Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Internet Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,177 Full-Text Articles 3,366 Authors 2,186,894 Downloads 133 Institutions

All Articles in Internet Law

Faceted Search

4,177 full-text articles. Page 7 of 107.

"The Exclusive Right To Their Writings": Copyright And Control In The Digital Age, Jane C. Ginsburg 2017 University of Maine School of Law

"The Exclusive Right To Their Writings": Copyright And Control In The Digital Age, Jane C. Ginsburg

Maine Law Review

The recent coincidence of new technology and new legislation in the United States may have enhanced the ability of U.S. copyright owners to wield electronic protective measures to control the exploitation of their works. The legislation, which reinforces the technology, has led many to perceive and to deplore a resulting imbalance between copyright owners and the copyright-using public. Critics assert that the goals of copyright law have never been, and should not now become, to grant “control” over works of authorship. Instead, copyright should accord certain limited rights over some kinds of exploitations. Economic incentives to create may be ...


The Unicorn Governance Trap, Renee M. Jones 2017 Boston College Law School

The Unicorn Governance Trap, Renee M. Jones

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The recent trend of large-scale start-up companies delaying an IPO creates a new kind of corporate governance problem. The prevalence of “unicorns” – privately held companies with market valuations of $1 billion or more – means the disciplinary mechanisms on which investors traditionally relied no longer function to prevent misconduct or mismanagement by unicorn founders. High profile frauds by unicorns like Zenefits and Theranos, and the recent travails of Uber highlight the need to rethink unicorn governance structure. These burgeoning controversies call for reconsideration of legal reforms that allow unicorns to remain for protracted periods in an ill-defined limbo between private and ...


An Economic Analysis Of The Law Surrounding Data Aggregation In Cyberspace, Johnathan M. H. Short 2017 University of Maine School of Law

An Economic Analysis Of The Law Surrounding Data Aggregation In Cyberspace, Johnathan M. H. Short

Maine Law Review

The emergence of technological advances has traditionally created new and unique legal problems. The solutions to counter these problems are often drawn from our legal traditions and adapted to an ever-modernizing world. However, as Professor Coase opined at the dawn of the communication technology revolution, “lawyers and economists should not be so overwhelmed by the emergence of new technologies as to change the existing legal and economic system without first making quite certain that this is required.” Examination and reflection, in other words, is paramount to instituting a sound legal framework to encompass developing legal problems in technology. This Article ...


Desperately Seeking Solutions: Using Implementation-Based Solutions For The Troubles Of Information Privacy In The Age Of Data Mining And The Internet Society, Tal Z. Zarsky 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Desperately Seeking Solutions: Using Implementation-Based Solutions For The Troubles Of Information Privacy In The Age Of Data Mining And The Internet Society, Tal Z. Zarsky

Maine Law Review

Our personal information is constantly being recorded, stored and analyzed. Commercial entities watch our every action, storing this data and analyzing it in conjunction with information acquired from third parties. These entities use this knowledge to their benefit (and at times, our detriment) by discriminating between various customers on the basis of this personal information. At the same time, in the media market, large conglomerates can now provide specifically tailored content to individual customers on the basis of such data, thus potentially controlling their perspectives and impairing their autonomy. The expanding use of data mining applications, which enable vendors to ...


Freeing The Mind: Free Software And The Death Of Proprietary Culture, Eben Moglen 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Freeing The Mind: Free Software And The Death Of Proprietary Culture, Eben Moglen

Maine Law Review

The subject matter we are going to talk about is variously named and the words have some resonances of importance. I am going to use the phrase “Free Software” to describe this material, and I am going to suggest to you that the choice of words is relevant. We are talking not merely about a form of production or a system of industrial relations, but also about the beginning of a social movement with specific political goals, which will characterize not only the production of software in the twenty-first century, but the production and distribution of culture generally.


