Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Land Use Planning Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

1,523 Full-Text Articles 1,129 Authors 429,145 Downloads 83 Institutions

All Articles in Land Use Planning

Faceted Search

1,523 full-text articles. Page 1 of 25.

Land Tenure Security In Colombia: For Whom? What For? The Relativity Of The Property Rights Regime In The Context Of Transitional Justice And Economic Globalization, Marco A. Velásquez-Ruiz 2015 Osgoode Hall Law School - York University

Land Tenure Security In Colombia: For Whom? What For? The Relativity Of The Property Rights Regime In The Context Of Transitional Justice And Economic Globalization, Marco A. Velásquez-Ruiz

Marco A. Velásquez-Ruiz

This paper intends to illustrate current challenges around the conceptualization and articulation of land tenure security in Colombia. This situation is explained by the existence of tensions between divergent normative rationales within the country’s policy agenda. On the one hand, the implementation of a transitional justice project intended to achieve sustainable peace in the country through the compensation of victims and execution of structural adjustments in the rural side. And on the other, the systematic conclusion of international investment agreements so as to attract foreign investment by means of the provision of a stable legal environment. It is contended ...


Smart Growth-Oriented Density And Parking Regulations, Michael Lewyn 2015 Touro Law Center

Smart Growth-Oriented Density And Parking Regulations, Michael Lewyn

Michael E Lewyn

Many articles have been written about pro-sprawl land use regulation, such as minimum parking requirements. This speech, by contrast, focuses on the frequency of land use regulation designed to increase walkability- in particular, minimum density requirements and maximum parking requirements. I conclude that the first type of regulation is quite rare and usually very lenient. The second type of regulation is more frequent; however, the impact of maximum parking requirements is not yet clear.


Protecting Marine Biodiversity In Latin America Through Area-Based Fisheries Regulation, Xiao Recio-Blanco 2015 Duke University

Protecting Marine Biodiversity In Latin America Through Area-Based Fisheries Regulation, Xiao Recio-Blanco

Xiao Recio-Blanco

Governments all around the world have addressed the challenge of marine resources management enacting laws and enforcing public policies. To date, most of these initiatives have failed. In Latin America, sophisticated environmental protection statutes are already in place. Unfortunately, these statutes are largely overlooked by sea users and government officials. Lack of compliance has become the most significant hurdle to the sustainable use of Latin America’s marine resources.

Recently, governments and Non-Governmental Organizations in Latin America have showed increased interest in Marine Spatial Planning (MSP). MSP is a process that analyzes the spatial distribution of human activities at sea ...


Shared Sovereignty: The Role Of Expert Agencies In Environmental Law, Michael Blumm, Andrea Lang 2015 Lewis & Clark Law School

Shared Sovereignty: The Role Of Expert Agencies In Environmental Law, Michael Blumm, Andrea Lang

Michael Blumm

Environmental law usually features statutory interpretation or administrative interpretation by a single agency. Less frequent is a close look at the mechanics of implementing environmental policy across agency lines. In this article, we offer such a look: a comparative analysis of five statutes and their approaches to sharing decision-making authority among more than one federal agency. We call this pluralistic approach to administrative decisionmaking “shared sovereignty.”

In this analysis, we compare implementation of the National Environmental Policy, the National Historic Preservation Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Federal Power Act. All of these statutes incorporate ...


Agenda: Seeds Of Change: Responding To Global Change In A Bottom-Up World, University of Colorado Boulder. Getches Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment, Posner Center for International Development, RESOLVE (Firm), Newmont Mining Corporation 2015 University of Colorado Law School

Agenda: Seeds Of Change: Responding To Global Change In A Bottom-Up World, University Of Colorado Boulder. Getches Wilkinson Center For Natural Resources, Energy, And The Environment, Posner Center For International Development, Resolve (Firm), Newmont Mining Corporation

Seeds of Change: Responding to Global Change in a Bottom-Up World (Martz Winter Symposium, February 12-13)

Sponsors: Posner Center for International Development, RESOLVE, Inc., Newmont Mining Corporation, and Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment.

Conference moderators, panelists and speakers included University of Colorado Law School professors Phil Weiser, Sarah Krakoff, Britt Banks, and Lakshman Guruswamy.

This conference is made possible through the generous support of donors who sponsored this year’s Martz Sustainability Symposium (including Newmont Mining Corporation) and those who have invested in our Clyde O. Martz Endowed Fund for Natural Resources Management (including Brian Dolan and Davis Graham and Stubbs LLP). The Martz Natural Resources Management Fund was established in the ...


