Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Internet Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,081 Full-Text Articles 3,297 Authors 2,186,894 Downloads 128 Institutions

All Articles in Internet Law

Faceted Search

4,081 full-text articles. Page 2 of 104.

Lawyers' Abuse Of Technology, Cheryl B. Preston 2018 J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University

Lawyers' Abuse Of Technology, Cheryl B. Preston

Cornell Law Review

Lawyers are highly educated and, allegedly, of higher than average intelligence, but sometimes individual lawyers demonstrate colossal errors in judgment, especially when insufficiently trained in the new and emerging risks involved with the technological age. For instance, although the internet is a necessary tool for attorneys' and is now a prominent feature in the everyday lives of all actors in the legal system, this technology poses particularized and often unanticipated risks of professional and ethical abuse -- risks that are extraordinary both in quantity and intensity. As Harvard's Director of the Center for the Legal Profession warned: We are "only ...


Ethereum And The Sec: Why Most Distributed Autonomous Organizations Are Subject To The Registration Requirements Of The Securities Act Of 1933 And A Proposal For New Regulation, Tiffany L. Minks 2018 Texas A&M University School of Law

Ethereum And The Sec: Why Most Distributed Autonomous Organizations Are Subject To The Registration Requirements Of The Securities Act Of 1933 And A Proposal For New Regulation, Tiffany L. Minks

Texas A&M Law Review

In a world full of new technology, the risk of fraud is constantly increasing. In the securities industry, this risk existed long before the use of technology. Congress enacted the Securities Act of 1933 to combat the risk of fraud and misrepresentation in the sale of securities. By requiring full disclosure, investors have the opportunity to make informed decisions prior to investing. However, Distributed Autonomous Organizations (“DAOs”), through the use of blockchains and smart-contracts, engage in the sale of securities without fully disclosing the risks or complying with the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933. Compliance with the ...


The Face-Off Between Data Privacy And Discovery: Why U.S. Courts Should Respect Eu Data Privacy Law When Considering The Production Of Protected Information, Samantha Cutler 2018 Boston College Law School

The Face-Off Between Data Privacy And Discovery: Why U.S. Courts Should Respect Eu Data Privacy Law When Considering The Production Of Protected Information, Samantha Cutler

Boston College Law Review

When foreign parties involved in U.S. litigation are ordered to produce information that is protected by EU data privacy law, they are caught in an unfortunate “Catch-22.” Historically, U.S. courts have pointed to the unlikelihood of sanctions for data privacy law violations to justify these orders. EU data privacy law, however, has recently undergone several shifts in favor of tougher rules and significantly increased sanctions. Additionally, EU regulators are now more vigilant and active in enforcing these laws. These developments, combined with the benefits of international judicial respect and the intrinsic value of privacy, mean that U.S ...


Industrial Cyber Vulnerabilities: Lessons From Stuxnet And The Internet Of Things, Lawrence J. Trautman, Peter C. Ormerod 2018 Western Carolina University

Industrial Cyber Vulnerabilities: Lessons From Stuxnet And The Internet Of Things, Lawrence J. Trautman, Peter C. Ormerod

University of Miami Law Review

Cyber breaches continue at an alarming pace with new vulnerability warnings an almost daily occurrence. Discovery of the industrial virus Stuxnet during 2010 introduced a global threat of malware focused toward disruption of industrial control devices. By the year 2020, it is estimated that over 30 billion Internet of Things (IoT) devices will exist. The IoT global market spend is estimated to grow from $591.7 billion in 2014 to $1.3 trillion in 2019 with a compound annual growth rate of 17%. The installed base of IoT endpoints will grow from 9.7 billion in 2014 to more than ...


The Struggle To Define Privacy Rights And Liabilities In A Digital World And The Unfortunate Role Of Constitutional Standing, Juan Olano 2018 University of Miami Law School

The Struggle To Define Privacy Rights And Liabilities In A Digital World And The Unfortunate Role Of Constitutional Standing, Juan Olano

University of Miami Law Review

Today’s world runs on data. The creation and improvement of technological products and services depend on the exchange of data between people and companies. As people’s lives become more digitized, companies can collect, store, and analyze more data, and in turn, create better technology. But, because consumer data can be very sensitive (think Social Security numbers, GPS location, fingerprint recognition, etc.) this cyclical exchange comes with serious privacy risks; especially in light of more frequent and sophisticated cyberattacks. This creates a face-off between technological growth and privacy rights. While it makes sense that people should be willing to ...


