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The Metastasization Of Mandatory Arbitration, Alexander J.S. Colvin 2019 Cornell University

The Metastasization Of Mandatory Arbitration, Alexander J.S. Colvin

Chicago-Kent Law Review

Mandatory arbitration procedures have expanded to become a common feature of American employment relations. This article presents the results of a new original survey examining the extent of mandatory arbitration, where it is most commonly used, and which employees it is most likely to affect. Overall, 53.9 percent of private sector business establishments, representing 56.2 percent of nonunion employees, have mandatory arbitration procedures. Larger employers are more likely to have adopted mandatory arbitration, as are workplaces with lower paid employees. Mandatory arbitration is particularly common in California, North Carolina, and Texas, but is widespread nationwide. Class action waivers ...


Hushing Contracts, David A. Hoffman, Eric Lampmann 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Hushing Contracts, David A. Hoffman, Eric Lampmann

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The last few years have brought a renewed appreciation of the costs of nondisclosure agreements that suppress information about sexual wrongdoing. Recently passed bills in a number of states, including New York and California, has attempted to deal with such hush contracts. But such legislation is often incomplete, and many courts and commentators continue to ask if victims of harassment can sign enforceable settlements that conceal serious, potentially metastasizing, social harms. In this Article, we argue that employing the public policy doctrine, courts ought to generally refuse to enforce hush agreements, especially those created by organizations. We restate public policy ...


A Study Of Factors Influencing Hiring Decisions In The Context Of Ban The Box Policies, Ronald F. Day 2019 The Graduate Center, City University of New York

A Study Of Factors Influencing Hiring Decisions In The Context Of Ban The Box Policies, Ronald F. Day

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This dissertation investigates whether NYC employers adhered to Ban the Box by removing the question about criminal history from employment forms, by refraining from inquiring about an applicant’s criminal record during the interview process, and by complying with other aspects of the policy. The study also documents employer perspectives on Ban the Box and on the hiring of individuals with criminal convictions, and examines whether more individuals with a criminal record were hired after the policy was implemented.

Using a mixed-methods approach, surveys were administered to companies in the nonprofit and private sectors, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with ...


Likes And Retweets Can't Save Your Job: Public Employee Privacy, Free Speech, And Social Media, Frank E. Langan 2019 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Likes And Retweets Can't Save Your Job: Public Employee Privacy, Free Speech, And Social Media, Frank E. Langan

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Employee Right To Disconnect, Paul M. Secunda 2019 Marquette University Law School

The Employee Right To Disconnect, Paul M. Secunda

Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law

U.S. workers are increasingly finding it difficult to escape from work. Through their smartphones, e-mail, and social media, work tethers them to their workstations well after the work day has ended. Whether at home or in transit, employers are asking or requiring employees to complete assignments, tasks, and projects outside of working hours. This practice has a profound detrimental impact on employee privacy and autonomy, safety and health, productivity and compensation, and rest and leisure. France and Germany have responded to this emerging workplace issue by taking different legal approaches to providing their employees a right to disconnect from ...


Redefining Workplace Speech After Janus, Theo A. Lesczynski 2019 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Redefining Workplace Speech After Janus, Theo A. Lesczynski

Northwestern University Law Review

We have a First Amendment right to criticize the government. But this freedom does not translate into a right to criticize one’s boss even if, as for millions of Americans, one’s boss happens to be a government employer. Public employee speech doctrine has long established wide latitude for public employers to supervise their workers. Employees must show at the threshold that their speech was on a matter of public concern and not an internal workplace matter. The Supreme Court’s pronouncements over the last decade in a related doctrinal area, however, have unsettled the line demarcating workplace speech ...


Carrying Little Sticks: Is There A ‘Deterrence Gap’ In Employment Standards Enforcement In Ontario, Canada?, Eric Tucker, Leah F. Vosko, Mark P. Thomas, Rebecca Casey, John Grundy, Andrea M. Noack 2019 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Carrying Little Sticks: Is There A ‘Deterrence Gap’ In Employment Standards Enforcement In Ontario, Canada?, Eric Tucker, Leah F. Vosko, Mark P. Thomas, Rebecca Casey, John Grundy, Andrea M. Noack

Articles & Book Chapters

This article assesses whether a deterrence gap exists in the enforcement of the Ontario Employment Standards Act (ESA), which sets minimum conditions of employment in areas such as minimum wage, overtime pay and leaves. Drawing on a unique administrative data set, the paper measures the use of deterrence in Ontario’s ESA enforcement regime against the role of deterrence within two influential models of enforcement: responsive regulation and strategic enforcement. The article finds that the use of deterrence is below its prescribed role in either model of enforcement. We conclude that there is a deterrence gap in Ontario.


The Birth Of A Nation: A Study Of Slavery In Seventeenth-Century Virginia, Randolph M. McLaughlin 2019 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

The Birth Of A Nation: A Study Of Slavery In Seventeenth-Century Virginia, Randolph M. Mclaughlin

Pace Law Faculty Publications

Race based slavery in North America had its origins in seventeenth-century Virginia. Initially, the position of the African worker was similar to that of the indentured servants from England. During the early to mid-seventeenth century, both African and English indentured servants served for a period of years and received the protections to which a servant was entitled. However, during the 1640s there appeared examples of Africans also being held as slaves. Thus, during the seventeenth century there existed a dual system of servitude or bondage for the African worker. One basis for this duality was the common law practice that ...


Radical Reconstruction: (Re) Embracing Affirmative Action In Private Employment, Hina B. Shah 2019 Golden Gate University School of Law

Radical Reconstruction: (Re) Embracing Affirmative Action In Private Employment, Hina B. Shah

University of Baltimore Law Review

No abstract provided.


Following The Fifth Circuit: Title Vii As The Sole Remedy For Employment Discrimination On The Basis Of Sex In Educational Institutions Receiving Federal Funds, Alicia Martinez 2019 American University Washington College of Law

Following The Fifth Circuit: Title Vii As The Sole Remedy For Employment Discrimination On The Basis Of Sex In Educational Institutions Receiving Federal Funds, Alicia Martinez

American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law

No abstract provided.


The Essence Test: Picking Up A Supreme Court Fumble, Thomas Gentry 2018 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

The Essence Test: Picking Up A Supreme Court Fumble, Thomas Gentry

Catholic University Law Review

Labor arbitration is the primary mean by which employers and employees resolve disputes. The shortcomings of the Supreme Court’s jurisprudence on labor arbitration have intensified as more employees opt for arbitration. These shortcomings are no more apparent than with the National Football League and its players.

This Comment uses NFL player Adrian Peterson and his player-discipline arbitration process as an example of the gaps in the Supreme Court’s case law. The Supreme Court announced the Essence Test in 1960 with the seminal Steelworker Trilogy Cases. Since 1960, lower courts have been unable to consistently apply the test, leading ...


Is A Delayed Result A Just Result? The Use Of Laches As An Equitable Defense To Remedial Back Pay Under The Eeoc's Sovereignty, Ruth Ann Mueller 2018 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Is A Delayed Result A Just Result? The Use Of Laches As An Equitable Defense To Remedial Back Pay Under The Eeoc's Sovereignty, Ruth Ann Mueller

Catholic University Law Review

The equitable defense of laches generally cannot be used against the sovereign. This broad proposition, adopted from English Courts of Equity, cements itself in United States federal case law. It is a longstanding principle that the federal government protects the public good and must be exempt from the defenses that could be brought up in a private suit. Administrative agencies bear a similar role, and exemption, when litigating as the United States on behalf of the public.

However, courts do not affirmatively restrict the use of laches against administrative agencies who may be acting on behalf of a private litigant ...


Case Note: Case Of Araya V. Nevsun Resources Ltd In The Canadian Courts, Jolene Hansell 2018 University of Ottawa

Case Note: Case Of Araya V. Nevsun Resources Ltd In The Canadian Courts, Jolene Hansell

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

No abstract provided.


The Multiple Justifications Of Occupational Licensing, Nick Robinson 2018 University of Washington School of Law

The Multiple Justifications Of Occupational Licensing, Nick Robinson

Washington Law Review

Nearly a quarter of all workers in the United States are currently in a job that requires an occupational license. As the prevalence of occupational licensing has grown, so have claims that its overuse is causing increased consumer costs and impairing labor mobility and economic freedom. To address these concerns, many policymakers and academics argue that licensing restrictions should be more closely tailored to the goal of protecting the public from harm and that, to guard against capture, practitioners should not regulate their own licensing. Federal courts, in turn, have drawn on this vision of the proper role of occupational ...