An Unsung Success Story: A Forty-Year Retrospective On U.S. Communications Policy, Christopher S. Yoo 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

An Unsung Success Story: A Forty-Year Retrospective On U.S. Communications Policy, Christopher S. Yoo

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Looking backwards on the occasion of Telecommunications Policy’s fortieth anniversary reveals just how far U.S. communications policy has come. All of the major challenges of 1976, such as promoting competition in customer premises equipment, long distance, and television networking, have largely been overcome. Moreover, new issues that emerged later, such as competition in local telephone service and multichannel video program distribution, have also largely been solved. More often than not, the solution has been the result of structural changes that enhanced facilities-based competition rather than agency-imposed behavioral requirements. Moreover, close inspection reveals that in most cases, prodding by ...


Unmasking The Teen Cyberbully: A First Amendment-Compliant Approach To Protecting Child Victims Of Anonymous, School-Related Internet Harassment, Benjamin A. Holden 2017 The University of Akron

Unmasking The Teen Cyberbully: A First Amendment-Compliant Approach To Protecting Child Victims Of Anonymous, School-Related Internet Harassment, Benjamin A. Holden

Akron Law Review

In proposing a new rule under the First Amendment to adjudicate anonymous Cyberbullying cases, this Article first reviews and summarizes the First Amendment precedents governing regulation of speech by minors and student speech in the school environment. Second, it reviews and discusses the prevalence of minors’ online harassment or Cyberbullying, including pre-litigation disputes reported in the press. Third, it reviews and summarizes the First Amendment precedents governing the “unmasking” of anonymous speakers. Finally, the Cyberbully Unmasking Test is proposed and applied.


Rethinking Ucita: Lessons From The Open Source Movement, Matthew D. Stein 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Rethinking Ucita: Lessons From The Open Source Movement, Matthew D. Stein

Maine Law Review

For those within the information technology (IT) industry, the phrase “open source” has been as prominent at water cooler and boardroom discussions over the last several years as the phrase “out source.” Open source is at once a software development model, a business model, a social movement, and a philosophy that has recently garnered attention from outside of the IT sphere. As such, the topic has become increasingly fertile ground for academic scholarship from several disciplines. Economists, legal academics and practitioners, computer engineers, and social commentators have offered their varying perspectives on open source software. Whether or not this attention ...


New Wine, Old Wineskins: Emerging Issues In Internet-Based Personal Jurisdiction, Jeffrey Hunter Moon, Esq. 2017 St. John's University School of Law

New Wine, Old Wineskins: Emerging Issues In Internet-Based Personal Jurisdiction, Jeffrey Hunter Moon, Esq.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


You Can Run But You Can't Hide: Cell Phone Tracking Data Do Not Receive Fourth Amendment Protection, Merissa Sabol 2017 Southern Methodist University

You Can Run But You Can't Hide: Cell Phone Tracking Data Do Not Receive Fourth Amendment Protection, Merissa Sabol

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


Vmg Salsoul, L.L.C. V. Ciccone: The Ninth Circuit Strikes A Pose, Applying The De Minimis Exception To Music Sampling, Jacob Quinn 2017 Southern Methodist University

Vmg Salsoul, L.L.C. V. Ciccone: The Ninth Circuit Strikes A Pose, Applying The De Minimis Exception To Music Sampling, Jacob Quinn

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


Is Your Roommate A Felon? Considering The Effect Of Criminalizing Password Sharing In Nosal Ii, London Ryyanen England 2017 Southern Methodist University

Is Your Roommate A Felon? Considering The Effect Of Criminalizing Password Sharing In Nosal Ii, London Ryyanen England

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


Lost Esi Under The Federal Rules Of Civil Procedure, Jeffrey A. Parness 2017 Northern Illinois University College of Law

Lost Esi Under The Federal Rules Of Civil Procedure, Jeffrey A. Parness

Science and Technology Law Review

Current Issue

Volume 20, Number 1 – The Privacy, Probability, and Political Pitfalls of Universal DNA Collection

Meghan J. Ryan 20 SMU Sci. & Tech. L. Rev. 3 Watson and Crick’s discovery of the structure of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) in 1953 launched a truth-finding mission not only in science but also in the law. Just thirty years later–after the science had evolved–DNA evidence was being introduced in criminal courts. Today, DNA evidence is heavily relied on in criminal and related cases. It is routinely introduced in murder and rape cases as evidence of guilt; DNA databases have grown as even arrestees have been required to surrender DNA samples; and this evidence has been used to exonerate hundreds of convicted individuals. DNA evidence is generally revered as the “gold standard” in criminal cases because, unlike eyewitness testimony, bite-mark evidence, hair analysis, and the like, it is considered nearly infallible. This potency of DNA evidence has led to suggestions that we, as a nation, should magnify the power of DNA by increasing the size ...


The Wisdom Of Universal Dna Collection: A Reply To Professor Meghan J. Ryan, Arnold Loewy 2017 Texas Tech University School of Law

The Wisdom Of Universal Dna Collection: A Reply To Professor Meghan J. Ryan, Arnold Loewy

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Privacy, Probability, And Political Pitfalls Of Universal Dna Collection, Meghan J. Ryan 2017 Southern Methodist University

The Privacy, Probability, And Political Pitfalls Of Universal Dna Collection, Meghan J. Ryan

Science and Technology Law Review

Watson and Crick’s discovery of the structure of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) in 1953 launched a truth-finding mission not only in science but also in the law. Just thirty years later–after the science had evolved–DNA evidence was being introduced in criminal courts. Today, DNA evidence is heavily relied on in criminal and related cases. It is routinely introduced in murder and rape cases as evidence of guilt; DNA databases have grown as even arrestees have been required to surrender DNA samples; and this evidence has been used to exonerate hundreds of convicted individuals. DNA evidence is generally revered ...


Front Matter, 2017 Southern Methodist University

Front Matter

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Satellite Has No Conscience: §230 In A World Of ‘Alternative Facts’, Laura A. Heymann 2017 William & Mary Law School

The Satellite Has No Conscience: §230 In A World Of ‘Alternative Facts’, Laura A. Heymann

Popular Media

No abstract provided.


Password Please: The Effectiveness Of New York's First-In-Nation Cybersecurity Regulation Of Banks, Melissa Knerr 2017 University of Missouri School of Law

Password Please: The Effectiveness Of New York's First-In-Nation Cybersecurity Regulation Of Banks, Melissa Knerr

The Business, Entrepreneurship & Tax Law Review

In March of 2017, New York enacted new cybersecurity legislation focused on regulating banking security. Cybersecurity attacks on the financial sector have risen recently and the federal and state governments are looking to combat data breaches. The regulations themselves strive to regulate security conduct by the financial institutions, including required testing and risk assessment, training for cybersecurity personnel, and mandated reporting to upperlevel staff as well as the New York Department of Financial Services. While these regulations are the first of their kind and strive to set in place certain basic requirements for cybersecurity, it remains to be seen how ...


Understanding The Consumer Review Fairness Act Of 2016, Eric Goldman 2017 Santa Clara University School of Law

Understanding The Consumer Review Fairness Act Of 2016, Eric Goldman

Michigan Technology Law Review

Consumer reviews are vitally important to our modern economy. Markets become stronger and more efficient when consumers share their marketplace experiences and guide other consumers toward the best vendors and away from poor ones. Businesses recognize the importance of consumer reviews, and many businesses take numerous steps to manage how consumer reviews affect their public image. Unfortunately, in a misguided effort to control consumer reviews, some businesses have deployed contract provisions that ban or inhibit their consumers from reviewing them. I call those provisions “antireview clauses.”

Anti-review clauses distort the marketplace benefits society gets from consumer reviews by suppressing peer ...


Property Rights In Augmented Reality, Declan T. Conroy 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Property Rights In Augmented Reality, Declan T. Conroy

Michigan Technology Law Review

Increasingly, cities, towns, and even rural communities are being slowly reshaped by a dynamic yet initially imperceptible phenomenon: the elaboration of augmented reality. Through applications that place virtual features over specific, real-world locations, layers of augmented reality are proliferating, adding new elements to an increasingly wide range of places. However, while many welcome the sudden appearance of arenas for battling digital creatures in their neighborhood or the chance to write virtual messages on their neighbor’s wall, the areas being augmented oftentimes are privately owned, thereby implicating property rights. Many intrusions, of course, are de minimis: an isolated, invisible Pikachu ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress