Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law and Psychology Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2,228 Full-Text Articles 1,911 Authors 1,761,557 Downloads 141 Institutions

All Articles in Law and Psychology

Faceted Search

2,228 full-text articles. Page 61 of 61.

Salvation Or A Lethal Dose? Attitudes And Advocacy In Right To Refuse Treatment Cases, Michael L. Perlin 2010 New York Law School

Salvation Or A Lethal Dose? Attitudes And Advocacy In Right To Refuse Treatment Cases, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

The debate surrounding the right to refuse treatment controversy continues unabated in the relevant law and social science literature. However, there are two areas where scant research attention is found. These include the attitudes of patients and staff regarding right to refuse treatment decisions and the adequacy of counsel availed to patients who assert their constitutionally protected right to refuse. This article examines both issues, mindful of what they tell us about sanism and pretextuality with respect to mental disability law and right to refuse treatment jurisprudence.


A Core Of Agreement, Donald Braman, Dan M. Kahan, David A. Hoffman 2010 George Washington University

A Core Of Agreement, Donald Braman, Dan M. Kahan, David A. Hoffman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

In this short comment, we respond to papers by Robinson, Kurzban, and Jones (RKJ) and by Darley, who replied to our paper, Punishment Naturalism. We align ourselves wholeheartedly with Darley’s argument that intuitions of criminal wrongdoing, while mediated by cognitive mechanisms that are largely universal, consist in evaluations that vary significantly across cultural groups. RKJ defend their finding of “universal” intuitions of “core” of criminal wrongdoing. They acknowledge, however, that their method for identifying the core excludes by design factors that predictably generate cultural variance in what behavior counts as murder, rape, theft and other “core” offenses. On this basis, …


Too Stubborn To Ever Be Governed By Enforced Insanity: Some Therapeutic Jurisprudence Dilemmas In The Representation Of Criminal Defendants In Incompetency And Insanity Cases, Michael L. Perlin 2010 New York Law School

Too Stubborn To Ever Be Governed By Enforced Insanity: Some Therapeutic Jurisprudence Dilemmas In The Representation Of Criminal Defendants In Incompetency And Insanity Cases, Michael L. Perlin

Articles & Chapters

Little attention has been paid to the importance between therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) and the role ofcriminal defense lawyers in insanity and incompetency-to-stand-trial (IST) cases. That inattention is especially noteworthy in light of the dismal track record of counsel providing services to defendants who are part of this cohort of incompetency-status-raisers and insanity-defense-pleaders. On one hand, this lack of attention is a surprise as TJ scholars have, in recent years, turned their attention to virtually every other aspect of the legal system. On the other hand, it is not a surprise, given the omnipresence of sanism, an irrational prejudice ofthe same …


Last Stand? The Criminal Responsibility Of War Veterans Returning From Iraq And Afghanistan With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Thomas L. Hafemeister, Nicole A. Stockey 2010 University of Virginia School of Law

Last Stand? The Criminal Responsibility Of War Veterans Returning From Iraq And Afghanistan With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Thomas L. Hafemeister, Nicole A. Stockey

Indiana Law Journal

As more psychologically scarred troops return from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, society's focus on and concern for these troops and their psychological disorders has increased With this increase and with associated studies confirming the validity of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) diagnosis and the genuine impact of PTSD on the behavior of war veterans, greater weight may be given to the premise that PTSD is a mental disorder that provides grounds for a "mental status defense, " such as insanity, a lack of mens rea, or self-defense. Although considerable impediments remain, given the current political climate, Iraq and Afghanistan …


Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, And The Criminal Justice System, Deborah W. Denno 2010 Fordham University School of Law

Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, And The Criminal Justice System, Deborah W. Denno

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Welfare As Happiness, John Bronsteen, Christopher Buccafusco, Jonathan S. Masur 2010 Duke Law School

Welfare As Happiness, John Bronsteen, Christopher Buccafusco, Jonathan S. Masur

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


(Mis)Judging Intent: The Fundamental Attribution Error In Federal Securities Law, Victor D. Quintanilla 2010 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