The Court Must Play Its Interpretative Role: Defending The Defend Trade Secrets Act’S Extraterritorial Reach, Jada M. Colon 2018 University of Cincinnati College of Law

The Court Must Play Its Interpretative Role: Defending The Defend Trade Secrets Act’S Extraterritorial Reach, Jada M. Colon

The University of Cincinnati Intellectual Property and Computer Law Journal

The exact reach of the Defend Trade Secrets Act’s extraterritoriality provision has yet to be interpreted by the courts. If United States securities, trademark, and antitrust law serves as any indication of what is to be expected, the Defend Trade Secrets Act may be subject to an inconsistent array of interpretation. When faced with interpreting the extraterritorial scope of the Defend Trade Secrets Act for the first time, the court must set a strong precedent by enacting a single, uniform effects test that will not falter when applied in different circumstances and by different circuits. Courts interpreting United States ...


The Google Dilemma, James Grimmelmann 2018 University of Maryland - Baltimore

The Google Dilemma, James Grimmelmann

James Grimmelmann

No abstract provided.


Jurisdiction, The Internet, And The Good Faith Exception: Controversy Over The Government’S Use Of Network Investigative Techniques, Maureen Weidman 2018 Penn State Dickinson Law

Jurisdiction, The Internet, And The Good Faith Exception: Controversy Over The Government’S Use Of Network Investigative Techniques, Maureen Weidman

Dickinson Law Review

In February 2015, the FBI discovered a website dedicated to child pornography located on the Tor Network, a network designed to protect its users’ identities on the Internet. Due to the structure of the Tor Network, the FBI could not take down the website and identify users who previously accessed the website. Instead, the FBI kept the website operational for 30 days and applied for a search warrant in the Eastern District of Virginia to use a device called a Network Investigative Technique (“NIT”). This device operated similarly to malware and “attached” to computers accessing the website, allowing the government ...


Pii In Context: Video Privacy And A Factor-Based Test For Assessing Personal Information, Daniel L. Macioce Jr. 2018 Pepperdine University

Pii In Context: Video Privacy And A Factor-Based Test For Assessing Personal Information, Daniel L. Macioce Jr.

Pepperdine Law Review

As a central concept in American information privacy law, personally identifiable information (PII) plays a critical role in determining whether a privacy violation has occurred. Under the Video Privacy Protection Act of 1988 (VPPA), PII “includes information which identifies a person as having requested or obtained specific video materials or services.” Despite the clarity that these words may have when the Statute was enacted, the line separating PII from non-PII in the context of streaming video is not easily drawn, in part due to the prevalence of behavior tracking technologies and the emergence of “big data” analytics. The First Circuit ...


Mapping Legalzoom's Disruptive Innovation, Matthew T. Ciulla 2018 Pepperdine University

Mapping Legalzoom's Disruptive Innovation, Matthew T. Ciulla

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

No abstract provided.


The Rise Of Artificial Intelligence In The Legal Field: Where We Are And Where We Are Going, Sergio David Becerra 2018 Pepperdine University

The Rise Of Artificial Intelligence In The Legal Field: Where We Are And Where We Are Going, Sergio David Becerra

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

The twenty-first century has brought significant technological advancement that permeates all aspects of our lives. The legal field, though slow in the adaption of this technology, is beginning to pick up the pace. Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is used now to perform legal work once completed solely by legal practitioners. This Comment outlines what AI is and reviews the current use of AI in the legal field. It also identifies AI products and developments that are in place. Finally, it argues that lawyers will always be needed in the practice of law, despite the continued growth of AI.


These Walls Can Talk! Securing Digital Privacy In The Smart Home Under The Fourth Amendment, Stefan Ducich 2018 Duke Law

These Walls Can Talk! Securing Digital Privacy In The Smart Home Under The Fourth Amendment, Stefan Ducich

Duke Law & Technology Review

Privacy law in the United States has not kept pace with the realities of technological development, nor the growing reliance on the Internet of Things (IoT). As of now, the law has not adequately secured the “smart” home from intrusion by the state, and the Supreme Court further eroded digital privacy by conflating the common law concepts of trespass and exclusion in United States v. Jones. This article argues that the Court must correct this misstep by explicitly recognizing the method by which the Founding Fathers sought to “secure” houses and effects under the Fourth Amendment. Namely, the Court must ...


Technological Opacity & Procedural Injustice, Seth Katsuya Endo 2018 NYU School of Law

Technological Opacity & Procedural Injustice, Seth Katsuya Endo

Boston College Law Review

From Google’s auto-correction of spelling errors to Netflix’s movie suggestions, machine-learning systems are a part of our everyday life. Both private and state actors increasingly employ such systems to make decisions that implicate individuals’ substantive rights, such as with credit scoring, government-benefit eligibility decisions, national security screening, and criminal sentencing. In turn, the rising use of machine-learning systems has led to questioning about whether they are sufficiently accurate, fair, and transparent. This Article builds on that work, focusing on how opaque technologies can subtly erode the due process norm of participation. To illuminate this issue, this Article examines ...