Preventing Perpetuity: Ensuring Clean Mine Closure Without Water Treatment Into Infinity, Nicholas Clabbers 2015 University of Colorado Boulder

Preventing Perpetuity: Ensuring Clean Mine Closure Without Water Treatment Into Infinity, Nicholas Clabbers

Nicholas Clabbers

Mine closure is a pressing environmental problem. Done improperly, mine closure can leave behind

an ugly legacy of water and soil pollution from heavy metals and mining byproducts. Many scientific

studies that attempt to quantify and explain the impacts of mine closure, both the formal legal and

policy analysis, are sparse, especially with regards to proposed solutions. This article fills that gap – it

provides an overview of the legal barriers to clean mine closure, a survey of existing law, and a

thorough analysis of a possible framework for improved mine remediation. It advances practical

solutions and works through the steps ...


Land Use Exactions, Anti-Evasion, And Koontz V. St. Johns River Water Management District, Michael B. Kent Jr. 2015 Campbell University

Land Use Exactions, Anti-Evasion, And Koontz V. St. Johns River Water Management District, Michael B. Kent Jr.

Michael B. Kent Jr.

This article considers the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District, which extended the application of the Court’s exactions test (known as Nollan/Dollan). The majority of the Court relied heavily on the unconstitutional conditions doctrine, explaining that this doctrine formed the basis not only for the Nollan/Dolan framework but also for the extension of that framework to Koontz’s new factual setting. Led by Justice Kagan, four members of the Court dissented. Although the dissenting Justices seemingly agreed with several of the majority’s propositions, they vigorously opposed ...


How Local Is Local?: A Response To Professor David B. Spence's The Political Economy Of Local Vetoes, Joshua P. Fershee 2015 West Virginia University

How Local Is Local?: A Response To Professor David B. Spence's The Political Economy Of Local Vetoes, Joshua P. Fershee

Joshua P Fershee

Professor Fershee responds to Professor David B. Spence’s article about local hydraulic fracturing bans: The Political Economy of Local Vetoes, 93 Texas L. Rev. 351 (2015). Professor Spence notes that the shale oil and gas debate provides an example of “an age-old political problem that the law is called upon to solve: the conflict between an intensely held minority viewpoint and a less intense, contrary view held by the majority.” In resolving such conflicts, Spence suggests that courts should resolve such “conflicts in ways that encourage states and local governments to regulate in ways that weigh both the costs ...


A Taxing Endeavor: Local Government Protection Of Our Nation's Coasts In The "Wake" Of Climate Change, Simone Savino 2015 Florida State University College of Law

A Taxing Endeavor: Local Government Protection Of Our Nation's Coasts In The "Wake" Of Climate Change, Simone Savino

Simone Savino

A storm is brewing, and not just in our nation’s coastal waters. The effects of climate change are becoming alarmingly apparent: sea levels are rising, storm surges are intensifying and ocean temperatures are warming at increasing speeds. Higher storm surges have led to increased flooding in coastal zones and nearby low-lying regions. The need for greater disaster preparedness in areas vulnerable to storm surges is evident, not just in the United States, but worldwide. As a direct result, coastal towns and cities have been left with the daunting task, and cost, of implementing littoral adaptation measures such as beach ...


Deployment Of Geoengineering By The Private And Public Sector: Can The Risks Of Geoengineering Ever Be Effectively Regulated?, Daniela E. Lai 2015 SelectedWorks

Deployment Of Geoengineering By The Private And Public Sector: Can The Risks Of Geoengineering Ever Be Effectively Regulated?, Daniela E. Lai

Daniela E Lai

Geoengineering has been described as any large-scale environmental manipulation designed with the purpose of mitigating the effects of climate change without decreasing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). Currently there are no specific rules regulating geoengineering activities particularly if geoengineering is deployed in areas beyond national jurisdiction. This article argues that, in order to mitigate the risks of geoengineering, there needs to be effective regulation of its deployment both in international and domestic law. The risks of geoengineering can only be effectively regulated if there is international cooperation between all levels of governments and private individuals involved in the research and development ...


The (Somewhat) False Hope Of Comprehensive Planning, Michael Lewyn 2015 Touro Law Center

The (Somewhat) False Hope Of Comprehensive Planning, Michael Lewyn

Michael E Lewyn

Many commentators treat municipal comprehensive planning as necessary (or at least sufficient) for smart growth. This essay argues that comprehensive plans, although desirable, are neither necessary nor sufficient for "smarter" (that is, more nondriver-friendly) development.


