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Legal And Ethical Issues Associated With Employee Use Of Social Networks, Gundars Kaupins, Susan Park 2010 Boise State University

Legal And Ethical Issues Associated With Employee Use Of Social Networks, Gundars Kaupins, Susan Park

Management Faculty Publications and Presentations

Social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter can help employees enhance a company’s marketing, recruiting, security, and safety. However, employee’s use of social networking sites and employers’ access of those sites can result in illegal and unethical behavior, such as discrimination and privacy invasions. Companies must gauge whether and how to rely upon employees’ use of personal social networking sites and how much freedom employees should have in using networks inside and outside of the companies. This research summarizes the latest legal and ethical issues regarding employee use of social networks and provides recommended corporate policies.


Sidelined: Title Ix Retaliation Cases And Women's Leadership In College Athletics, Erin E. Buzuvis 2010 Western New England University School of Law

Sidelined: Title Ix Retaliation Cases And Women's Leadership In College Athletics, Erin E. Buzuvis

Faculty Scholarship

Discrimination against women seeking or serving in leadership positions in sport is worthy of analysis, not only for the sake of individual women who desire to self-actualize as a head coach or athletic administrator, but because the unique role of sport in society gives underrepresentation of women in leadership positions additional significance. Due to its high visibility and widespread appeal—its veritable iconic status—sport is a salient site of cultural production. That is, sport operates on a symbolic level, reflecting and transmitting shared cultural values. Among these values, sport helps define the attributes associated with leadership, and thus, derivatively ...


Pleading Disability, Joseph A. Seiner 2010 Boston College Law School

Pleading Disability, Joseph A. Seiner

Boston College Law Review

A significant failure. That is how the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) has been described by legal scholars and disability advocates alike. The statute was widely expected to help prevent disability discrimination in employment, but it has not fully achieved its intended purpose because of the narrow interpretation of the ADA by the courts. Congress recently sought to restore the employment protections of the ADA by amending the statute. Interpreting the complex and comprehensive amendments to the ADA will be a difficult task for the federal courts. Complicating matters further, the proper pleading standard for disability claims was left in ...


The Relative Bargaining Power Of Employers And Unions In The Global Information Age: A Comparative Analysis Of The United States And Japan, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Benjamin C. Ellis 2010 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The Relative Bargaining Power Of Employers And Unions In The Global Information Age: A Comparative Analysis Of The United States And Japan, Kenneth G. Dau-Schmidt, Benjamin C. Ellis

Articles by Maurer Faculty

In this paper, we examine and compare the impact of American and Japanese labor law on the relative bargaining power of the labor and management within the context of the new global economy based on information technology. We begin by providing a simple economic definition of bargaining power and examining how it can be influenced by economic and legal factors. Next, we discuss the impact of new information technology and the global economy on the employment relationship and how this has decreased union bargaining power relative to management bargaining power. Finally, we compare various facets of American and Japanese labor ...


Transnational Regulation Of Migration, Cristina M. Rodríguez 2010 Yale Law School

Transnational Regulation Of Migration, Cristina M. Rodríguez

Faculty Scholarship Series

Two significant conceptual errors frame the public debate
concerning labor migration and the related phenomenon of illegal
immigration. Each error stems from lawmakers’ failure or refusal to
recognize the ongoing and transnational nature of migration. First, the
immigration debate occurs largely within a domestic political framework,
and the assumption that the United States can address immigration
issues, particularly illegal immigration, through the perfection of
domestic enforcement mechanisms pervades the discourse. But
migration is inherently international, and its management requires
engagement with other governments and with social facts beyond U.S.
control. Second, the rhetorical emphasis placed on “fixing” our broken ...


Once, Twice, Or Three Times As Harmful? Ethnic Harassment, Gender Harassment, And Generalized Workplace Harassment, Jana L. Raver, Lisa Hisae Nishii 2010 Queen's University - Kingston, Ontario

Once, Twice, Or Three Times As Harmful? Ethnic Harassment, Gender Harassment, And Generalized Workplace Harassment, Jana L. Raver, Lisa Hisae Nishii

Articles and Chapters

Despite scholars’ and practitioners’ recognition that different forms of workplace harassment often co-occur in organizations, there is a paucity of theory and research on how these different forms of harassment combine to influence employees’ outcomes. We investigated the ways in which ethnic harassment (EH), gender harassment (GH), and generalized workplace harassment (GWH) combined to predict target individuals’ job-related, psychological, and health outcomes. Competing theories regarding additive, exacerbating, and inuring (i.e., habituating to hardships) combinations were tested. We also examined race and gender differences in employees’ reports of EH, GH, and GWH. The results of two studies revealed that EH ...


