Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law and Race Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,078 Full-Text Articles 2,837 Authors 2,112,814 Downloads 181 Institutions

All Articles in Law and Race

Faceted Search

4,078 full-text articles. Page 1 of 130.

White Supremacy, Police Brutality, And Family Separation: Preventing Crimes Against Humanity Within The United States, Elena Baylis 2022 University of Pittsburgh School of Law

White Supremacy, Police Brutality, And Family Separation: Preventing Crimes Against Humanity Within The United States, Elena Baylis

Articles

Although the United States tends to treat crimes against humanity as a danger that exists only in authoritarian or war-torn states, in fact, there is a real risk of crimes against humanity occurring within the United States, as illustrated by events such as systemic police brutality against Black Americans, the federal government’s family separation policy that took thousands of immigrant children from their parents at the southern border, and the dramatic escalation of White supremacist and extremist violence culminating in the January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol. In spite of this risk, the United States does ...


Foreword, Rebecca Odelson, Sharon Lui-Bettencourt 2021 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Foreword, Rebecca Odelson, Sharon Lui-Bettencourt

Hastings Race and Poverty Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Socratic Teaching And Learning Styles: Exposing The Pervasiveness Of Implicit Bias And White Privilege In Legal Pedagogy, Rory Bahadur, Liyun Zhang 2021 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Socratic Teaching And Learning Styles: Exposing The Pervasiveness Of Implicit Bias And White Privilege In Legal Pedagogy, Rory Bahadur, Liyun Zhang

Hastings Race and Poverty Law Journal

Legal educators who deny the efficacy of utilizing learning style theory inaccurately support their dismissal through misunderstanding and misrepresenting the science supporting such techniques. These erroneous conclusions are often the result of implicit bias and dysconscious racism favoring dominant white male norms and privileges. Such denial is not only disingenuous and inaccurate, but also highly detrimental to legal education, perpetuating a system that discourages and devalues the contributions and efforts of minority students.

Learning style preferences are a product of a student’s cultural background. Legal educators who recognize this and adapt their teaching methods to accommodate the modal preferences ...


California Policy Recommendations For Realizing The Promise Of Medication Abortion: How The Covid-19 Public Health Emergency Offers A Unique Lens For Catalyzing Change, Kerri Pinchuk 2021 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

California Policy Recommendations For Realizing The Promise Of Medication Abortion: How The Covid-19 Public Health Emergency Offers A Unique Lens For Catalyzing Change, Kerri Pinchuk

Hastings Race and Poverty Law Journal

While the new composition of the United States Supreme Court has raised speculation about the fate of Roe v. Wade, for millions in America the promise of a patient’s right to choose an abortion is already a distant illusion.** Decades of work by anti-abortion policymakers has resulted in prohibitive state and federal funding restrictions and widespread clinic closures. But clinicians, advocates, and researchers are optimistic about one way to expand access: medication abortion. Known colloquially as “the abortion pill,” medication abortion is poised to significantly increase access for patients everywhere, and particularly for low-income patients and those who live ...


Operating Within Systems Of Oppression, Karissa Provenza 2021 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Operating Within Systems Of Oppression, Karissa Provenza

Hastings Race and Poverty Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Masthead, 2021 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Masthead

Hastings Race and Poverty Law Journal

No abstract provided.


El Salvador: Root Causes And Just Asylum Policy Responses, Karen Musalo 2021 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

El Salvador: Root Causes And Just Asylum Policy Responses, Karen Musalo

Hastings Race and Poverty Law Journal

Throughout the course of United States history, there has often been a chasm between our ideals as a country, and our actions. Our foreign policy and immigration policy have been no exception – frequently betraying our stated commitment to democracy, respect for human rights, and protection of the persecuted. This article takes a close look at El Salvador, whose nationals make up a significant number of asylum seekers at our border. Our foreign and immigration policies towards El Salvador are illustrative of that gap between ideals and reality. We supported a brutal military during that country’s civil war, and adopted ...


Fellow Citizens, James W. Fox Jr. 2021 Stetson University College of Law

Fellow Citizens, James W. Fox Jr.

ConLawNOW

This article explores the idea of equal citizenship central to the reconstructed Constitution that originated in the crucible of African American experience and framed by the Black abolitionist movement of the antebellum North. It identifies some of the key concepts of this mid-nineteenth-century African American Constitutionalism embodied in the phrase used at the time of “Emancipate, Enfranchise, Educate.” These became the core principles of Black Reconstruction as Black leaders and their white allies sought to secure civil freedom, free labor, equal suffrage and political power, and access to education and economic and social advancement. The essay addresses primary source materials ...


Mental Health Outcomes Of Various Types Of Fear Among University Students Who Have An Undocumented Legal Status During The Donald Trump Presidency, Liliana Campos 2021 The University of San Francisco

Mental Health Outcomes Of Various Types Of Fear Among University Students Who Have An Undocumented Legal Status During The Donald Trump Presidency, Liliana Campos

Doctoral Dissertations

Having an undocumented legal status is a risk factor for mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety among university students. Much of the literature on the experiences of university students who hold an undocumented legal status has primarily focused on better understanding the educational, social, financial, and legal challenges among undergraduate students. The literature has addressed how some of these difficulties impact components of their social and mental health wellness. Yet, there is still a dearth of research focused on further understanding the experiences of students who hold an undocumented legal status from a psychological perspective, and specifically, with ...


House Bill 3: An Iou Texas Public Schools And Communities Of Color Cannot Afford, Candace L. Castillo 2021 St. Mary's University School of Law

House Bill 3: An Iou Texas Public Schools And Communities Of Color Cannot Afford, Candace L. Castillo

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming.


Modernizing Discrimination Law: The Adoption Of An Intersectional Lens, Marisa K. Sanchez 2021 St. Mary's University School of Law

Modernizing Discrimination Law: The Adoption Of An Intersectional Lens, Marisa K. Sanchez

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming.


The Termination Of Parental Rights In Texas: The Long Run Cut Short For Parents In Bexar County, Gabriel A. Narvaez 2021 St. Mary's University School of Law

The Termination Of Parental Rights In Texas: The Long Run Cut Short For Parents In Bexar County, Gabriel A. Narvaez

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming.


Foreword, Patricia E. Roberts 2021 St. Mary's University School of Law

Foreword, Patricia E. Roberts

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Foreword written by Patricia E. Roberts upon her first year as the 10th dean of St. Mary's University School of Law in San Antonio, Texas.


Undocumented Domestic Workers: A Penumbra In The Workforce, Abigail A. Roman 2021 St. Mary's University School of Law

Undocumented Domestic Workers: A Penumbra In The Workforce, Abigail A. Roman

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming.


#Blacklivesmatter—Getting From Contemporary Social Movements To Structural Change, Jamillah Bowman Williams, Naomi Mezey, Lisa O. Singh 2021 Georgetown University Law Center

#Blacklivesmatter—Getting From Contemporary Social Movements To Structural Change, Jamillah Bowman Williams, Naomi Mezey, Lisa O. Singh

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

From the haters and hackers to propaganda and privacy concerns, social media often deserves its bad reputation. But the sustained activism that followed George Floyd’s death and the ongoing movement for racial justice also demonstrated how social media can be a crucial mechanism of social change. We saw how online and on-the-ground activism can fuel each other and build momentum in ways neither can achieve in isolation. We have seen in the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement, and more specifically the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter, a new and powerful approach to using social media that goes beyond symbolic “slacktivism” and performative ...


The Racial Reckoning Of Public Interest Law, Atinuke O. Adediran, Shaun Ossei-Owusu 2021 Boston College Law School

The Racial Reckoning Of Public Interest Law, Atinuke O. Adediran, Shaun Ossei-Owusu

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This Essay contends that segments of public interest law often get a pass on questions of race because it is a field of law that is genuinely concerned with marginalized communities. But the historical record, the dearth of empirical data on race, the homogeneity of the legal profession, and the recognition that no one is necessarily immune from racial biases all demand that the public interest bar reckon with its racial character. The racial oversights of public interest law can manifest themselves in hiring, staffing, organizational mission, leadership, and the actual delivery of legal services. We argue that a racial ...


Systemic Racism In The United States, Jonathan Short 2021 James Madison University

Systemic Racism In The United States, Jonathan Short

Libraries

This bibliography contains an annotated selection of articles and studies related to systemic racism in the United States of America, covering 21st-century racial inequities in criminal justice, housing, employment, voting, education, and healthcare. Given the contentious nature of this topic - whether and to what extent systemic racism exists in the United States - sources were selected for relative neutrality, authority, and quality of methodologies used. This piece is intended to assist leaders, educators, activists, and any who wish to become better informed about this topic, develop empathy toward impacted groups, and prepare to address institutional concerns related to diversity, equity, and ...


Raising The Stakes For New Towns: State Tools To Curb Exclusionary Municipal Incorporation, Kadie Martin 2021 Boston College Law School

Raising The Stakes For New Towns: State Tools To Curb Exclusionary Municipal Incorporation, Kadie Martin

Boston College Law Review

The establishment of a new city or town affects all the communities around it. Before incorporation, an unincorporated territory typically pays taxes into its county government and receives county public services, such as participation in the county’s public schools. When an area incorporates, the new city or town effectively opts out of county services and taxes. Instead, the new municipality collects its own property taxes to fund its own public services. As a result, the surrounding county loses part of its tax base. Recently, a trend has emerged in local government law whereby majority wealthy and white unincorporated enclaves ...


Dark Matter In The Law, D. Carolina Núñez 2021 Brigham Young University

Dark Matter In The Law, D. Carolina Núñez

Boston College Law Review

Not all law is written down. Sometimes, informal norms and expectations about what the law is or ought to be constrain behavior. Lawyers and legal commentators instinctively understand this concept and have written about it, but none have discussed the interaction or relationship between these unwritten norms—which I refer to as law’s “dark matter”—and traditional formal law, like case law and statutes—which I refer to as law’s “ordinary matter.” I venture into this overlooked relationship to reveal a fascinating and important dynamic that shapes the development of law. In this Article, I explore law’s ...


Bivens In The End Zone: The Court Punts To Congress To Make The Right (Of Action) Play, Gilbert Paul Carrasco 2021 Willamette University School of Law

Bivens In The End Zone: The Court Punts To Congress To Make The Right (Of Action) Play, Gilbert Paul Carrasco

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Digital Commons powered by bepress