Kent Law Review

A recent municipal ordinance giving reparations to survivors of police torture in Chicago represents an unprecedented effort by a city government to repair damage wrought by decades of police violence. Between 1972 and 1991, white detectives under Commander Jon Burge tortured confessions from over 118 black criminal suspects on the city’s South and West Sides. Responding to the needs of affected communities, a coalition of torture survivors, their families, civil rights attorneys, and community activists pushed the reparations bill through the City Council on May 6, 2015. Representing the holistic approach favored by survivors, the $5 million reparations package ...


Gutting The Fourth Amendment: Judicial Complicity In Racial Profiling And The Real-Life Implications, Mary N. Beall 2018 University of Minnesota Law School

Gutting The Fourth Amendment: Judicial Complicity In Racial Profiling And The Real-Life Implications, Mary N. Beall

Law & Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Have We Outgrown Brown? 02-06-2018, Michael M. Bowden 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Newsroom: Have We Outgrown Brown? 02-06-2018, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Progress Toward National Estimates Of Police Use Of Force, Joel H. Garner, Matthew J. Hickman, Ronald W. Malega, Christopher D. Maxwell 2018 Portland State University

Progress Toward National Estimates Of Police Use Of Force, Joel H. Garner, Matthew J. Hickman, Ronald W. Malega, Christopher D. Maxwell

Criminology and Criminal Justice Faculty Publications and Presentations

This research builds on three decades of effort to produce national estimates of the amount and rate of force used by law enforcement officers in the United States. Prior efforts to produce national estimates have suffered from poor and inconsistent measurements of force, small and unrepresentative samples, low survey and/or item response rates, and disparate reporting of rates of force. The present study employs data from a nationally representative survey of state and local law enforcement agencies that has a high survey response rate as well as a relatively high rate of reporting uses of force. Using data on ...


“Warning: Use May Result In Cruel And Unusual Punishment”: How Administrative Law And Adequate Warning Labels Can Bring About The Demise Of Lethal Injection, Julia Eaton 2018 Boston College Law School

“Warning: Use May Result In Cruel And Unusual Punishment”: How Administrative Law And Adequate Warning Labels Can Bring About The Demise Of Lethal Injection, Julia Eaton

Boston College Law Review

Lethal injection, although currently the preferred method of execution in the United States, causes more botched executions than any other method. Despite recorded instances of extreme pain and suffering, the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) does not regulate lethal injection drugs for safety and effectiveness because their use occurs “off-label” and thus outside of the purview of the FDA’s regulatory scope. Challengers to the FDA’s lack of regulation have thus far been unsuccessful in the courts due to the deference that the courts give to agency decisions. This Note discusses the ways in which administrative law ...


Hb 280 - Campus Carry, Taylor Morgan Koshak, Nicholas J. Roger 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 280 - Campus Carry, Taylor Morgan Koshak, Nicholas J. Roger

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act broadens lawful gun owners’ rights by allowing weapons carry license holders to carry concealed guns on property owned or leased by public institutions of postsecondary education. The Act creates exceptions for sporting events, student housing, childcare spaces, classes for a college and career academy and other specialized schools, classrooms for dual enrollment programs, and spaces for administrative disciplinary proceedings. The law creates a misdemeanor penalty for noncompliance, and provides definitions for clarification.


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