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Sex Education And Rape, Michelle J. Anderson 2010 CUNY School of Law

Sex Education And Rape, Michelle J. Anderson

Michigan Journal of Gender and Law

In the law of rape, consent has been and remains a gendered concept. Consent presumes female acquiescence to male sexual initiation. It presumes a man desires to penetrate a woman sexually. It presumes the woman willingly yields to the man's desires. It does not presume, and of course does not require, female sexual desire. Consent is what the law calls it when he advances and she does not put up a fight. I have argued elsewhere that the kind of thin consent that the law focuses on is not enough ethically and it should not be enough legally to ...


Rethinking Consent In A Big Love Way, Cheryl Hanna 2010 Vermont Law School

Rethinking Consent In A Big Love Way, Cheryl Hanna

Michigan Journal of Gender and Law

This Article is based on a presentation at the Michigan Journal of Gender and Law as part of their symposium "Rhetoric & Relevance: An Investigation into the Present & Future of Feminist Legal Theory." In it, I explore the problem of categorical exclusions to the consent doctrine in private intimate relationships through the lens of the HBO series Big Love, which is about modern polygamy. There remains the normative question both after Lawrence v. Texas and in feminist legal theory of under what circumstances individuals should be able to consent to activity that takes place within the context of a private, intimate relationship. The tensions between individual autonomy and state interests are beautifully explored in Big Love. Drawing on themes presented in the series, this Article asks if there is any principled way to make the distinction between those relationships in which there is some physical or psychological harm inflicted and those in which the state has proscribed a relationship because of some moral or social harm it allegedly causes. Four case studies are presented to prompt readers to try to answer the question of when consent should be a defense to otherwise proscribed activity. I conclude that the future of feminist legal theory depends on its ability to remain ambivalent about the tensions presented in the consent doctrine as applied to contexts such as polygamy, prostitution, sadomasochistic sex, obscenity, and domestic violence. Big Love seeks to persuade us to accept ambivalence and to be open to changing our minds because of the complicated nature of women's (and men's) lives; feminist legal theory ought to persuade us to do the same.


Past As Prologue: Old And New Feminisms, Martha Chamallas 2010 Moritz College of Law, Ohio State University

Past As Prologue: Old And New Feminisms, Martha Chamallas

Michigan Journal of Gender and Law

Each "stage" of feminist legal theory-and each brand or strand of feminism- stays alive and is never completely replaced by newer approaches. When I first attempted to synthesize the field of Feminist Legal Theory for a treatise I was writing at the end of the twentieth century, I thought it would be useful to think chronologically and to analyze the major developments of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. I crudely divided feminist legal theory into three stages roughly corresponding to the preceding decades: the equality stage of the 1970s, the difference stage of the 1980s, and the diversity stage of ...


Social Justice Feminism, Kristin (Brandser) Kalsem, Verna L. Williams 2010 University of Cincinnati College of Law

Social Justice Feminism, Kristin (Brandser) Kalsem, Verna L. Williams

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

For the past three years, women leaders from national groups, grassroots organizations, academia and beyond have gathered to address dissonance in the women's movement, particularly dissatisfaction with the movement's emphasis on women privileged on account of their race, class, or sexuality. At these meetings of the New Women's Movement Initiative (NWMI), advocates who no longer want to do feminism have articulated a desire for social justice feminism. This article analyzes what such a shift might mean for feminist practice and legal theory.

Drawing on history, specifically the work of the women behind the Brandeis brief in the ...


Alma Mater: Clara Floltz And Hastings College Of Law, Barbara Babcock 2010 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Alma Mater: Clara Floltz And Hastings College Of Law, Barbara Babcock

Hastings Women’s Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Women In Antebellum Alachua County, Florida, Herbert Joseph O'Shields 2010 University of North Florida

Women In Antebellum Alachua County, Florida, Herbert Joseph O'Shields

UNF Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of this study was to investigate the role and status of women in Alachua County, Florida, from 1821 through 1860. The secondary literature suggests that women throughout America had virtually no public role to play in antebellum society except in limited circumstances in some mature urban, commercial settings. The study reviewed U.S. Census materials, slave ownership records, and land ownership records as a means to examine the family structures, the mobility and persistence of persons and households, and the economic status of women, particularly including woman headed households. The study also examined laws adopted by the Florida ...


Forced Marriage As A Harm In Domestic And International Law, Catherine Dauvergne, Jenni Millbank 2010 Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia

Forced Marriage As A Harm In Domestic And International Law, Catherine Dauvergne, Jenni Millbank

Faculty Publications

This article reports on our analysis of 120 refugee cases from Australia, Canada, and Britain where an actual or threatened forced marriage was part of the claim for protection. We found that forced marriage was rarely considered by refugee decision makers to be a harm in and of itself. This finding contributes to understanding how gender and sexuality are analysed within refugee law, because the harm of forced marriage is experienced differently by lesbians, gay men and heterosexual women. We contrast our findings in the refugee case law with domestic initiatives in Europe aimed at protecting nationals from forced marriages ...


Pregnant Man?: A Conversation, Darren Rosenblum, Noa Ben-Asher, Mary Anne Case, Elizabeth F. Emens 2010 Columbia Law School

Pregnant Man?: A Conversation, Darren Rosenblum, Noa Ben-Asher, Mary Anne Case, Elizabeth F. Emens

Faculty Scholarship

This Essay includes a first-person narrative of having a child through surrogacy, responses to that narrative by other law professors and the surrogate, and a concluding response and epilogue by the Author.


A Little More Mascara: Response To Making Up Is Hard To Do, Darren Rosenblum 2010 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

A Little More Mascara: Response To Making Up Is Hard To Do, Darren Rosenblum

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Response to the exploration of the dynamics of race, gender, and sexual orientation in the law school classroom by Professors Adrienne Davis and Robert Chang.


Sex Representation On The Bench: Legitimacy And International Criminal Courts, Nienke Grossman 2010 University of Baltimore School of Law

Sex Representation On The Bench: Legitimacy And International Criminal Courts, Nienke Grossman

All Faculty Scholarship

This essay examines the relationship between legitimacy and the presence of both male and female judges on international criminal court benches. It argues that sex representation – an approximate reflection of the ratio of the sexes in the general population – on the bench is an important contributor to legitimacy of international criminal courts. First, it proposes that sex representation affects normative legitimacy because men and women bring different perspectives to judging. Consequently, without both sexes, adjudication is inherently biased. Second, even if one rejects the proposition that men and women "think differently", sex representation affects sociological legitimacy because sex representation signals ...


Balancing Liberty, Dignity And Safety: The Impact Of Domestic Violence Lethality Screening, Margaret E. Johnson 2010 University of Baltimore School of Law

Balancing Liberty, Dignity And Safety: The Impact Of Domestic Violence Lethality Screening, Margaret E. Johnson

All Faculty Scholarship

This Article undertakes the first ever analysis of the consequences of the justice and legal system’s extensive use of lethality assessment tools for women subjected to abuse. An increasing number of states are now requiring their police, prosecutors, civil attorneys, advocates, service providers, and court personnel to assess women in order to obtain a score that indicates the woman’s lethality risk because of domestic violence. The mandated danger assessment screen of all women subjected to violence focuses only on the risk of homicide and thereby limits the definition of what is domestic violence. In addition, the accompanying protocol ...


Eve Sedgwick, Civil Rights, And Perversion, Katherine M. Franke 2010 Columbia Law School

Eve Sedgwick, Civil Rights, And Perversion, Katherine M. Franke

Faculty Scholarship

It is hard to imagine where queer theory would be without Eve Sedgwick. Indeed, I can't imagine where my own thinking would be had it not been informed, enriched, challenged, repulsed, and seduced by Sedgwick's writing. Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire and The Epistemology of the Closet, the early work, gave me the tools to think about the fundamental landscapes of my intellectual world in ways that decoupled and reconfigured the binaries of male/ female, heterosexual/homosexual, friend/lover, and public/private. Sedgwick gave us the idea of homosociality and a critique of identity and ...


The Third Wave's Break From Feminism, Bridget J. Crawford 2010 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

The Third Wave's Break From Feminism, Bridget J. Crawford

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Janet Halley proves that third-wave feminism is wrong - wrongly described, that is. Young feminists in the United States tout a "third wave" of feminism that is hip, ironic and playful - the supposed opposite of the dour and strident "second wave" of 1970's feminism. Goodbye frumpy sandals; hello sexy fishnets, according to third-wave feminism. Initially young women themselves (and now writers and scholars) embraced a pervasive wave metaphor to convey the belief that differences within feminism are generational. Youth crashes against (and ultimately overtakes) its elders. But rifts within feminism cannot be so neatly explained. The story is more complicated ...