Who’S Running The Road?: Street Railway Strikes And The Problem Of Constructing A Liberal Capitalist Order In Canada, 1886-1914, Eric Tucker 2010 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Who’S Running The Road?: Street Railway Strikes And The Problem Of Constructing A Liberal Capitalist Order In Canada, 1886-1914, Eric Tucker

Articles & Book Chapters

Street railway strikes in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were frequently the occasion for large-scale collective violence in North American cities and challenged the capacity of local authorities to maintain civic order. However, this was only the most visible manifestation of the challenge that street railway workers’ collective action posed to the order of liberal capitalism, an order constructed on several intersecting dimensions. Using the example of Canadian street railway workers from 1886 to 1914, a period of rapid urbanization and industrialization, this article explores the ways the collective action by workers and their community sympathizers challenged the ...


Business-Like: The Supreme Court's 2009-2010 Labor And Employment Decisions, Melissa Hart 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Business-Like: The Supreme Court's 2009-2010 Labor And Employment Decisions, Melissa Hart

Articles

The 2009-10 Term at the Supreme Court was a relatively quiet one for labor and employment law. While the Justices were in the news for decisions on corporate political donations and the Second Amendment, the Court’s work-related docket grabbed no headlines. In fact, though, the Court considered 7 work law cases this Term, in areas ranging from standards for arbitration agreements to employee privacy rights in new technology to time limitations for filing Title VII disparate impact claims. This article discusses the Court’s labor and employment cases for the Term. While they may not have made much news ...


The Depression Era Sit-Down Strikes And The Limits Of Liberal Labor Law, Ahmed A. White 2010 University of Colorado Law School

The Depression Era Sit-Down Strikes And The Limits Of Liberal Labor Law, Ahmed A. White

Articles

This paper explores the history of sit-down strikes from the New Deal Era and beyond and traces their influence on the substance of modern labor law. It argues that, even as the sit-down strikes proved essential to the development of a meaningful system of labor rights, the strikes also had a very different effect. As this paper undertakes to demonstrate, legal and political attacks on labor rights that were originally aimed at the sit-down strikes metastasized into a more general campaign to prohibit a range of militant strike practices, even those bearing little outward resemblance to the original sit-down strikes ...


Reviving Employee Rights - Recent And Upcoming Employment Discrimination Legislation: Proceedings Of The 2010 Annual Meeting Of The Association Of American Law Schools Section On Employment Discrimination Law, Scott A. Moss, Sandra Sperino, Robin R. Runge, Charles A. Sullivan 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Reviving Employee Rights - Recent And Upcoming Employment Discrimination Legislation: Proceedings Of The 2010 Annual Meeting Of The Association Of American Law Schools Section On Employment Discrimination Law, Scott A. Moss, Sandra Sperino, Robin R. Runge, Charles A. Sullivan

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Meaning Of Just Cause In North Carolina Public Employment Law: Caroll And Its Progeny Provide For A Heightened Multifactor Standard For State Employee Disciplinary Cases, J. Michael McGuinness 2010 Campbell University School of Law

The Meaning Of Just Cause In North Carolina Public Employment Law: Caroll And Its Progeny Provide For A Heightened Multifactor Standard For State Employee Disciplinary Cases, J. Michael Mcguinness

Campbell Law Review

This Article explores the doctrine of just cause in North Carolina public employment law. After a review of the leading North Carolina Supreme Court case of N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources v. Carroll and its progeny, this Article examines applicable just cause standards and analytical tests so that the true meaning of just cause can be better understood. Multi-factor tests are applied in order to employ a more objective just cause standard and to avoid unprincipled conclusions not founded upon established criteria.


Choice Of Law And Employee Restrictive Covenants: An American Perspective, Gillian Lester, Elizabeth Ryan 2010 Columbia Law School

Choice Of Law And Employee Restrictive Covenants: An American Perspective, Gillian Lester, Elizabeth Ryan

Faculty Scholarship

Employees are increasingly mobile across state lines. This is partly the result of technological change facilitating individual movement and communication, but also a result of corresponding changes in corporate organization to establish offices and interests in multiple jurisdictions. With these developments, there has been a rise in litigation surrounding the enforcement of employee covenants not to compete when the parties or issues involved have connections to multiple jurisdictions. The emerging body of law intrigues and confounds lawyers and commentators because of its complexity and unpredictability. This essay is an effort to describe recent legal developments in the United States, situating ...