The Property Rights Revolution That Failed: Eminent Domain In The 2004 Supreme Court Term, David Schultz 2014 Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

The Property Rights Revolution That Failed: Eminent Domain In The 2004 Supreme Court Term, David Schultz

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Takings Cases In The October 2004 Term, Leon D. Lazer 2014 Touro Law School

Takings Cases In The October 2004 Term, Leon D. Lazer

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Federalism Cases In The October 2004 Term, Erwin Chemerinsky 2014 Touro Law School

Federalism Cases In The October 2004 Term, Erwin Chemerinsky

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Section 1983 Cases In The October 2004 Term, Martin A. Schwartz 2014 Touro Law School

Section 1983 Cases In The October 2004 Term, Martin A. Schwartz

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


An Unfinished Joruney: Arctic Indigenous Rights, Lands, And Jurisdiction?, Tony Penikett 2014 Seattle University School of Law

An Unfinished Joruney: Arctic Indigenous Rights, Lands, And Jurisdiction?, Tony Penikett

Seattle University Law Review

The indigenous rights movement has been defined as a struggle for land and jurisdiction. Over the last forty years, American and Canadian governments made much progress on the land question in the Arctic and sub-Arctic; however, from an irrational fear of the unknown, politicians in Washington, D.C. and Ottawa have effectively blocked the pathways to aboriginal jurisdiction or self-government. During the late-twentieth century in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, as well as in Nisga’a territory, indigenous governments negotiated local government powers, but continent-wide progress on the question of indigenous jurisdiction has stalled. This Article considers the formation ...


Extracting More Than Resources: Human Security And Arctic Indigenous Women, Victoria Sweet 2014 Seattle University School of Law

Extracting More Than Resources: Human Security And Arctic Indigenous Women, Victoria Sweet

Seattle University Law Review

The circumpolar Arctic region is at the forefront of rapid change, and with change come potential threats to human security. Numerous factors determine what makes a state, a community, or an individual feel secure. For example, extractive industry development can bring economic benefits to an area, but these development projects also bring security concerns, including potential human rights violations. While security concerns connected with development projects have been studied in southern hemisphere countries and countries classified as “developing,” concerns connected with extractive industry development projects in “developed” countries like the United States have received little attention. This Article will change ...


Conceptualizing Climate Justice In Kivalina, Marissa Knodel 2014 Seattle University School of Law

Conceptualizing Climate Justice In Kivalina, Marissa Knodel

Seattle University Law Review

Due to climate change, indigenous communities in Alaska are forced to develop in ways that adversely affect their livelihoods and culture. For example, decreases in sea ice, increases in the frequency of sea storms, and melting permafrost have so accelerated the erosion of one barrier island that an entire village faces relocation. These indigenous communities, which have contributed little to causing climate change, are limited in their ability to adapt. After examining three broad questions about the effects of climate change on indigenous communities, this Article reaches four preliminary conclusion about relocation as a climate adaptation strategy and its relations ...


Fisheries Governance And How It Fits Within The Broader Arctic Governance, Adam Soliman 2014 Seattle University School of Law

Fisheries Governance And How It Fits Within The Broader Arctic Governance, Adam Soliman

Seattle University Law Review

Climate change is causing the Arctic ice to melt and fish stocks to change their migration patterns. These changes are increasing access to Arctic fisheries, as well as moving other fish stocks to the north. To prevent the depletion of fish stocks and to protect the Arctic environment, proper fisheries governance requires collaboration between nation-states and specific populations. Fisheries present unique governance and management issues. Unlike other natural resources, fish stocks do not stay in the same place. The non-stationary nature of fish stocks, along with shared sovereignty over the oceans, make coordination between stakeholders the most difficult as well ...


Changes In Latitudes Call For Changes In Attitudes: Towards Recognition Of A Global Imperative For Stewardship, Not Exploitation, In The Arctic, Taylor Simpson-Wood 2014 Seattle University School of Law

Changes In Latitudes Call For Changes In Attitudes: Towards Recognition Of A Global Imperative For Stewardship, Not Exploitation, In The Arctic, Taylor Simpson-Wood

Seattle University Law Review

For more than two centuries, the imagination of mariners has been captured by visions of a trade route across the Arctic Sea allowing vessels to travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. Known as the Northwest Passage, this fabled route is a time- and money-saving sea lane running from the Atlantic Ocean Arctic Circle to the Pacific Ocean Arctic Circle. Now, the thinning of the ice in the Arctic may transform what was once only a dream into a reality. New shipping lanes linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans are likely to open between 2040 and 2059. If loss ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress