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United States V. Pho: Defining The Limits Of Discretionary Sentencing, John G. Wheatley 2017 University of Maine School of Law

United States V. Pho: Defining The Limits Of Discretionary Sentencing, John G. Wheatley

Maine Law Review

In the consolidated case of United States v. Pho, the government appealed two district court rulings that imposed criminal sentences outside of the range provided in the Federal Sentencing Guidelines Manual (Guidelines). At separate trials, both defendants pied guilty to the crime of possession with intent to distribute five grams or more of cocaine base (commonly known as crack). Rejecting the Guidelines' disparate treatment of crack and powder cocaine, the district court imposed sentences that were below the Guidelines' range, but above the statutory mandatory minimum. The Court of Appeals for the First Circuit vacated both sentences and remanded the ...


Corpus Linguistics: Misfire Or More Ammo For The Ordinary - Meaning Canon?, John D. Ramer 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Corpus Linguistics: Misfire Or More Ammo For The Ordinary - Meaning Canon?, John D. Ramer

Michigan Law Review

Scholars and judges have heralded corpus linguistics—the study of language through collections of spoken or written texts—as a novel tool for statutory interpretation that will help provide an answer in the occasionally ambiguous search for “ordinary meaning” using dictionaries. In the spring of 2016, the Michigan Supreme Court became the first to use corpus linguistics in a majority opinion. The dissent also used it, however, and the two opinions reached different conclusions. In the first true test for corpus linguistics, the answer seemed to be just as ambiguous as before.

This result calls into question the utility of ...


Newsroom: Courtroom Dedicated To Judge Selya 10-30-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Courtroom Dedicated To Judge Selya 10-30-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Moral Issues And The Virtuous Judge: Reflections On The Nomination And Confirmation Of Supreme Court Justices, Robert J. Araujo, S.J. 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Moral Issues And The Virtuous Judge: Reflections On The Nomination And Confirmation Of Supreme Court Justices, Robert J. Araujo, S.J.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Guideline Amendments Dramatically Change The Structure Of Organizational Fines, Paul E. Fiorelli 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Guideline Amendments Dramatically Change The Structure Of Organizational Fines, Paul E. Fiorelli

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


The Judge And His Clerks, Barbara F. Riegelhaupt, Kaighn Smith Jr., J. Peter Byrne 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Judge And His Clerks, Barbara F. Riegelhaupt, Kaighn Smith Jr., J. Peter Byrne

Maine Law Review

In his memoir, Life and Times in the Three Branches, Judge Coffin recounts the history of the institution of the law clerk and observes, “I was the first such creature Maine had seen.” He served as a clerk from April 1947 to June 1949 for United States District Court Judge John D. Clifford, working in the same chambers that he would later inhabit as a judge. Over the course of his more than four decades on the Court of Appeals, Judge Coffin would have sixty-eight clerks of his own. Those of us lucky enough to be in that family of ...


The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Speeches Of Frank M. Coffin: A Sideline To Judging, Daniel E. Wathen, Barbara Riegelhaupt

Maine Law Review

The Authors of this Article are engaged in a separate project to publish the full collection of law-related speeches delivered by Judge Coffin during his tenure on the bench. That collection in its entirety consists of more than 125 speeches, and it is a treasure trove of thoughts on the judiciary as an institution, the law, judging, the legal profession, legal education, and legal luminaries past and present. The speeches are also worthy of study purely as examples of communication, advocacy, speechcraft, composition, humor, and whimsy. Within the confines of this Article, the modest goal is to provide samples of ...


In His Own Words: Judge Coffin And Workability, William C. Kelly Jr. 2017 University of Maine School of Law

In His Own Words: Judge Coffin And Workability, William C. Kelly Jr.

Maine Law Review

Early in his judicial career, Judge Coffin proffered the concept of “workability” as one of the core factors in judging. Justice and Workability: Un Essai, his first published reflection on this idea, appeared in the Suffolk University Law Review in 1971. To frame the discussion, he started with a formal definition: “[T]he extent to which a rule protecting a right, enforcing a duty, or setting a standard of conduct—which is consistent with and in the interests of social justice—can be pronounced with reasonable expectation of effective observance without impairing the essential functioning of those to whom the ...


The Ways Of A Judge And On Appeal, Kermit V. Lipez 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Ways Of A Judge And On Appeal, Kermit V. Lipez

Maine Law Review

What do you do when your judicial hero, the author of two important books on appellate judging, was for many years your neighbor, friend, colleague, and mentor? You revel in your good fortune, and you share your admiration for his books. Judge Coffin’s long involvement in the political world contributed significantly to a primary focus of his two books on appellate judging, The Ways of a Judge, published in 1980, and On Appeal, published in 1994. As a political organizer, a candidate for public office, a Congressman, and an administrator in a federal agency, Judge Coffin understood his accountability ...