Honest-Services Fraud: A (Vague) Threat To Millions Of Blissfully Unaware (And Non-Culpable) American Workers, Julie R. O'Sullivan 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Honest-Services Fraud: A (Vague) Threat To Millions Of Blissfully Unaware (And Non-Culpable) American Workers, Julie R. O'Sullivan

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The author believes that statute 18 U.S.C. § 1346 is unconstitutionally vague, at least as applied to cases in which employees of private entities are prosecuted for depriving their employers of a right to their honest services (so-called “private cases”). Objections to vagueness rest on due process. “Vagueness may invalidate a criminal law for either of two independent reasons. First, it may fail to provide the kind of notice that will enable ordinary people to understand what conduct it prohibits; second, it may authorize and even encourage arbitrary and discriminatory enforcement.” The Supreme Court’s vagueness precedents do not ...


The Uses And Misuses Of Statistical Proof In Age Discrimination Claims, Thomas Tinkham 2010 William Mitchell College of Law

The Uses And Misuses Of Statistical Proof In Age Discrimination Claims, Thomas Tinkham

Faculty Scholarship

When it comes to statistics, age discrimination is different than other forms of discrimination. In most discrimination cases we can take the protected population and make appropriate adjustments for necessary characteristics like education and compare the results to the other employee groups.

With age discrimination this method does not work. It doesn’t work because the normal patterns of aging and promotion or wage increase distort the statistical result. Employees typically are promoted more quickly and receive the highest percentage wage increases in early years. However, they generally retain those benefits for life. Employees reach a high point in their ...


Three Transnational Discourses Of Labor Law In Domestic Reforms, Alvaro Santos 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

Three Transnational Discourses Of Labor Law In Domestic Reforms, Alvaro Santos

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Current labor law debates, in the United States and elsewhere, reflect entrenched discursive positions that make potential reform seem impossible. This Article identifies and examines the three most influential positions, which it names the “social,” “the neoliberal,” and the “rights-based” approach. It shows that these discursive positions are truly transnational in character. In contrast with conventional wisdom, which accepts the incompatibility of these positions, this Article creates a conceptual framework that productively combines elements from each to enrich the debates over labor law reform and to foster institutional imagination. Applying this framework, the Article examines the collective bargaining systems of ...


Pretext In Peril, Natasha T. Martin 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Pretext In Peril, Natasha T. Martin

Faculty Scholarship

This Article addresses the connections among substance, procedure, and equality in the American workplace. Exploring the deepening struggle for plaintiffs under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this Article seeks to add clarity to an enduring quandary—why does Title VII fail to combat the prejudicial disparate treatment it was designed to eradicate? This Article offers a critique of the hardships shouldered by plaintiffs in proving contemporary workplace discrimination.

Challenging the seemingly unfettered discretion of the courts in evaluating claims of workplace bias, this Article pursues the interplay of procedural and substantive law to expose how courts ...


The Duty Of Fair Representation: History And Scope, Thomas Kohler 2009 Boston College Law School

The Duty Of Fair Representation: History And Scope, Thomas Kohler

Thomas C. Kohler

No abstract provided.


Immigrant Workers And The Thirteenth Amendment, Maria Ontiveros 2009 University of San Francisco School of Law

Immigrant Workers And The Thirteenth Amendment, Maria Ontiveros

Maria L. Ontiveros

This chapter examines the treatment of immigrant workers through the lens of the Thirteenth Amendment. It examines how the intersection of labor and immigration laws impact immigrant workers in general, "guest workers" and undocumented immigrants. It argues that immigrant workers can be seen as a caste of nonwhite workers laboring beneath the floor for free labor in ways which violate the Thirteenth Amendment. Further, it suggests ways in which immigrant workers can use the Thirteenth Amendment to improve their situation and offers an analysis of how the Thirteenth Amendment can form a bridge for organizing between labor, civil rights, immigration ...


Riley J., Le Risposte Del Diritto Del Lavoro Australiano Alla Crisi Finanziaria Globale, In Lavoro E Diritto, No. 1/2010, Andrea Iossa 2009 Lund University - Faculty of Law

Riley J., Le Risposte Del Diritto Del Lavoro Australiano Alla Crisi Finanziaria Globale, In Lavoro E Diritto, No. 1/2010, Andrea Iossa

Andrea Iossa

No abstract provided.


Fifteen Years With The Norma Research Programme, Ann Numhauser-Henning 2009 Lund University

Fifteen Years With The Norma Research Programme, Ann Numhauser-Henning

Ann Numhauser-Henning

The Norma Research Programme started out fifteen years ago – in 1996 – at the Law Faculty of Lund University with funding from the Bank of Sweden Tercentenary Foundation. The programme was initiated by me and my former colleague Professor Anna Christensen, who sadly passed away in March 2001. Norma is short for ‘Normative Development within the Social Dimension, Studies on the Normative Patterns and Their Development in the Legal Regulation of Employment, Housing, Family and Social Security from a European Integration Perspective’. The purpose of the programme was to create a research environment where basic normative patterns and their development and ...


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