Rethinking International Women's Human Rights Through Eve Sedgwick, Darren Rosenblum 2010 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Rethinking International Women's Human Rights Through Eve Sedgwick, Darren Rosenblum

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Since the death of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, I have wanted to honor her memory, and this panel is the perfect venue. Sedgwick's foundational understandings of sexuality, gender, and identity set the stage for much of my work and that of those I admire. My own work looks at how the state regulates gender in the “public” sphere. I attempt to challenge the tensions and intersections among international and comparative notions of equality and identity. Group identity constructions vary across cultural lines and conflict with liberal notions of universalist constitutionalism and equality. My current work, Unsex CEDAW: What's Wrong ...


Crimes Without Punishment: Violence Against Women In Guatemala, Karen Musalo, Elisabeth Pellegrin, S. Shawn Roberts 2010 UC Hastings College of the Law

Crimes Without Punishment: Violence Against Women In Guatemala, Karen Musalo, Elisabeth Pellegrin, S. Shawn Roberts

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Taxation, Pregnancy, And Privacy, Bridget J. Crawford 2010 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Taxation, Pregnancy, And Privacy, Bridget J. Crawford

Pace Law Faculty Publications

This Article frames a discussion of surrogacy within the context of existing income tax laws. A surrogate receives money for carrying and bearing a child. This payment is income by any definition, even if the surrogacy contract recites that it is a "reimbursement." Cases and rulings on the income tax consequences of the sale of blood and human breast milk, as well as analogies to situations in which people are paid to wear advertising on their bodies, support the conclusion that a surrogate recognizes taxable income, although the Internal Revenue Service has never stated so. For tax purposes, the reproductive ...


The Currency Of White Women's Hair In A Down Economy, Bridget J. Crawford 2010 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

The Currency Of White Women's Hair In A Down Economy, Bridget J. Crawford

Pace Law Faculty Publications

This short essay is a reflection on the relationship between the economy and women’s hair. I suggest that examining women’s spending on hair care products during uncertain financial conditions provides insight into the gendered aspects of the economy. As the economy has declined, sales of home hair-care products targeted toward white women have increased. Major news outlets report on salon customers trying to stretch out the time between their regular $250 hair salon treatments. Certain women turn to home hair dyes to maintain conforming appearances. In popular culture, to have white skin and gray hair is to be ...


Introduction To The Symposium Issue Sexuality And Gender Law: The Difference A Field Makes, Nan D. Hunter 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Introduction To The Symposium Issue Sexuality And Gender Law: The Difference A Field Makes, Nan D. Hunter

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

For a very long time, issues of sexuality and gender remained outside the boundaries of what was considered important legal scholarship. Indeed, the very presence in the legal academy of the concepts of sexuality and gender was viewed as barely legitimate, certainly not respectable, and, in intellectual terms, at best facetious-or, to let Justice White rest in peace, at best frivolous.

One result of this now dying worldview was a series of categorical exclusions and erasures-exemplified by the exclusion of sexual speech from the First Amendment, the exclusion of nonreproductive kinship networks from the definition of family, the exclusion of ...


The Perils Of Empowerment, Jane H. Aiken, Katherine Goldwasser 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

The Perils Of Empowerment, Jane H. Aiken, Katherine Goldwasser

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This Article examines bystander norms of disinterest and blame that inform and undermine strategies for dealing with significant social problems such as domestic violence. Current strategies rely on individual “empowerment” to reduce such violence. These strategies reflect fundamental misconceptions and false assumptions about the nature of domestic violence, about why this sort of violence persists so stubbornly, and, ultimately, about what it takes to change behavior that has long been tolerated, if not actually fostered, as a result of deeply imbedded social and cultural norms. The net effect is that far from empowering abused women, let alone reaching the norms ...


How Should Colleges And Universities Respond To Peer Sexual Violence On Campus? What The Current Legal Environment Tells Us, Nancy Chi Cantalupo 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

How Should Colleges And Universities Respond To Peer Sexual Violence On Campus? What The Current Legal Environment Tells Us, Nancy Chi Cantalupo

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Over the last decade or so, various legal schemes such as the statutes and court or agency enforcement of Title IX and the Clery Act have increasingly recognized that certain institutional responses perpetuate a cycle of nonreporting and violence. This paper draws upon comprehensive legal research conducted on how the law now regulates school responses to campus peer sexual violence to show that schools face much greater liability from failing to protect the rights of campus peer sexual violence survivors than of any other group of students, including alleged assailants. By encouraging their institutions to develop more victim-centered responses to ...


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