(Mis)Judging Intent: The Fundamental Attribution Error In Federal Securities Law, Victor D. Quintanilla

Articles by Maurer Faculty

This article examines the element of scienter (fraudulent intent) in claims of federal securities fraud under Section 10(b) of the Exchange Act and, more specifically, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Tellabs, Inc. v. Makor Issues & Rights, Ltd., 551 U.S. 308 (2007) from a social psychological perspective. The field of social psychology has documented a pervasive phenomena, the Fundamental Attribution Error, the failure of decision makers to consider situational explanations, including the force of environments and social and situational norms on human conduct. In light of robust social psychological research on the Fundamental Attribution Error, legal concepts such as …


Introduction: Challenging The School-To-Prison Pipeline, Deborah N. Archer 2010 New York Law School

Introduction: Challenging The School-To-Prison Pipeline, Deborah N. Archer

NYLS Law Review

No abstract provided.


Situations, Frames, And Stereotypes: Cognitive Barriers On The Road To Nondiscrimination, Marybeth Herald 2010 Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Situations, Frames, And Stereotypes: Cognitive Barriers On The Road To Nondiscrimination, Marybeth Herald

Michigan Journal of Gender & Law

A study of the psychological literature can enhance legal theory by focusing attention on how the human brain perceives, distinguishes, categorizes, and ultimately makes decisions. The more that we learn about the brain's intricate operations, the more effective we can be at combating the types of gender biased decisions that influence our lives. In developing strategies to achieve equality, feminist, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and intersex activists would be wise to learn from the psychological literature. This Article highlights a few examples illustrating how this knowledge might re-direct strategic choices for combating gender inequality.


Scientific Understandings Of Postpartum Illness: Improving Health Law And Policy?, Stacey A. Tovino 2010 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Scientific Understandings Of Postpartum Illness: Improving Health Law And Policy?, Stacey A. Tovino

Scholarly Works

In its broadest sense, the Article examines the relationship between science and the law in the context of postpartum illness. From classical antiquity to the present day, physicians and scientists have investigated the causes, correlates, and consequences of the depressions and psychoses that develop in some women following their transition to motherhood. The scientific investigation of postpartum illness has been characterized by an open-ended search for knowledge with the recgonition that scientific findings published one day are subject to revision the next. Legislators and judges also have sought to understand postpartum illness as necessary to make laws that affect and …


Breach Is For Suckers, Tess Wilkinson-Ryan, David A. Hoffman 2010 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Breach Is For Suckers, Tess Wilkinson-Ryan, David A. Hoffman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

This paper presents results from three experiments offering evidence that parties see breach of contract as a form of exploitation, making disappointed promisees into “suckers.” In psychology, being a sucker turns on a three-part definition: betrayal, inequity, and intention. We used web-based questionnaires to test the effect of each of the three factors separately. Our results support the hypothesis that when breach of contract cues an exploitation schema, people become angry, offended, and inclined to retaliate even when retaliation is costly. This theory offers a useful advance insofar it explains why victims of breach demand more than similarly situated tort …


Incompetence To Maintain A Divorce Action: When Breaking Up Is Odd To Do, Douglas Mossman MD, Amanda N. Shoemaker 2010 University of Cincinnati College of Law

Incompetence To Maintain A Divorce Action: When Breaking Up Is Odd To Do, Douglas Mossman Md, Amanda N. Shoemaker

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

The law has well-established provisions for handling divorce actions initiated on behalf of persons already adjudged incompetent or by competent petitioners against incompetent spouses. But how should a court respond if a mentally ill petitioner who is competent to manage most personal affairs seeks to divorce a spouse for bizarre, very odd, or crazy-sounding reasons?

Several recent social developments - better psychiatric treatment, wider acceptance of divorce, population trends, and the advent of “no-fault” and unilateral divorce laws - have made it more likely that mentally ill petitioners will seek divorces. Yet the question of whether to allow a divorce …


Mental Disorders And The "System Of Judgmental Responsibility", Anita L. Allen 2010 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Mental Disorders And The "System Of Judgmental Responsibility", Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

No abstract provided.


