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The Administrative Procedure Act And How The “Final Rule” Designation Allows Agencies To Perpetuate Harm By Failing To Act, Julia Eaton 2018 Boston College Law School

The Administrative Procedure Act And How The “Final Rule” Designation Allows Agencies To Perpetuate Harm By Failing To Act, Julia Eaton

Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review

In order to preserve the historic authenticity of Alexander Hamilton’s only home, concerned citizens, community groups, and the National Park Service (NPS) created a plan to move Hamilton’s Home. The Friends of Hamilton Grange (“Friends”) were created to assist the NPS in that process. The Friends never filed official paperwork to become an official “friends group” of the NPS. After years of planning, the NPS approved plans for Hamilton’s home that conflicted with the interests of the Friends. The Friends claimed that the NPS did not properly consult with them throughout the planning process and the undeveloped ...


Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney 2018 Texas A&M University School of Law

Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney

Boston College Law Review

The non-enforcement of existing property laws is not logically separable from the issue of unfair and unjust state deprivations of property rights at which the Constitution’s Takings Clause takes aim. This Article suggests, therefore, that takings law should police allocations resulting from non-enforcement decisions on the same “fairness and justice” grounds that it polices allocations resulting from decisions to enact and enforce new regulations. Rejecting the extant majority position that state decisions not to enforce existing property laws are categorically immune from takings liability is not to advocate that persons impacted by such decisions should be automatically or even ...


Wyoming V. Zinke, Jaclyn Van Natta 2018 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Wyoming V. Zinke, Jaclyn Van Natta

Public Land and Resources Law Review

In Wyoming v. Zinke, the Bureau of Land Management attempted to update a regulation governing hydraulic fracturing from the 1980s, but oil and gas industry companies opposed, and brought suit. The district court held in favor of the industry petitioners, and the Bureau of Land Management and citizen group intervenors appealed. In the wake of appeal, Donald J. Trump became President of the United States. The administration change caused the Bureau of Land Management to alter its position and align with the new administration. Secretary of the Interior, Ryan Zinke, via executive order, began rescinding the new fracking regulation, which ...


Hb 434 - Eminent Domain, Ashley M. Bowcott, Derek M. Schwahn 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 434 - Eminent Domain, Ashley M. Bowcott, Derek M. Schwahn

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act amends Georgia’s eminent domain laws by providing an exception to the general rule that condemnations cannot be converted to any use, other than a public use, for twenty years. The Act creates a new procedure which requires the condemnor to petition the jurisdiction’s superior court to determine whether the property is blighted property. Additionally, the condemnor must provide notice to all owners of the alleged blighted property. If the court finds the land is blighted property, the condemnor must file a petition to condemn the property according to the established procedure set forth in Article 3 ...


Hb 1 - Space Flight, Malissa Caroline Barger, Ethan L. Smith 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 1 - Space Flight, Malissa Caroline Barger, Ethan L. Smith

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act limits the civil and criminal liability of a space flight entity for injuries sustained by space flight participants arising from ordinary negligence. The Act defines new terms and provides a statutory waiver form that participants with informed consent must sign. The Act mandates space flight participants sign the waiver before participating in any space flight activity. The Act does not limit the liability of space flight entities for gross negligence or intentional acts, nor does it prevent suits from anyone other than the space flight participant.


Bitterrooters For Planning, Inc. V. Montana Department Of Environmental Quality, Rebecca A. Newsom 2018 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Bitterrooters For Planning, Inc. V. Montana Department Of Environmental Quality, Rebecca A. Newsom

Public Land and Resources Law Review

In Bitterrooters for Planning, Inc. v. Montana Department of Environmental Quality, the Montana Supreme Court found that the Montana Department of Environmental Quality did not violate the Montana Environmental Policy Act when the department issued a wastewater discharge permit for a large retail merchandise store. This decision enforced a narrow interpretation of agency requirements under the Montana Department of Environmental Quality Act, focusing only on direct effects with a close causal connection to the agency action.


Barren River Lake - Relating To (Sc 3166), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2018 Western Kentucky University

Barren River Lake - Relating To (Sc 3166), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3166. Transcript of trial proceedings in United States of America v. 2,635.04 Acres of Land, Etc. (Tracts 125, 127, 130, 131 – Franklin Berry and Ruby Berry), a case heard in U.S. District Court, Western District of Kentucky at Bowling Green on 16 October 1962. At issue was the compensation to be awarded to Franklin and Ruby Berry for the taking of lands in Allen County, Kentucky, by the U.S. Government in connection with the construction ofBarren River Reservoir No. 2, also known as the Port Oliver Dam. A jury ...


