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An Analysis Of Juvenile Gun Violence Mitigation In Columbia, South Carolina, Amelia Shook 2023 University of South Carolina - Columbia

An Analysis Of Juvenile Gun Violence Mitigation In Columbia, South Carolina, Amelia Shook

Senior Theses

Over the past ten years, the United States has been impacted by the increasing frequency of homicides due to gun violence. Juvenile homicides via firearms are examined on a national, state, and county level by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and analyzed to showcase adjusted age and years of potential life lost due to gun violence. Data obtained through a CDC database depicts the geographic areas being examined: United States, South Carolina, and Richland County. South Carolina will be singled out and examined individually as it ranks eighth highest in the United States for gun violence. Richland …


Disrupting The School-To-Prison Pipeline: The Development Of Strong, Stable Relationships, MacKiah Hoff 2023 Lipscomb University

Disrupting The School-To-Prison Pipeline: The Development Of Strong, Stable Relationships, Mackiah Hoff

Senior Capstone Papers

The “school-to-prison pipeline” is a disturbing national trend where school policies and practices unjustly funnel children—namely children who are Black and Brown and/or have disabilities—into the Juvenile Justice system. Students of color are far more likely to be suspended, expelled, or arrested for the same kind of behavior as their white peers, and youth with disabilities are acutely affected by schools who ignore due process protections. Such students would benefit from extra supports and resources but instead face zero-tolerance policies, exclusionary discipline, and unreasonable difficulties with re-entry into school. The following research presents a review of current literature as it …


Childist Objections, Youthful Relevance, And Evidence Reconceived, Mae C. Quinn 2023 Penn State Dickinson Law

Childist Objections, Youthful Relevance, And Evidence Reconceived, Mae C. Quinn

Dickinson Law Review (2017-Present)

Evidence rules are written by and for adults. As a result, they largely lack the vantage point of youth and are rooted in arm’s-length assumptions about the lives and legal interests of young people. Moreover, because children have been mostly treated as evidentiary afterthoughts, they have been patched into the justice system and its procedures in a piecemeal fashion. Yet, to date, there has been no comprehensive scholarly critique of evidence principles and practices for failing to meaningfully account for youth. And the evidentiary intersection of youth and race has been almost entirely overlooked in legal scholarship. This Article, in …


Kids, Cognition, And Confinement: Evaluating Claims Of Inadequate Access To Mental Health Care In Juvenile Detention Facilities, Lydia G. Mrowiec 2023 William & Mary Law School

Kids, Cognition, And Confinement: Evaluating Claims Of Inadequate Access To Mental Health Care In Juvenile Detention Facilities, Lydia G. Mrowiec

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

In the United States, almost 60,000 juveniles are incarcerated in juvenile jails and prisons every day, and, as of March 2021, at least seventy percent of juveniles in the juvenile justice system have a mental health condition. For many young adults, prison and detention centers have “become the avenue of last resort” for treatment of those mental health conditions. However, juvenile detention facilities lack the support and resources to provide adequate care, which has led to high recidivism in the juvenile population. Juveniles, and individuals on their behalf, can challenge inadequate access to mental health resources by bringing claims under …


Florida's Baker Act Laws: How Florida's Excessive Use Of Baker Acts Can Be Harmful To Children, Kaitlin Gibbs 2023 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Florida's Baker Act Laws: How Florida's Excessive Use Of Baker Acts Can Be Harmful To Children, Kaitlin Gibbs

Gator TeamChild Juvenile Law Clinic

The goal of this White Paper is to provide an overview of Florida’s Baker Act Laws. Additionally, this White Paper will show how the excessive use of Baker Acts in Florida can have harmful effects on children, especially those in the dependency system, and potential solutions to reform the Baker Act process.


Sticky Situations: Understanding The Law And Life, Krystal Banks 2023 Banks Services

Sticky Situations: Understanding The Law And Life, Krystal Banks

National Youth Advocacy and Resilience Conference

Law and life go hand in hand. Understanding the law and how it connects to life can be an effective tool in teaching youth and adults the value of making good decisions when it comes to life and the law. Sticky Situations places real-world situations in the context of learning how to apply the law and effectively respond to life's sticky situations.


Inadmissibility: Solving Questionable Consent To Juvenile Interrogations, Wilson Baer 2023 Brooklyn Law School

Inadmissibility: Solving Questionable Consent To Juvenile Interrogations, Wilson Baer

Brooklyn Law Review

Around the country, juveniles are brought in by police officers for the purpose of interrogations. Juveniles have the same constitutionally mandated protections as adults do and so they are read the same Miranda rights as adults are (or alternatively a version tailored specifically for juveniles). However, it is generally understood that, due to ongoing brain development, juveniles merit increased protections relative to adults. Generally, the solution to the problem has been to add an advocate for the child in the interrogation room. Usually, states have accomplished this by mandating parent presence, and some have mandated attorney presence. While these individuals …


The Supreme Court Rolls Back The Clock For Juvenile Justice, Jack Lyons 2023 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Supreme Court Rolls Back The Clock For Juvenile Justice, Jack Lyons

GGU Law Review Blog

For decades, the Supreme Court has protected juveniles from harsh punishments, such as mandatory life without parole (LWOP), by acknowledging that children are different and must be sentenced accordingly. The developmental differences in children make it nearly impossible to determine that a child who commits a crime is beyond hope for rehabilitation. Jones v. Mississippi turned back the clock on juvenile justice by holding that sentencers need not find a child is “permanently incorrigible” before sentencing them to life without parole.


