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Intellectual Property Law Commons

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Lost Esi Under The Federal Rules Of Civil Procedure, Jeffrey A. Parness 2017 Northern Illinois University College of Law

Lost Esi Under The Federal Rules Of Civil Procedure, Jeffrey A. Parness

Science and Technology Law Review

Current Issue

Volume 20, Number 1 – The Privacy, Probability, and Political Pitfalls of Universal DNA Collection

Meghan J. Ryan 20 SMU Sci. & Tech. L. Rev. 3 Watson and Crick’s discovery of the structure of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) in 1953 launched a truth-finding mission not only in science but also in the law. Just thirty years later–after the science had evolved–DNA evidence was being introduced in criminal courts. Today, DNA evidence is heavily relied on in criminal and related cases. It is routinely introduced in murder and rape cases as evidence of guilt; DNA databases have grown as even arrestees have been required to surrender DNA samples; and this evidence has been used to exonerate hundreds of convicted individuals. DNA evidence is generally revered as the “gold standard” in criminal cases because, unlike eyewitness testimony, bite-mark evidence, hair analysis, and the like, it is considered nearly infallible. This potency of DNA evidence has led to suggestions that we, as a nation, should magnify the power of DNA by increasing the size ...


The Wisdom Of Universal Dna Collection: A Reply To Professor Meghan J. Ryan, Arnold Loewy 2017 Texas Tech University School of Law

The Wisdom Of Universal Dna Collection: A Reply To Professor Meghan J. Ryan, Arnold Loewy

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Privacy, Probability, And Political Pitfalls Of Universal Dna Collection, Meghan J. Ryan 2017 Southern Methodist University

The Privacy, Probability, And Political Pitfalls Of Universal Dna Collection, Meghan J. Ryan

Science and Technology Law Review

Watson and Crick’s discovery of the structure of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) in 1953 launched a truth-finding mission not only in science but also in the law. Just thirty years later–after the science had evolved–DNA evidence was being introduced in criminal courts. Today, DNA evidence is heavily relied on in criminal and related cases. It is routinely introduced in murder and rape cases as evidence of guilt; DNA databases have grown as even arrestees have been required to surrender DNA samples; and this evidence has been used to exonerate hundreds of convicted individuals. DNA evidence is generally revered ...


Front Matter, 2017 Southern Methodist University

Front Matter

Science and Technology Law Review

No abstract provided.


Fair Dealing On Trial, Lisa Di Valentino 2017 University of Massachusetts Amherst

Fair Dealing On Trial, Lisa Di Valentino

Lisa Di Valentino

Discusses and critiques Access Copyright v. York University, 2017 FC 669, a Federal Court of Canada decision that addresses fair dealing policy and practice at a major university.


Common Copyright Calamities, G. Franklin Rothwell, Esq. 2017 St. John's University School of Law

Common Copyright Calamities, G. Franklin Rothwell, Esq.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


At&T V. Microsoft: Is This A Case Of Deepsouth Déjà Vu?, Christopher R. Rogers 2017 University of Maine School of Law

At&T V. Microsoft: Is This A Case Of Deepsouth Déjà Vu?, Christopher R. Rogers

Maine Law Review

It has been stated many times by various courts that the patent laws of the United States do not reach beyond the borders of the United States. In an age of expanding world commerce, the territorial reach of our patent laws has sometimes made it difficult for U.S. inventors to meaningfully protect their intellectual property. For example, the Supreme Court holding in Deepsouth Packing Co. v. Laitram Corp. opened up a loophole that allowed unlicensed U.S. manufacturers to essentially export patented inventions, thereby trampling on the patent rights of U.S. patent holders selling to foreign markets. The ...


Assigning Infringement Claims: Silvers V. Sony Pictures, Heather B. Sanborn 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Assigning Infringement Claims: Silvers V. Sony Pictures, Heather B. Sanborn

Maine Law Review

The Copyright Act establishes protection for original, creative works of authorship as a means of providing ex ante incentives for creativity. But how real is that protection? Imagine that you have written a script and managed to have your play produced in a local community theater. A few years later, you find that a major Hollywood studio has taken your script, adapted it slightly, and made it into the next summer blockbuster, raking in millions without ever obtaining a license from you. Of course, you can sue them for infringement. But how much will that litigation cost and what are ...