Hb 701 - Public Officers And Employees, Michael C. Freeman Jr., Monica Laredo Ruiz 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 701 - Public Officers And Employees, Michael C. Freeman Jr., Monica Laredo Ruiz

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act amends Georgia’s statute to give state employers the authority to drug test certain applicants to various public positions. The Act adds opioids, opioid analgesics, and opioid derivatives to the list of drugs for which state employers may screen.


#Metoo & Tax, Margaret Ryznar 2018 Indiana University McKinney School of Law

#Metoo & Tax, Margaret Ryznar

Washington and Lee Law Review Online

Recently, legislative efforts have taken aim at sexual harassment in the workplace. Among these may be a surprising but effective approach—disallowing tax deductions for sexual harassment settlements subject to non-disclosure agreements. This Essay analyzes such a 2017 tax reform provision.


Ilo Convention 185 On Seafarers' Identity Document Thirteen Years After Entering Into Force: Analysing Implementation Challenges And Future Outlook, Vera Njeng Ntungwe 2018 World Maritime University

Ilo Convention 185 On Seafarers' Identity Document Thirteen Years After Entering Into Force: Analysing Implementation Challenges And Future Outlook, Vera Njeng Ntungwe

World Maritime University Dissertations

No abstract provided.


Discriminatory Job Knowledge Tests, Police Promotions, And What Title Vii Can Learn From Tort Law, Mark S. Brodin 2018 Boston College Law School

Discriminatory Job Knowledge Tests, Police Promotions, And What Title Vii Can Learn From Tort Law, Mark S. Brodin

Boston College Law Review

Nationally, the continued use of selection devices by police departments—such as multiple-choice examinations requiring memorization of police manuals—stifles advancement for a disproportionate number of otherwise qualified minority candidates, and hinders the desired diversification of the upper ranks. These exams have little to do with predicting success as a sergeant or other police supervisor. The traditional Title VII approach, a disparate impact challenge, has proven unsatisfactory given the relative ease with which the exams can be “content validated” in court. This Article proposes a new approach familiar to tort lawyers—the inference of intent from actions taken with foreseeable ...


If Anyone Is Listening, #Metoo: Breaking The Culture Of Silence Around Sexual Abuse Through Regulating Non-Disclosure Agreements And Secret Settlements, Vasundhara Prasad 2018 Boston College Law School

If Anyone Is Listening, #Metoo: Breaking The Culture Of Silence Around Sexual Abuse Through Regulating Non-Disclosure Agreements And Secret Settlements, Vasundhara Prasad

Boston College Law Review

Secrecy is an ally of sexual violence. For decades, victims of sexual abuse have remained silent about their experiences. The recent emergence of the #MeToo movement in the aftermath of the scandals surrounding movie mogul Harvey Weinstein and television personalities Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly raises larger questions about whether employers are partly to blame because of the widespread use of non-disclosure agreements in settlements. The movement, while exposing the magnitude of the problem, also makes it clear that silencing victims’ speech means that sexual violence will never truly be settled. This Note argues that non-disclosure agreements in cases ...


Who Can “Seize The Day?”: Analyzing Who Is An “Employee” For Purposes Of Unionization And Collective Bargaining Through The Lens Of The “Newsie” Strike Of 1899, Hannah Esquenazi 2018 Boston College Law School

Who Can “Seize The Day?”: Analyzing Who Is An “Employee” For Purposes Of Unionization And Collective Bargaining Through The Lens Of The “Newsie” Strike Of 1899, Hannah Esquenazi

Boston College Law Review

In the summer of 1899, the Newsboys of New York banded together, formed a union, and began to “strike” against two of the city’s largest newspapers in response to a price increase. After a two-week struggle, the newspaper companies agreed to compromise by buying back any unsold papers at the end of the day from the Newsboys. They did not, however, agree to the Newsboys’ classification of the effort as a “strike.” The newspapers saw this as a boycott of non-employees, or independent contractors. After the turn of the century, Congress began to pass laws protecting employees, and in ...


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