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The Impact Of Cultural Heritage On Japanese Towns And Villages, Yuichiro Tsuji Dr. 2020 University of Tsukuba

The Impact Of Cultural Heritage On Japanese Towns And Villages, Yuichiro Tsuji Dr.

Seattle Journal of Technology, Environmental & Innovation Law

In 1954, when historically significant clays and clay pots were found in the Iba district of Shizuoka prefecture, the city applied to the prefectural education committee for a historic site designation. The committee granted this designation to the city..

However, in 1973 the education committee lifted its permission to promote development around the location. Historians have sought revocation of this decision under the Administrative Case Litigation Act (ACLA), but the Supreme Court has denied standing. By denying standing, the Japanese Supreme Court allows the prefecture to destroy a historical site.

First, this paper seeks to discuss the doctrine of standing ...


Responsible Energy Storage For A Renewable Electrical Grid, Matt Longacre 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Responsible Energy Storage For A Renewable Electrical Grid, Matt Longacre

Seattle Journal of Technology, Environmental & Innovation Law

The United States economy, its national security, and even the health and safety of its citizens depend on reliably available electricity. Electricity is largely available through the grid – more than 9,200 generating units, capable of generating more than one terawatt of electricity, connected to more than 600,000 miles of wire. The grid extends to nearly everything: from charging cellphones to cellphone towers, from light emitting diodes to street lights, and from parking meters to electric cars; the grid has become ubiquitous.

The current grid infrastructure has been valued at two trillion dollars, but much of it is aging ...


Policing The Wombs Of The World's Women: The Mexico City Policy, Samantha Lalisan 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Policing The Wombs Of The World's Women: The Mexico City Policy, Samantha Lalisan

Indiana Law Journal

This Comment argues that the Policy should be repealed because it undermines

firmly held First Amendment values and would be considered unconstitutional if

applied to domestic nongovernmental organizations (DNGOs). It proceeds in four

parts. Part I describes the inception of the Policy and contextualizes it among other

antiabortion policies that resulted as a backlash to the U.S. Supreme Court’s

landmark decision in Roe v. Wade. Part II explains the Policy’s actual effect on

FNGOs, particularly focusing on organizations based in Nepal and Peru, and argues

that the Policy undermines democratic processes abroad and fails to achieve its ...


Healthcare Licensing And Liability, Benjamin McMichael 2020 University of Alabama School of Law

Healthcare Licensing And Liability, Benjamin Mcmichael

Indiana Law Journal

The United States’ affordable care crisis and chronic physician shortage have

required advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and physician assistants

(PAs) to assume increasingly important roles in the healthcare system. The increased

use of these nonphysician providers has improved access to healthcare and lowered

the price of care. However, restrictive occupational licensing laws—specifically,

scope-of-practice laws—have limited their ability to care for patients. While these

laws, by themselves, have important implications for the healthcare system, they also

interact with other legal regimes to impact the provision of care. Restrictive scopeof-

practice laws can increase the malpractice liability risk of ...


The Kavanaugh Court And The Schechter-To-Chevron Spectrum: How The New Supreme Court Will Make The Administrative State More Democratically Accountable, Justin Walker 2020 University of Louisville School of Law

The Kavanaugh Court And The Schechter-To-Chevron Spectrum: How The New Supreme Court Will Make The Administrative State More Democratically Accountable, Justin Walker

Indiana Law Journal

In a typical year, Congress passes roughly 800 pages of law—that’s about a seveninch

stack of paper. But in the same year, federal administrative agencies promulgate

80,000 pages of regulations—which makes an eleven-foot paper pillar. This move

toward electorally unaccountable administrators deciding federal policy began in

1935, accelerated in the 1940s, and has peaked in the recent decades. Rather than

elected representatives, unelected bureaucrats increasingly make the vast majority

of the nation’s laws—a trend facilitated by the Supreme Court’s decisions in three

areas: delegation, deference, and independence.

This trend is about to be ...


Sharenting And The (Potential) Right To Be Forgotten, Keltie Haley 2020 Indiana University, Maurer School of Law

Sharenting And The (Potential) Right To Be Forgotten, Keltie Haley

Indiana Law Journal

Part I of this Note serves as an evaluation of parental use of social media and

further seeks to draw attention to the social and developmental impact parental

oversharing can have on children. Part II examines the tension between parents’

constitutional rights to direct the upbringing of their children, as well as their First

Amendment interest in online expression, and their children’s interest in personal

data security and privacy. Part III provides an overview of the European Union’s

right to be forgotten framework in the sharenting context and considers the

plausibility of implementing such a framework in the ...


The Acquisition Of Scientific Evidence Between Frye And Daubert. From Ad Hominem Arguments To Cross-Examination Among Experts, Lorenzo Zoppellari 2020 University of Trento

The Acquisition Of Scientific Evidence Between Frye And Daubert. From Ad Hominem Arguments To Cross-Examination Among Experts, Lorenzo Zoppellari

OSSA Conference Archive

The Frye and Daubert rulings give us two very different ways to intend the relation between law and science. Through the contributions of Wellman and Walton, we will see how the main method to question the expert’s testimony before a judge deferent to science is to question her personal integrity by using ad hominem arguments. Otherwise, using Alvin Goldman’s novice/expert problem, we will investigate if other manners of argumentative cross-examinations are possible.


Assisted Reproduction: Reforming State Statutes After Obergefell V. Hodges And Pavan V. Smith, Thomas B. James 2020 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Assisted Reproduction: Reforming State Statutes After Obergefell V. Hodges And Pavan V. Smith, Thomas B. James

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


Less Talk, More Action: How Law Schools Can Counteract Racial Bias Of Lsat Scores In The Admissions Process, LaTasha Hill 2020 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Less Talk, More Action: How Law Schools Can Counteract Racial Bias Of Lsat Scores In The Admissions Process, Latasha Hill

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


Impact Statements: Giving A Voice To Sexual Assault Survivors, Anamika Roy 2020 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Impact Statements: Giving A Voice To Sexual Assault Survivors, Anamika Roy

University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

No abstract provided.


Behavioral Ethics, Deception, And Legal Negotiation, Russell Korobkin 2020 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Behavioral Ethics, Deception, And Legal Negotiation, Russell Korobkin

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Cicero And Barack Obama: How To Unite The Republic Without Losing Your Head, Michael J. Cedrone 2020 Georgetown University Law Center

Cicero And Barack Obama: How To Unite The Republic Without Losing Your Head, Michael J. Cedrone

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

By turning to the works of Cicero and Barack Obama, we can find models of how to speak into crises in ways that foster unity. Cicero’s Catilinarian orations were delivered in 63 BCE, during his one-year term as consul—the highest elected official in the Roman Republic. Facing a conspiracy by certain noble Romans, Cicero delivered a series of four speeches that drove the chief conspirator out of Rome, turned public opinion against the conspirators, and convinced the Roman Senate to support the death penalty for conspirators who remained and were captured in Rome. The Fourth Catilinarian, in which ...


Covid-19 And The Conundrum Of Mask Requirements, Robert Gatter, Seema Mohapatra 2020 Saint Louis University School of Law

Covid-19 And The Conundrum Of Mask Requirements, Robert Gatter, Seema Mohapatra

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

As states begin to loosen their COVID-19 restrictions, public debate is underway about what public health measures are appropriate. Many states have some form of mask-wearing orders to prevent the spread of COVID-19 infection. Public health guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization has conflicted. From a public health point of view, it is not clear what the right answer is. In the absence of directives, individuals are also making their own choices about mask use. At a time when public health measures, like shelter-in-place orders and social distancing, are being used to ...


Augustine, Lawyers & The Lost Virtue Of Humility, Bruce P. Frohnen 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Augustine, Lawyers & The Lost Virtue Of Humility, Bruce P. Frohnen

Catholic University Law Review

The leading edge of legal scholarship and practice in recent decades has evinced a commitment to progressive politics at the expense of constitutional governance, the rule of law, and justice understood as vindication of the reasonable expectations of both the public and the parties to any given case or controversy. This article argues that renewed understanding of the virtue of humility, rooted in a genuine concern to do good according to one’s abilities, rights, and duties, is essential to the maintenance of decency in the legal profession and society as a whole. Such virtue is allowed, if not required ...