Writing The Access Code: Enforcing Commercial Web Accessibility Without Regulations Under Title Iii Of The Americans With Disabilities Act, Daniel Sorger 2018 Boston College Law School

Writing The Access Code: Enforcing Commercial Web Accessibility Without Regulations Under Title Iii Of The Americans With Disabilities Act, Daniel Sorger

Boston College Law Review

A growing number of private lawsuits allege that businesses are violating Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act because their websites are inaccessible to disabled individuals. Courts remain divided, however, on the extent to which commercial websites are covered under Title III. Additionally, the Department of Justice has not promulgated commercial web accessibility regulations—adding further uncertainty to the private enforcement regime. This Note argues that Title III broadly covers commercial websites, but that private enforcement is not positioned to spur lasting, broad-based Title III compliance. It proposes that large-scale litigation, state attorney general action, and state laws should ...


The Song Remains The Same: What Cyberlaw Might Teach The Next Internet Economy, Kevin Werbach 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

The Song Remains The Same: What Cyberlaw Might Teach The Next Internet Economy, Kevin Werbach

Florida Law Review

The next stage of the digital economy will involve trillions of networked devices across every industry and sphere of human activity: The Internet of the World. Early manifestations of this evolution through on-demand services such as Uber and Airbnb raise a host of serious legal questions. The stage seems set for a decisive battle between regulation and innovation. Yet this perception is mistaken. In the end, the emerging businesses will welcome government engagement, and regulatory actors will accept creative solutions to achieve their goals. Why expect such a resolution? Because the same story played out twenty years ago, in the ...


Regulating Data As Property: A New Construct For Moving Forward, Jeffrey Ritter, Anna Mayer 2018 Duke Law

Regulating Data As Property: A New Construct For Moving Forward, Jeffrey Ritter, Anna Mayer

Duke Law & Technology Review

The global community urgently needs precise, clear rules that define ownership of data and express the attendant rights to license, transfer, use, modify, and destroy digital information assets. In response, this article proposes a new approach for regulating data as an entirely new class of property. Recently, European and Asian public officials and industries have called for data ownership principles to be developed, above and beyond current privacy and data protection laws. In addition, official policy guidances and legal proposals have been published that offer to accelerate realization of a property rights structure for digital information. But how can ownership ...


Extremist Speech, Compelled Conformity, And Censorship Creep, Danielle Keats Citron 2018 University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

Extremist Speech, Compelled Conformity, And Censorship Creep, Danielle Keats Citron

Notre Dame Law Review

Silicon Valley has long been viewed as a full-throated champion of First Amendment values. The dominant online platforms, however, have recently adopted speech policies and processes that depart from the U.S. model. In an agreement with the European Commission, the dominant tech companies have pledged to respond to reports of hate speech within twenty-four hours, a hasty process that may trade valuable expression for speedy results. Plans have been announced for an industry database that will allow the same companies to share hashed images of banned extremist content for review and removal elsewhere. These changes are less the result ...


Minimum Virtual Contacts: A Framework For Specific Jurisdiction In Cyberspace, Adam R. Kleven 2018 University of Michigan Law School

Minimum Virtual Contacts: A Framework For Specific Jurisdiction In Cyberspace, Adam R. Kleven

Michigan Law Review

As the ubiquity and importance of the internet continue to grow, courts will address more cases involving online activity. In doing so, courts will confront the threshold issue of whether a defendant can be subject to specific personal jurisdiction. The Supreme Court, however, has yet to speak to this internet-jurisdiction issue. Current precedent, when strictly applied to the internet, yields fundamentally unfair results when addressing specific jurisdiction. To better achieve the fairness aim of due process, this must change. This Note argues that, in internet tort cases, the “express aiming” requirement should be discarded from the jurisdictional analysis and that ...


International Cybertorts: Expanding State Accountability In Cyberspace, Rebecca Crootof 2018 Yale Law School

International Cybertorts: Expanding State Accountability In Cyberspace, Rebecca Crootof

Cornell Law Review

States are not being held accountable for the vast majority of their harmful cyberoperations, largely because classifications created in physical space do not map well onto the cyber domain. Most injurious and invasive cyberoperations are not cybercrimes and do not constitute cyberwarfare, nor are states extending existing definitions of wrongful acts permitting countermeasures to cyberoperations (possibly to avoid creating precedent restricting their own activities). Absent an appropriate label, victim states have few effective and nonescalatory responsive options, and the harms associated with these incidents lie where they fall.

This Article draws on tort law and international law principles to construct ...


Commodifying Consumer Data In The Era Of The Internet Of Things, Stacy-Ann Elvy 2018 New York Law School

Commodifying Consumer Data In The Era Of The Internet Of Things, Stacy-Ann Elvy

Boston College Law Review

Internet of Things (“IoT”) products generate a wealth of data about consumers that was never before widely and easily accessible to companies. Examples include biometric and health-related data, such as fingerprint patterns, heart rates, and calories burned. This Article explores the connection between the types of data generated by the IoT and the financial frameworks of Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and the Bankruptcy Code. It critiques these regimes, which enable the commodification of consumer data, as well as laws aimed at protecting consumer data, such as the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act, various state biometric ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress