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The Impact Of The Current Economy On Access To Justice, Kathleen A. McKee 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Impact Of The Current Economy On Access To Justice, Kathleen A. Mckee

Maine Law Review

The adequacy of access to justice in the American legal system is not a newly emergent issue. Discussion acknowledging this right dates back to colonial times. For example, in 1932, the United States Supreme Court noted in the case of Powell v. Alabama that the right to counsel in criminal proceedings can be traced back to colonial times in America. The Court remarked that the right to be heard must encompass the right to be heard by counsel if it is to be meaningful. In the ongoing dialogue on this issue, primacy has been given to the right of criminal ...


Reflections Of An Access To Justice Chair, Kermit V. Lipez 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Reflections Of An Access To Justice Chair, Kermit V. Lipez

Maine Law Review

From January 2001 to January 2008, I had the privilege of serving as the Chair of Maine’s Justice Action Group. In the legal services world, the Justice Action Group is known as an “Access to Justice” entity. Most states have such entities. Although the missions of these entities may vary somewhat from state to state, they share the same general goals—to increase the resources available to the organizations providing free or reduced fee legal services to low income, disadvantaged, and elderly citizens, and to maximize the use of these resources through coordinated efforts. In Maine, the Justice Action ...


A Foundation Upon Which Justice Is Built: The Chicago Bar Foundation's Innovations To Improve Access To Justice During Tough Economic Times, Danielle Elyce Hirsch 2017 University of Maine School of Law

A Foundation Upon Which Justice Is Built: The Chicago Bar Foundation's Innovations To Improve Access To Justice During Tough Economic Times, Danielle Elyce Hirsch

Maine Law Review

“Equal justice for all” is one of the United States’ most proudly proclaimed principles, embellished on courthouse entrances and regularly cited in constitutional decisions. The Illinois Constitution also contains a strong commitment to equal and unimpeded access to our legal system for all of our citizens: “Every person shall find a certain remedy in the laws for all injuries and wrongs which he receives to his person, privacy, property or reputation. He shall obtain justice by law, freely, completely and promptly.” Notwithstanding these constitutional principles, a large number of people with urgent and important issues at stake—such as the ...


Access To Prescription Drugs: A Normative Economic Approach To Pharmacist Conscience Clause Legislation, Joanna K. Sax 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Access To Prescription Drugs: A Normative Economic Approach To Pharmacist Conscience Clause Legislation, Joanna K. Sax

Maine Law Review

Over the past several years, many states introduced legislation that protects a pharmacist’s decision to refuse to fill a prescription. Termed “conscience clauses,” these pieces of legislation allow a pharmacist to refuse to fill a prescription because of moral or religious objections without fear of legal repercussions. In 2006, for example, twenty-one states considered legislation that permits pharmacists to refuse to fill prescriptions; some bills focus on contraception alone, while others are not specific to any one type of medication. Arkansas, Mississippi, Georgia, Florida, and South Dakota have state laws that provide legal protection to pharmacists who refuse to ...


Reflections On Forty Years Of Private Practice And Sustained Pro Bono Advocacy, Stephen H. Oleskey 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Reflections On Forty Years Of Private Practice And Sustained Pro Bono Advocacy, Stephen H. Oleskey

Maine Law Review

I am going to address two topics. The first is the one Judge Coffin asked me to address in October 2009, when I was invited to give the 2010 Coffin Lecture: how to combine the private practice of law with an active pro bono practice. The second topic is the one Dean Peter Pitegoff and I agreed to add: a brief discussion of legal developments in national security law since 9/11. My pro bono involvement in Guantanamo Habeas litigation began in 2004 and led directly to my interest in national security law and to my recognition of how difficult ...


The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt

Maine Law Review

The Authors of this Article are engaged in a separate project to publish the full collection of law-related speeches delivered by Judge Coffin during his tenure on the bench. That collection in its entirety consists of more than 125 speeches, and it is a treasure trove of thoughts on the judiciary as an institution, the law, judging, the legal profession, legal education, and legal luminaries past and present. The speeches are also worthy of study purely as examples of communication, advocacy, speechcraft, composition, humor, and whimsy. Within the confines of this Article, the modest goal is to provide samples of ...