Desert In The Deluge: Using Data To Drive Racial Equity, Elizabeth J. Kennedy 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Desert In The Deluge: Using Data To Drive Racial Equity, Elizabeth J. Kennedy

Catholic University Law Review

Corporations, governments, and research institutions have learned to harness the power of data to make strategic and operational decisions that drive profitability, efficiency, and efficacy. Making meaningful use of an unprecedented and expanding volume of high velocity, complex and variable data sets—so called “big data—has also been heralded to help solve social problems like human trafficking, homelessness and climate change. Despite this data deluge, those engaged in the advancement of racial equity in workforce development operate in a data desert. Structural barriers to workplace opportunity and advancement perpetuate racialized gaps in wages and household wealth and result in ...


Zarda And Sexual Orientation Expression: A New High For Title Vii Interpretation, Nico Ramos 2020 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Zarda And Sexual Orientation Expression: A New High For Title Vii Interpretation, Nico Ramos

Catholic University Law Review

Under current federal law, a majority of jurisdictions decline to extend Title VII protections based on sexual orientation; however, a growing number of circuits have reversed precedent and held that Title VII prohibits discrimination sexual orientation discrimination. The Second Circuit’s en banc decision in Zarda v. Altitude Express reached the conclusion that sexual orientation discrimination is as a cognizable claim under Title VII because in order to discriminate against a person sexual orientation, you naturally first have to take their gender into account. The Supreme Court granted certiorari and has now heard oral arguments.

Part I of this note ...


The Female Legal Realist Inside The Common Law, Ann Bartow 2020 University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law

The Female Legal Realist Inside The Common Law, Ann Bartow

Boston College Law Review

This essay, a response piece to Anita Bernstein’s thought-provoking book The Common Law Inside the Female Body, examines the powerful tool of the common law and the role that judges play in wielding it. I begin by drawing on my twenty-four years of teaching and looking at the questions that I, and my students, grapple with every year while studying the common law: Do the uncoordinated actions of individual judges, juries, and lawyers and parties generate an efficient legal system? And does that system result in some version of justice for most of the parties, most of the time ...


Re-Reading Anita Bernstein's The Common Law Inside The Female Body From The Bottom Of The Well: Analysis Of The Central Park Five, Border Drownings, The Kavanaugh Confirmation, And The Coronavirus, Nadia B. Ahmad 2020 Barry University of Law

Re-Reading Anita Bernstein's The Common Law Inside The Female Body From The Bottom Of The Well: Analysis Of The Central Park Five, Border Drownings, The Kavanaugh Confirmation, And The Coronavirus, Nadia B. Ahmad

Boston College Law Review

This Article provides a critique of the common law based on its impact on “the legal other” or what the late Professor Derrick Bell viewed as the faces from the bottom of the well. Professor Anita Bernstein notes common law’s liberatory capacity. While this interpretation of the common law is true to a certain extent, this reading can lead to an underestimation of the common law’s limitations. In looking at the case involving the Central Park Five, I argue that feminist jurisprudence can have an unintended disparate impact on vulnerable populations. Examples of migrant detention facilities and precarious ...


Seeking Liberty, Finding Patriarchy: The Common Law's Historical Legacy, Deborah Dinner 2020 Emory University School of Law

Seeking Liberty, Finding Patriarchy: The Common Law's Historical Legacy, Deborah Dinner

Boston College Law Review

Anita Bernstein’s important new book argues that the common law might be used to advance women’s liberation. In this short essay, I analyze Bernstein’s three modes of historical analysis: redeeming the common law where it enforced oppression, recovering it when it promoted women’s rights, and facilitating its evolution toward a feminist future. I argue that Bernstein’s account, though learned and compelling, sidelines the centrality of patriarchy to the common law. Adopting the liberty of the patriarch cannot realize true freedom for women. By appropriating common law doctrines, feminists risk forging a conceptual alliance with the ...


The Common Law Inside A Social Hierarchy: Power Or Reason?, Katharine Silbaugh 2020 Boston University

The Common Law Inside A Social Hierarchy: Power Or Reason?, Katharine Silbaugh

Boston College Law Review

Anita Bernstein argues that the common law gives women, too, the right to say no to what they do not want. She demonstrates that the common law is a far-reaching defense of condoned self-regard, a system that allows individuals to place their own interests above the interests of others, particularly when seeking to exclude others. She, therefore, places in the common law a right to protection from rape and a near-absolute right to expel a pregnancy. Bernstein reasons that women’s exclusion from the common law right to say no was a mistake produced by their absence from the judiciary ...


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