Rembrandts In The Research Lab: Why Universities Should Take A Lesson From Big Business To Increase Innovation, Kristen Osenga 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Rembrandts In The Research Lab: Why Universities Should Take A Lesson From Big Business To Increase Innovation, Kristen Osenga

Maine Law Review

Universities are typically considered to have two complementary goals: providing education and performing research. While the determination of which objective deserves primacy has long been debated and is not within the scope of this paper, it is indisputable that productive research serves to further a university's goal of education, both directly by adding to the body of knowledge to be dispensed to the students and indirectly by increasing the university's prestige, thereby attracting lucrative grants, quality students, and competitive faculty members to the university. It is, at the very least, safe to say that research is the heart ...


Open Source Approaches In Biotechnology: Utopia Revisited, Yann Joly 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Open Source Approaches In Biotechnology: Utopia Revisited, Yann Joly

Maine Law Review

Tracing its origin to Greek antiquity, intellectual property has become an institution in modern legal systems worldwide. This growing importance of intellectual property was confirmed with the 1994 adoption of the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement by the World Trade Organization (WTO), which harmonized the rules of intellectual property amongst the various members of the international community on the model of developed countries. However enshrined in the legal tradition, intellectual property law has also had its share of detractors and has recently come under severe criticism. The exercise of intellectual property rights in such diverse fields of creation ...


Road Map To Revolution? Patent-Based Open Science, Lee Petherbridge 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Road Map To Revolution? Patent-Based Open Science, Lee Petherbridge

Maine Law Review

The contemporary approach to innovation in the life sciences relies on a patent-based proprietary model. Limitations on patent rights and business concerns often focus innovation to markets where the near-term monetary rewards are highest. This is “efficient” under an austere understanding of the term, but the proprietary model can be problematic from a practical perspective because it may not focus innovation to certain deserving markets. This Article contends that the property rights conferred by patent law may still serve as a positive base for innovation directed to underserved markets. The comparatively strong rights conferred by patent law provide upstream or ...


A Virtue-Centered Approach To The Biotechnology Commons (Or, The Virtuous Penguin), David W. Opderbeck 2017 University of Maine School of Law

A Virtue-Centered Approach To The Biotechnology Commons (Or, The Virtuous Penguin), David W. Opderbeck

Maine Law Review

The instrumentalist emphasis of the current biotechnology intellectual property rights (IPR) debate is not surprising. In the American tradition, intellectual property law has long been justified primarily by instrumentalist concerns. Thomas Jefferson famously acceded to the “embarrassment of patent and copyright monopolies because he believed a limited monopoly would encourage the production of new scholarship and inventions. The framers' willingness to allow this embarrassment for the greater good is enshrined in the Intellectual Property Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Countless judicial opinions refer to intellectual property law as a tool that provides necessary incentives to creators and innovators. Intellectual ...


The Experimental Use Exception To Patent Infringement: Do Universities Deserve Special Treatment?, Elizabeth A. Rowe 2017 University of Maine School of Law

The Experimental Use Exception To Patent Infringement: Do Universities Deserve Special Treatment?, Elizabeth A. Rowe

Maine Law Review

Inventor Ivan owns a patent on a new Gizmo. He has spent a substantial portion of his time and resources to develop the Gizmo. He has also spent thousands of dollars on his patent attorneys to obtain the patent. Ivan had to wait over two years for the patent application to be processed and approved. But it was all worth it. Our patent laws grant Ivan a negative right-the right to exclude others from practicing his invention during the period of the patent. The local university is using Ivan's invention to further its own research. The university's research ...


Adoption Of The Bayh-Dolye Act In Developed Countries: Added Presure For A Broad Research Exemption In The United States?, Michael S. Mireles 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Adoption Of The Bayh-Dolye Act In Developed Countries: Added Presure For A Broad Research Exemption In The United States?, Michael S. Mireles

Maine Law Review

Numerous developed countries, most if not all members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), including Japan, France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Austria, Denmark, Norway, Portugal, Spain, and Finland, have or are considering adopting legislation similar to the Bayh-Dole Act. These countries apparently believe that passage of legislation similar to the Bayh-Dole Act will lead to the transfer of government funded research results from the university laboratory to the marketplace and other economic activity. In the United States, the birthplace of the Bayh-Dole Act (the Act), it is not entirely clear whether its passage is the direct result ...


Ip Law Book Review, V. 8#1, William T. Gallagher 2017 Golden Gate University School of Law

Ip Law Book Review, V. 8#1, William T. Gallagher

Intellectual Property Law

AUTHORS IN COURT: SCENES FROM THE THEATER OF COPYRIGHT, by Mark Rose. Reviewed by Robert Spoo, The University of Tulsa College of Law

COPYRIGHT BEYOND LAW: REGULATING CREATIVITY IN THE GRAFFITI SUBCULTURE, by Marta Iljadica. Reviewed by Zahr K. Said, University of Washington School of Law

CHOREOGRAPHING COPYRIGHT: RACE, GENDER, AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN AMERICAN DANCE by Anthea Kraut. Reviewed by Carys Craig, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University


Spec Kit 357 Libraries, Presses, And Publishing November 2017, Laurie N. Taylor, Brian W. Keith, Chelsea Dinsmore, Meredith Morris-Babb 2017 University of Florida

Spec Kit 357 Libraries, Presses, And Publishing November 2017, Laurie N. Taylor, Brian W. Keith, Chelsea Dinsmore, Meredith Morris-Babb

Copyright, Fair Use, Scholarly Communication, etc.

Many Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members have robust and long-standing publishing activities, often in collaboration with or running parallel to the press of the larger institutional entity. As reported in the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) 2015–2016 annual report, 30 AAUP member presses are in libraries. Eighty-one institutions are both ARL and AAUP members, and at 21 of those institutions, the press reports to the library. Other libraries—including Amherst College Press and the University of Cincinnati Press—launched new presses within libraries. Most of the 123 ARL member libraries are engaged in publishing or publishing support ...


Connect The Dots: Patents And Interdisciplinarity, Michal Shur-Ofry 2017 Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Connect The Dots: Patents And Interdisciplinarity, Michal Shur-Ofry

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This Article unravels a troubling paradox in the ecosystem of innovation. Interdisciplinarity is widely recognized as a source of valuable innovation and a trigger for technological breakthroughs. Yet, patent law, a principal legal tool for promoting innovation, fails to acknowledge it in an explicit, consistent manner. Moreover, although the scientific understanding of the significance of interdisciplinarity for innovation increasingly relies on big data analyses of patent databases, patent law practically ignores patent data as a source of information about interdisciplinary innovation. This Article argues that patent law should connect the dots—explicitly recognize interdisciplinarity as a positive indication when deciding ...


Understanding Nautilus's Reasonable-Certainty Standard: Requirements For Linguistic And Physical Definiteness Of Patent Claims, Gary M. Fox 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Understanding Nautilus's Reasonable-Certainty Standard: Requirements For Linguistic And Physical Definiteness Of Patent Claims, Gary M. Fox

Michigan Law Review

Patent applicants must satisfy a variety of requirements to obtain a patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The definiteness requirement forces applicants to describe their inventions in unambiguous terms so that other inventors will understand the scope of granted patent rights. Although the statutory provision for the definiteness requirement has been stable for many years, the Supreme Court’s decision in Nautilus v. Biosig Instruments altered the doctrine. The Court abrogated the Federal Circuit’s insoluble-ambiguity standard and replaced it with a new reasonable-certainty standard. Various district courts have applied the new standard in different ways ...


Paypal Is New Money: Extending Secondary Copyright Liability Safe Harbors To Online Payment Processors, Erika Douglas 2017 University of Michigan Law School

Paypal Is New Money: Extending Secondary Copyright Liability Safe Harbors To Online Payment Processors, Erika Douglas

Michigan Telecommunications and Technology Law Review

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) has shaped the Internet as we know it. This legislation shields online service providers from secondary copyright infringement liability in exchange for takedown of infringing content of their users. Yet online payment processors, the backbone of $300 billion in U.S. e-commerce, are completely outside of the DMCA’s protection. This Article uses PayPal, the most popular online payment company in the U.S., to illustrate the growing risk of secondary liability for payment processors. First it looks at jurisprudence that expands secondary copyright liability online, and explains how it might be applied to ...


“You Must Construct Additional Pylons”: Building A Better Framework For Esports Governance, Laura L. Chao 2017 Fordham University School of Law

“You Must Construct Additional Pylons”: Building A Better Framework For Esports Governance, Laura L. Chao

Fordham Law Review

The popularity of “esports,” also known as “electronic sports” or competitive video gaming, has exploded in recent years and captured the attention of cord-cutting millennials—often to the detriment of sports such as basketball, football, baseball, and hockey. In the United States, the commercial dominance of such traditional sports stems from decades of regulatory support. Consequently, while esports regulation is likely to emulate many aspects of traditional sports governance, the esports industry is fraught with challenges that inhibit sophisticated ownership and capital investment. Domestic regulation is complicated by underlying intellectual property ownership and ancillary considerations such as fluctuations in a ...


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