Transforming News: How Mediation Principles Can Depolarize Public Talk, Carol Pauli 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Transforming News: How Mediation Principles Can Depolarize Public Talk, Carol Pauli

Carol Pauli

News media interviews bring opposing voices into the public forum where, ideally, audience members can deliberate and reach democratic compromise. But in today’s politically polarized atmosphere, partisans increasingly accuse each other of being a threat to the country, and prospects for compromise have suffered. Journalists have been urged to take a more affirmative role, promoting problem-solving and opposing conflict. They have stopped short, citing professional norms that demand a stance of neutral detachment. This Article turns to the principles of transformative mediation. Like journalism, it is detached from any goal of settlement. It aims instead at increasing the capacity ...


Whole Other Story: Applying Narrative Mediation To The Immigration Beat, Carol Pauli 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Whole Other Story: Applying Narrative Mediation To The Immigration Beat, Carol Pauli

Carol Pauli

If Donald Trump, kicking off his campaign for the White House, was saying “what everyone is thinking,” about illegal immigration, it must be that his message mirrored a narrative that already existed in the minds of his audience. That fearful story of criminals invading the U.S. borders has long been a dominant theme in the mainstream news immigration story. Like all news stories, this one focuses attention on some facts at the expense of others. Like many news stories, it draws its power from earlier, well-known tales — some as old as the Flood. This article recommends that the news ...


What Churches Can Expect From "Gay Rights" Laws: A Preview Of Iowa's Sexual Orientation Bill, Lincoln C. Oliphant 2017 St. John's University School of Law

What Churches Can Expect From "Gay Rights" Laws: A Preview Of Iowa's Sexual Orientation Bill, Lincoln C. Oliphant

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Is Wall Between Church And State Crumbling? 10-10-2017, Diana Hassel 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Newsroom: Is Wall Between Church And State Crumbling? 10-10-2017, Diana Hassel

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Rwu First Amendment Blog: Diana Hassel's Blog: Is The Wall Between Church And State Crumbling? 10-07-2017, Diana Hassel 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Rwu First Amendment Blog: Diana Hassel's Blog: Is The Wall Between Church And State Crumbling? 10-07-2017, Diana Hassel

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


Second Class For The Second Time: How The Commercial Speech Doctrine Stigmatizes Commercial Use Of Aggregated Public Records, Brian N. Larson, Genelle I. Belmas 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Second Class For The Second Time: How The Commercial Speech Doctrine Stigmatizes Commercial Use Of Aggregated Public Records, Brian N. Larson, Genelle I. Belmas

Brian Larson

This Article argues that access to aggregated electronic public records for commercial use should receive protection under the First Amendment in the same measure as the speech acts the access supports. In other words, we view commercial access to aggregated public records as an essential means to valuable speech. For many, however, the taint of the commercial speech doctrine is turning all “information flows” into commercial ones. This, in turn, is threatening the access to government records.


Guns On Campus: A Look At The First Year Of Concealed Carry At Texas Universities, Aric K. Short 2017 Texas A&M University School of Law

Guns On Campus: A Look At The First Year Of Concealed Carry At Texas Universities, Aric K. Short

Aric Short

No abstract provided.


The Teachings Of Pope Francis Symposium: Toward A Common Good For Our Common Home, Steven W. Bender 2017 Seattle University School of Law

The Teachings Of Pope Francis Symposium: Toward A Common Good For Our Common Home, Steven W. Bender

Seattle University Law Review

Prompted by the teachings of Pope Francis conveyed through such writings as the Evangelii gaudium and Laudato si’, the symposium—titled The Teachings of Pope Francis: Towards a Vision of Social Justice and Sustainable Capitalism?—brought an impressive and diverse array of interdisciplinary scholars to Seattle University School of Law in February 2017. Speakers included economists, law professors, and theologians with a wide array of expertise on daunting policy issues facing the Global South and North. Fittingly, a Jesuit law school with a diverse faculty hosted the symposium centering, critiquing, and expanding the teachings of the first Jesuit Pope. Many ...


Social Justice And The American Law School Today: Since We Are Made For Love, Michael Kaufman 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Social Justice And The American Law School Today: Since We Are Made For Love, Michael Kaufman

Seattle University Law Review

This Article is intended to facilitate that new dialogue by finding a series of profound provocations in the Pope’s teachings. First, the Pope provokes us to consider whether our existing education and economic systems are based on an incomplete understanding of human nature.5 The first section contends that the understanding that human beings are by nature competitive and consumptive wealth maximizers is not only contrary to the Pope’s teachings but also contrary to the latest research in the fields of neuroscience, neuro-psychology, cognitive psychology, educational psychology, economics, and behavioral economics. Second, the Pope provokes us to consider ...


Social Justice And Capitalism: An Assessment Of The Teachings Of Pope Francis From A Law And Macroeconomics Perspective, Steven A. Ramirez 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Social Justice And Capitalism: An Assessment Of The Teachings Of Pope Francis From A Law And Macroeconomics Perspective, Steven A. Ramirez

Seattle University Law Review

The first part of this Article will synthesize the key teachings of Pope Francis from his most important statements on economic structures and social justice and situate these teachings within contemporary economic realities and traditional social justice teachings. Part II of this Article will demonstrate that the Pope’s teachings on social justice fundamentally reflect the best learning from economists on how to sustain economic growth. Part III of this Article will show that nations that undertake policies to pursue the fundamental tenets of the Pope’s teachings (such as minimizing childhood poverty) also perform the best in achieving high ...


A Critique Of Pope Francis’S Laudato Si’, Nicholas Capaldi 2017 Seattle University School of Law

A Critique Of Pope Francis’S Laudato Si’, Nicholas Capaldi

Seattle University Law Review

This is a critique of Pope Francis’s encyclical Laudato si’. The author summarizes and examines Pope Francis’s description of the problem, analysis of the roots of the problem, and proposed solution of the problem within the context of the Roman Catholic tradition. The author concludes that the encyclical abandons rigorous argument, as it lists complaints without offering substantive alternatives.


Mercy Versus Fear, Or Where The Law On Migration Stands, Gilbert Paul Carrasco, Iryna Zaverukha 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Mercy Versus Fear, Or Where The Law On Migration Stands, Gilbert Paul Carrasco, Iryna Zaverukha

Seattle University Law Review

The theme of this Article contrasts the perspective of Papa Francisco on the subject of migration, juxtaposing his blueprint of mercy as the point of departure, with the oppositional resistance, which is based on various dimensions of fear. This perspective will be contextualized within the framework of both American immigration law and within the parameters of international human rights and transnational migration. Part I of this Article will consider the paradigm of mercy and fear in light of the various provisions of federal American immigration law in their historical context. It will recount many of the restrictive and nativist episodes ...


Laudato Si’: Engaging Islamic Tradition And Implications For Legal Thought, Russell Powell 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Laudato Si’: Engaging Islamic Tradition And Implications For Legal Thought, Russell Powell

Seattle University Law Review

This Essay considers the 2015 papal encyclical Laudato si’s engagement with Islamic religious and legal traditions in order to identify shared ethical and jurisprudential commitments and their broader implications for law. By 2025, Muslims will constitute 30% of the population of the world, while Catholics will likely be between 15% and 20%. The history of interreligious conflict is long and enduring. In many cases, legal structures related to security and immigration have exacerbated these tensions, prompting uncertainty and instability.5 Laudato si’ is a strategic document, intended to address climate change, increasing economic inequity, and interreligious conflict by opening ...


A Cosmopolitan Church Confronts Right-Wing Populism, Vincent Rougeau 2017 Seattle University School of Law

A Cosmopolitan Church Confronts Right-Wing Populism, Vincent Rougeau

Seattle University Law Review

Are all human beings of equal moral worth? If so, does this proposition generate moral obligations to others that transcend national and cultural boundaries? Cosmopolitans would answer yes to each of these questions, as would Pope Francis and Catholic Social Teaching (CST). Given our interconnected economic system, a global perspective on justice is not only pragmatic but also morally essential. In recent years, however, what had been an emerging consensus centered on a cosmopolitan view of the reciprocal responsibilities of nations has been stifled by a rising tide of nationalism and right-wing populism. As a right-wing populist leader of a ...


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