Situation, Frames, And Stereotypes: Cognitive Barriers On The Road To Nondiscrimination, Marybeth Herald 2009 Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Situation, Frames, And Stereotypes: Cognitive Barriers On The Road To Nondiscrimination, Marybeth Herald

Marybeth Herald

The psychological literature enhances our understanding of discrimination. This essay discusses three examples of how that literature can contribute to limiting destructive gender bias in the workplace, in private interactions, and in the courtroom. First, situational pressures have a powerful influence on our actions and must be taken into account in combating employment discrimination. A workplace designed for traditional male needs (limited parenting and home responsibilities) will continue to pressure females out of the workplace or childbearing despite formal equality rules. Second, the use of the term “disorder” as a frame for describing persons with an intersex condition may not …


The Persistence Of Low Expectations In Special Education Law Viewed Through The Lens Of Therapeutic Jurisprduence, Richard Peterson 2009 Pepperdine University

The Persistence Of Low Expectations In Special Education Law Viewed Through The Lens Of Therapeutic Jurisprduence, Richard Peterson

Richard Peterson

For more than thirty-five years a paradigm of low expectations has infected efforts to educate children with disabilities and has been a persistent and stubborn obstacle to the successful implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and its predecessor, the Education of All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA). This dilemma raises questions addressed in this paper: What is meant by low expectations in the context of Special Education Law? What are the root causes of this phenomenon, and what makes it so resistant to change? How does it impede implementation of the IDEA? And lastly, in what ways does …


The 'Next Friends' Suit: Mary Baker Eddy And The Church Of Christ Scientist, On Trial, Lorin Geitner 2009 Chapman University

The 'Next Friends' Suit: Mary Baker Eddy And The Church Of Christ Scientist, On Trial, Lorin Geitner

Lorin C. Geitner

An examination of the competency trial of Mary Baker Eddy, and its subsequent effects and consequences.


Gay And Lesbian Elders: History, Law, And Identity Politics In The United States, Nancy J. Knauer 2009 Temple University School of Law

Gay And Lesbian Elders: History, Law, And Identity Politics In The United States, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

The approximately two million gay and lesbian elders in the United States are an underserved and understudied population. At a time when gay men and lesbians enjoy an unprecedented degree of social acceptance and legal protection, many elders face the daily challenges of aging isolated from family, detached from the larger gay and lesbian community, and ignored by mainstream aging initiatives. Drawing on materials from law, history, and social theory, this book integrates practical proposals for reform with larger issues of sexuality and identity. Beginning with a summary of existing demographic data and offering a historical overview of pre-Stonewall views …


Judicial Decision Making About Forensic Mental Health Evidence, Richard E. Redding, Daniel C. Murrie 2009 Chapman University School of Law

Judicial Decision Making About Forensic Mental Health Evidence, Richard E. Redding, Daniel C. Murrie

Richard E. Redding

Judges play a central role in decision making in the justice system. This chapter reviews the extant empirical research on judicial decision making in criminal, juvenile, and civil cases. We discuss judges’ decision making about forensic mental health evidence introduced in these cases, judicial receptivity to various kinds of evidence, and their understanding of clinical and scientific evidence as well as the ways they make rulings about such evidence. We focus on decision making at the trial court level, in those arenas that are most relevant to the forensic mental health practitioner (psychiatrist, psychologist, or social worker) who is called …


Judicial Decision Making About Forensic Mental Health Evidence, Richard E. Redding, Daniel C. Murrie 2009 Chapman University School of Law

Judicial Decision Making About Forensic Mental Health Evidence, Richard E. Redding, Daniel C. Murrie

Richard E. Redding

Judges play a central role in decision making in the justice system. This chapter reviews the extant empirical research on judicial decision making in criminal, juvenile, and civil cases. We discuss judges’ decision making about forensic mental health evidence introduced in these cases, judicial receptivity to various kinds of evidence, and their understanding of clinical and scientific evidence as well as the ways they make rulings about such evidence. We focus on decision making at the trial court level, in those arenas that are most relevant to the forensic mental health practitioner (psychiatrist, psychologist, or social worker) who is called …


Digital Commons powered by bepress