Table Of Contents, Children's Legal Rights Journal 2023 Loyola University Chicago, School of Law

Table Of Contents, Children's Legal Rights Journal

Children's Legal Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Denormalizing Harm To Migrant Children In The U.S. Immigration System: A Comparative Perspective, Sarah J. Diaz, Oneida Vargas 2023 Loyola University Chicago Law School

Denormalizing Harm To Migrant Children In The U.S. Immigration System: A Comparative Perspective, Sarah J. Diaz, Oneida Vargas

Children's Legal Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


The Case For The Prohibition Of Corporal Punishment In The U.S., Katie Coyle 2023 NYU School of Law

The Case For The Prohibition Of Corporal Punishment In The U.S., Katie Coyle

Children's Legal Rights Journal

It is undeniable that the United States ("U.S.") has experienced significant social changes within the past 150 years. Social progress has been made regarding issues related to both race and gender. For example, until the 1870s, men were legally entitled to physically chastise their wives. It was just a decade prior to this that slavery had been abolished. At the root of these issues was the notion that women and people of color were not autonomous holders of rights, but rather were "property" that belonged to their owners or partners. Arguably, one area of U.S. civil rights where this concept …


Moral Injury: The Undiagnosed Epidemic Spread Through The Family Policing System And A Call For Abolition, Leyda M. Garcia-Greenawalt 2023 Loyola University Chicago Law School

Moral Injury: The Undiagnosed Epidemic Spread Through The Family Policing System And A Call For Abolition, Leyda M. Garcia-Greenawalt

Children's Legal Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Parenting Prison: How Mass Incarceration Of Parents Affects Child Development, Bridget Boland 2023 Loyola University Chicago Law School

Parenting Prison: How Mass Incarceration Of Parents Affects Child Development, Bridget Boland

Children's Legal Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


"We Can't Hear You": A Call For Right To Counsel For Youth In Care, Leyda Garcia-Greenawalt 2023 Loyola University Chicago Law School

"We Can't Hear You": A Call For Right To Counsel For Youth In Care, Leyda Garcia-Greenawalt

Children's Legal Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Protecting Children's Privacy Rights: A Preventative Measure For Suicide Among Children, Abigail Magat 2023 Loyola University Chicago Law School

Protecting Children's Privacy Rights: A Preventative Measure For Suicide Among Children, Abigail Magat

Children's Legal Rights Journal

Article 16 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Child (UNCRC) broadly entitles children to protections of their privacy and reputations. Under the UNCRC, nations have pledged to uphold any protections necessary to protect children against such attacks or interference regarding their honor and reputation. Among the 196 member states of this convention, very few have specific legislation dedicated to protecting children's privacy rights. As the cyberworld has increasingly become heavily accessible to children, so has the notion that their reputation and honor revolve around how they are perceived on the internet. Nevertheless, throughout most member states, privacy …


Organizations Behind Ending The Gun Violence Epidemic, Melissa Spero 2023 Loyola University Chicago Law School

Organizations Behind Ending The Gun Violence Epidemic, Melissa Spero

Children's Legal Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Is Florida Ready For The Universal School Choice Bill?, Joseline Vargas 2023 Loyola University Chicago Law School

Is Florida Ready For The Universal School Choice Bill?, Joseline Vargas

Children's Legal Rights Journal

Educational inequities can affect someone's future; school choice is meant to bridge the gap between those that receive a better education and those unable to receive one due to financial hardships to ensure a better future for students. While in numerous occasions school choice is a student's saving grace from a failed system, regulations must be in place to ensure that the people that are being helped by the law are those who need it, not just want it. Florida, following the school choice movement, has introduced the Universal School Choice Bill, which has now been voted in and signed. …


Razing & Rebuilding Delinquency Courts: Demolishing The Flawed Philosophical Foundation Of Parens Patriae, Eduardo R. Ferrer 2023 Georgetown Juvenile Justice Clinic & Initiative

Razing & Rebuilding Delinquency Courts: Demolishing The Flawed Philosophical Foundation Of Parens Patriae, Eduardo R. Ferrer

Loyola University Chicago Law Journal

Professor Eduardo R. Ferrer of Georgetown University explores the history and background of the juvenile delinquent system in the United States. Professor Ferrer argues that the philosophical underpinnings of our legal youth systems, under the concept of parens patriae, have led to failure with regard to how states care for children that come under their control—and ultimately need to be abandoned in favor of a more effective and just system.


A Child’S Constitutional Right To Family Integrity And Counsel In Dependency Proceedings, Rachel Kennedy 2023 Emory University School of Law

A Child’S Constitutional Right To Family Integrity And Counsel In Dependency Proceedings, Rachel Kennedy

Emory Law Journal

Since the child welfare system’s inception, abuse and neglect laws have conflated poverty-related neglect with active parental violence and willful neglect. The ensuing state surveillance has disproportionately harmed poor children and children of color. Pursuant to the state’s expansive parens patriae authority, countless families are investigated, and thousands of children are separated from their caretakers each year—only to be returned within days or weeks after a finding that the reasons for removal were unsubstantiated. Other children risk drifting in foster care limbo until they experience the termination of parental rights—an adjudication so severe that some courts call it the “civil …


Introduction To Issue Three, Paul W. Kucinski 2023 Loyola University Chicago

Introduction To Issue Three, Paul W. Kucinski

Loyola University Chicago Law Journal

No abstract provided.


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