Coffin's Court: A Colleague's View, Levin Campbell 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Coffin's Court: A Colleague's View, Levin Campbell

Maine Law Review

These reminiscences focus on the eleven years, from 1972 to 1983, that Frank M. Coffin of Maine was the Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. While Coffin’s judicial career extended over more than forty years, I chose this period because it was a time when his influence over the court’s work was at its peak, as well as because he himself later singled it out as a “judicial Garden of Eden,” during which the First Circuit enjoyed its status as the last remaining three-judge federal court of appeals in the nation.


Frank Morey Coffin's Political Years: Prelude To A Judgeship, Donald E. Nicoll 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Frank Morey Coffin's Political Years: Prelude To A Judgeship, Donald E. Nicoll

Maine Law Review

Each day when I go to my study, I see a wood block print of two owls gazing at me with unblinking eyes. Ever alert, they remind me of the artist, who in his neat, fine hand, titled the print “Deux Hiboux,” inscribed it to the recipients and signed it simply “FMC 8-2-87.” In addition to his talents as an artist and friend in all seasons, FMC was a remarkable public servant in all three branches of the federal government and, with his friend and colleague Edmund S. Muskie, a creative political reformer for the State of Maine. Throughout his ...


Frank Coffin And Enlightened Governance, Robert A. Katzmann 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Frank Coffin And Enlightened Governance, Robert A. Katzmann

Maine Law Review

I have often thought that Judge Frank M. Coffin is one of a handful of statesmen of recent times I could easily imagine in Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 (indeed, as a central figure in a David McCollough biography). If he had been, as competing factions struggled to find solutions to thorny issues, Madison’s Notes would inevitably and often have recorded: “With negotiations on the verge of collapse, all eyes turned to Frank Coffin, who found not only the key to compromise, but also the better way.”


The Legacy Of Judge Frank M. Coffin, Peter R. Pitegoff 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Legacy Of Judge Frank M. Coffin, Peter R. Pitegoff

Maine Law Review

Judge Coffin had adopted the University of Maine School of Law as if it were his own. He was a committed friend to the Law School and served on the advisory Board of Visitors for almost two decades. Like so many others, I felt his keen personal commitment as well, with his periodic calls and visits, his steady counsel and encouragement. Before arriving in Maine, I had known of Judge Coffin. Little did I anticipate that he would so enrich my experience as Dean at Maine Law. He remains a role model to so many of our graduates and leaves ...


Legalish, Curtis E.A. Karnow 2017 California Superior Court (San Francisco)

Legalish, Curtis E.A. Karnow

Curtis E.A. Karnow

The article urges plain English writing, and suggests abandoning words and phrases only used in the legal world.  Clarity and simplicity not only benefit judges but also enfranchises the lay public, which the legal system is meant to serve.


Adjudication In The Age Of Disagreement, John Fabian Witt 2017 Yale Law School

Adjudication In The Age Of Disagreement, John Fabian Witt

Fordham Law Review

In the time I have here with you today I would like to offer the beginnings of an answer. It does not lie in the distance between the court’s traditions and Manton’s conduct. That would be too easy. At base, I think the answer lies in something far more subtle and interesting: the relationship between acentral tradition of the Second Circuit and one of the great questions we face as a society today. That question is how to deal with disagreement.


Affirming Firm Sanctions: The Authority To Sanction Law Firms Under 28 U.S.C. § 1927, Vincent J. Margiotta 2017 Fordham University School of Law

Affirming Firm Sanctions: The Authority To Sanction Law Firms Under 28 U.S.C. § 1927, Vincent J. Margiotta

Fordham Law Review

A circuit split exists as to whether 28 U.S.C. § 1927 allows for an award of sanctions against nonattorneys or nonrepresentatives. Five federal courts of appeals—the Second, Third, Eighth, Eleventh, and the District of Columbia Circuits—hold that, to further the purpose of 28 U.S.C. § 1927, courts have the authority to sanction a law firm for the conduct of its attorneys, in addition to the authority to sanction individual officers of the court. The Sixth, Seventh, and Ninth Circuits disagree, concluding that the statute allows federal courts to sanction only individuals—“attorney[s] or other person ...


Toward A Theory Of Judicial Decisionmaking: A Synthesis Of Ideologist Jurisprudence And Doctrinalism, Raymond A. Belliotti 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Toward A Theory Of Judicial Decisionmaking: A Synthesis Of Ideologist Jurisprudence And Doctrinalism, Raymond A. Belliotti

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Governor Raimondo On Rwu Law 09-19-2017, Roger Williams University School of Law 2017 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: Governor Raimondo On Rwu Law 09-19-2017, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Stare Decisis Sed Concreta Intelligence - Precedent And Lonergan's Common Sense, William R. Moriarty 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Stare Decisis Sed Concreta Intelligence - Precedent And Lonergan's Common Sense, William R. Moriarty

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


Judicial Activism - The Violation Of An Oath, Edward J. Melvin, C.M. 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Judicial Activism - The Violation Of An Oath, Edward J. Melvin, C.M.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


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