The Use Of Property Law Tools For Soil Protection, Jessica Owley 2018 University at Buffalo School of Law

The Use Of Property Law Tools For Soil Protection, Jessica Owley

Contributions to Books

Published in International Yearbook of Soil Law and Policy 2017, Harald Ginzky, Elizabeth Dooley, Irene L. Heuser, Emmanuel Kasimbazi, Till Markus & Tianbao Qin, eds.

Open Access This book is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license and indicate if changes were made.

The images or other third party material in this book are included in the book’s ...


Israel's Absentee Property Law: When Is Democratic Failure Necessary?, Bria Smith 2018 Claremont McKenna College

Israel's Absentee Property Law: When Is Democratic Failure Necessary?, Bria Smith

CMC Senior Theses

This paper defends Israel's expropriation of property under the Absentee Property Law within the state’s pre-1967 borders on constitutional grounds, but holds that the Law’s increased use in the region of East Jerusalem is invalid under Israel's constitutional scheme. This distinction turns upon the state’s application of the Law for necessary purposes. I hold that Israel’s justification for breaching human rights explicitly protected must be based on the state’s need to preserve its foundational ideology and national purpose in times of extra-normal circumstances. Israel may act undemocratically only to the extent imperative to ...


Whose Lands? Which Public? Trump's National Monument Proclamations And The Shape Of Public-Lands Law, Jedediah Purdy 2018 Duke Law School

Whose Lands? Which Public? Trump's National Monument Proclamations And The Shape Of Public-Lands Law, Jedediah Purdy

Faculty Scholarship

President Trump issued a proclamation in December 2017 purporting to remove two million acres in southern Utah from national monument status, radically shrinking the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument and splitting the Bears Ears National Monument into two residual protected areas. Whether the President has the power to revise or revoke existing monuments under the Antiquities Act, which creates the national monument system, is a new question of law for a 112-year-old statute that has been used by Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt to Barack Obama to protect roughly fifteen million acres of federal land and hundreds of millions of marine acres ...


Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney 2018 Texas A&M University School of Law

Non-Enforcement Takings, Timothy M. Mulvaney

Faculty Scholarship

The non-enforcement of existing property laws is not logically separable from the issue of unfair and unjust state deprivations of property rights at which the Constitution's Takings Clause takes aim. This Article suggests, therefore, that takings law should police allocations resulting from non-enforcement decisions on the same "fairness and justice" grounds that it polices allocations resulting from decisions to enact and enforce new regulations. Rejecting the extant majority position that state decisions not to enforce existing property laws are categorically immune from takings liability is not to advocate that persons impacted by such decisions should be automatically or even ...


Historic Preservation Law In A Nutshell (2d Ed.), Sara C. Bronin, Ryan M. Rowberry 2017 University of Connecticut

Historic Preservation Law In A Nutshell (2d Ed.), Sara C. Bronin, Ryan M. Rowberry

Ryan Rowberry

The purpose of this book is to provide a concise, coherent reference for the emerging field of historic preservation law for lawyers, policymakers, planners, architects, and students alike. We consider preservation law to be “emerging” because it began to fully develop in the United States only in the last fifty years. Two key transition points happened at the federal level: the 1966 passage of the National Historic Preservation Act and the 1978 Penn Central Supreme Court decision, which upheld a landmarks law against a constitutional challenge and consequently encouraged other localities to adopt similar ordinances. (Of course, this book covers ...


Review Of The Fight For Fair Housing: Causes, Consequences And Future Implications Of The 1968 Federal Fair Housing Act, Tim Iglesias 2017 University of San Francisco, School of Law

Review Of The Fight For Fair Housing: Causes, Consequences And Future Implications Of The 1968 Federal Fair Housing Act, Tim Iglesias

Tim Iglesias

This is a book review of The Fight for Fair Housing: Causes, Consequences and Future Implications of the 1968 Federal Fair Housing Act  ed. Gregory D. Squires (Routledge 2018).
In addition to summarizing and evaluating all 15 chapters this review highlights the two major contributions of the volume: (1) Some chapters (especially chapters 10, 11, 13, and 15) begin to articulate an argument that effective implementation of fair housing law is not just good for members of protected classes but valuable for everyone because it can help markets work better, promote democracy, and expand opportunity for all; (2) the chapters ...


Threading The Needle Of Fair Housing Law In A Gentrifying City With A Legacy Of Discrimination, Tim Iglesias 2017 University of San Francisco, School of Law

Threading The Needle Of Fair Housing Law In A Gentrifying City With A Legacy Of Discrimination, Tim Iglesias

Tim Iglesias

This essay tells the story of an extended and complex conflict between San Francisco and HUD and the creative solution that emerged from their negotiations. The conflict concerned the application of a community preference to a proposed senior housing development that would be located in a traditional African American neighborhood in San Francisco and its potential violation of federal fair housing law. After a brief background discussion of some of the policy and legal issues raised by community preferences, the essay tells the story of the conflict and its resolution. The essay concludes with reflections on the potential value of ...


Herr V. U.S. Forest Service, Peter B. Taylor 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Herr V. U.S. Forest Service, Peter B. Taylor

Public Land and Resources Law Review

In Herr v. U. S. Forest Service, the Sixth Circuit ruled on whether the Forest Service could infringe on pre-existing private property rights held adjacent to a designated Wilderness Area. The Herrs purchased lakefront property adjacent to the Sylvania Wilderness in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan with the intention of using their littoral rights for recreational boating. The Sylvania Wilderness was created under the Michigan Wilderness Act in 1987, but the Act observed valid existing rights. The court found that the Herrs’ littoral rights were recognizable “valid existing rights.” Therefore, the Forest Service’s restriction of those rights was illegal.


Some Model Amendments To Maine (And Other States') Land Use Control Legislation, Orlando E. Delogu, Sam Merrill, Philip R. Saucier 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Some Model Amendments To Maine (And Other States') Land Use Control Legislation, Orlando E. Delogu, Sam Merrill, Philip R. Saucier

Maine Law Review

This model legislation consisting of ten separate provisions is intended to clarify and/or expand existing Maine law dealing with planning and land use regulation. It expands existing statutes by addressing a number of issues not presently covered by law. The overarching purpose of the proposed legislation is to underscore that planning and the imposition of land use regulations is not exclusively the responsibility of local governments but instead is a shared duty of the state and local governments. This is clearly stated in the text and commentary of Provision I, and is a theme that pervades all ten legislative ...


Will Bell V. Town Of Wells Be Eroded With Time?, Sidney St. F. Thaxter 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Will Bell V. Town Of Wells Be Eroded With Time?, Sidney St. F. Thaxter

Maine Law Review

In 1989, the Maine Law Court issued a landmark decision regarding the ownership of the land between the mean high-water mark and the mean low-water mark (the intertidal zone) in a case entitled Bell v. Town of Wells.1 This decision was controlled, in part, by the 1986 decision in the same case. Bell I was decided following an appeal by the plaintiff-landowners from the lower court decision dismissing Counts I and II of their Complaint as “barred by sovereign immunity.” The lower court found that “the State has an interest in Moody Beach and in that sense it has ...


Tthe Requirement Of Domestic Participation In New Mining Ventures In Zambia, Muna Ndulo 2017 Unza School of Law

Tthe Requirement Of Domestic Participation In New Mining Ventures In Zambia, Muna Ndulo

Muna B Ndulo

No abstract provided.


The Impact Of The Tobacco Buyout On The Commonwealth's Open Spaces: Protecting Open Land By Expanding The Scope Of Use Value Assessment, Mary Atkinson 2017 College of William & Mary Law School

The Impact Of The Tobacco Buyout On The Commonwealth's Open Spaces: Protecting Open Land By Expanding The Scope Of Use Value Assessment, Mary Atkinson

William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review

No abstract provided.


Striking An Equitable Balance: Placing Reasonable Limits On Retroactive Zoning Changes After Kittery Retail Ventures, Llc V. Town Of Kittery, Heather B. Sanborn 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Striking An Equitable Balance: Placing Reasonable Limits On Retroactive Zoning Changes After Kittery Retail Ventures, Llc V. Town Of Kittery, Heather B. Sanborn

Maine Law Review

Thirty years ago, a developer who wanted to build a shopping center had to do little more than obtain a building permit to go forward with the project. Today, however, the regulation and review of development projects involves a lengthy process of securing a series of permits, often including site plan or subdivision approvals, traffic studies, and environmental impact reviews. Navigating this review process forces developers to negotiate with the community and design their projects to fit the applicable standards adopted by the local, state, and federal regulations, arguably improving the quality of development in our communities. But the lengthy ...


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