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Masthead, 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Masthead

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Are College Football Players Being Promised Big Nfl Bucks And Being Shortchanged In The Classroom And On The Field?, Melanie Navarro 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Are College Football Players Being Promised Big Nfl Bucks And Being Shortchanged In The Classroom And On The Field?, Melanie Navarro

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

Football is America’s pastime. Over one hundred million people tuned in to watch this year’s Super Bowl. Sundays during football season are spent in front of a television rooting for our favorite teams. Football has been an integral part of American culture for over 120 years. But in recent years, football has lost yardage. Information regarding the causal link between head injuries on the football field and degenerative brain diseases has come to light. Thousands of former National Football League (“NFL”) players took part in a highly publicized class-action lawsuit against the league. Players alleged that the NFL ...


Corruption And College Sports: A Love Story, Andrea Cristiani Closa 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Corruption And College Sports: A Love Story, Andrea Cristiani Closa

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

College sports are a staple of American tradition, bringing in hundreds of millions of viewers each year. Fans from all over the country root for their team’s success and hope they will be the ones to take home the national championship each year. Increasingly, however, college sports have been in the public eye for a very different reason: corruption. The National Collegiate Athletics Association’s (“NCAA”) Amateurism Rule, which prohibits student-athletes from receiving compensation, has contributed to this ongoing corruption. The NCAA insists upon its student-athletes remaining amateurs, even though its own rule is damaging the integrity of college ...


Enemy Of The People: The Ghost Of The F.C.C. Fairness Doctrine In The Age Of Alternative Facts, Ian Klein 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Enemy Of The People: The Ghost Of The F.C.C. Fairness Doctrine In The Age Of Alternative Facts, Ian Klein

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

The FCC Fairness Doctrine required that all major broadcasting outlets spend equal time covering both sides of all controversial issues of national importance. The Fairness Doctrine remained the standard for decades before it stopped being enforced during the Reagan administration, and was removed from the Federal Register during the Obama administration. Since the Fairness Doctrine’s disappearance, the perception by conservatives and progressives alike has been that major media outlets display overt biases towards one political affiliation or the other. As it becomes harder to determine real news from “fake news,” Americans’ trust in media is at an all-time low ...


Forum Delegation: The Birth And Transposition Of A New Approach To Public Forum Doctrine, Brett Johnson, Shane C. Epping 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Forum Delegation: The Birth And Transposition Of A New Approach To Public Forum Doctrine, Brett Johnson, Shane C. Epping

Hastings Communications and Entertainment Law Journal

This paper introduces and explores the concept of forum delegation: the power of government officials to suggest which forums to allow speakers to use. The concept is born out of a recent legal battle between the University of Minnesota and conservative speaker Ben Shapiro, in which the UMN required Shapiro to speak in a venue away from the heart of campus due to concerns over the school’s ability to provide adequate security for the event. The paper first analyzes the UMN case to assess the constitutionality of forum delegation in the context of regulating speech and public universities. Next ...


The Flavor Of Open Access Over Rice: Tech Transforms & Transmutes Ed, Rachel S. Evans 2019 University of Georgia School of Law

The Flavor Of Open Access Over Rice: Tech Transforms & Transmutes Ed, Rachel S. Evans

Articles, Chapters and Online Publications

Rachel Evans crafts a short history of Open Educational Resources and provides a list of tools and other sites for exploring and creating Open Access Textbooks and other materials. The post also recounts a recent Open Access event at UGA Law Library and compares the perils of generationally divided views on access to quality yet affordable education to the clash of tradition and modernity in a particular film The Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice. To close the piece she encourages members to participate in the recently shared ALL-SIS (Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section) survey about Open Educational Resources ...


Reaching Through The “Ghost Doxer:” An Argument For Imposing Secondary Liability On Online Intermediaries, Natalia Homchick 2019 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Reaching Through The “Ghost Doxer:” An Argument For Imposing Secondary Liability On Online Intermediaries, Natalia Homchick

Washington and Lee Law Review

Imagine you have decided to run for office, to speak out publicly against an injustice, to enter the job market, or even to join a new online forum. Now, imagine after starting your chosen endeavor, you go online to discover that someone who disagrees with your position posted your personal information on the internet and called for others to harass you. To make matters worse, you realize that you cannot determine who posted your personal data. You have been doxed. Because you cannot identify the person who posted your information, where can you turn for recourse? The next logical party ...


Left With No Name: How Government Action In Intra-Church Trademark Disputes Violates The Free Exercise Clause Of The First Amendment, Mary Kate Nicholson 2019 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Left With No Name: How Government Action In Intra-Church Trademark Disputes Violates The Free Exercise Clause Of The First Amendment, Mary Kate Nicholson

Washington and Lee Law Review

The United States was founded in part on the principle of freedom of religion, where citizens were free to practice any religion. The founding fathers felt so strongly about this principle that it was incorporated into the First Amendment. The Free Exercise Clause states that “Congress shall make no law . . . prohibiting the free exercise thereof . . . .” The Supreme Court later adopted the neutral principles approach to avoid Free Exercise violations resulting from courts deciding real property disputes. Without the application of the same neutral principles to intellectual property disputes between churches, however, there is real danger of violating the Free Exercise ...


International Legal Protection Of Trademarks In China, Robert H. Hu 2019 St. Mary’s University School of Law, San Antonio, Texas

International Legal Protection Of Trademarks In China, Robert H. Hu

Robert Hu

In China, the concept of intellectual property is relatively new. Chinese officials began taking steps towards trademark regulations in the 1950s, but it was not until 1982 that the first Chinese Trademark Law was enacted. Today, because of the growing global economy, China has had the highest number of trademark requests in the world for the fifth year in a row. In response to domestic and international pressures, Chinese trademark law and courts have had to adapt to the ever-changing landscape. This article first examines the development of Chinese intellectual property law through the international trademark agreements where China is ...


International Copyright In Historical Context: Who Are The Real Pirates?, Paul G. St-Pierre 2019 University of Guelph

International Copyright In Historical Context: Who Are The Real Pirates?, Paul G. St-Pierre

Charleston Library Conference

Copyright is usually justified with arguments about defending the natural right of authors to control their creations, or claims that limited monopolies spur innovation for the greater good of society. I contrarily assert that the primary intent of copyright has generally been to protect powerful industries in advanced countries and ensure control over emerging markets that rely on the importation of intellectual property.

As global trade expanded in the 19th century, a patchwork quilt of domestic copyright laws and bilateral treaties failed to stem rampant infringement that hurt publishers’ export revenues. Re-printers and readers, however, benefited from lower prices. The ...


Libraries, Authors, And Literary Estates: The Complex Case Of Rosenbach V. Sendak (2016), Patrick Roughen 2019 North Carolina Central University

Libraries, Authors, And Literary Estates: The Complex Case Of Rosenbach V. Sendak (2016), Patrick Roughen

Charleston Library Conference

This research examines a lawsuit filed by the Rosenbach Museum and Library of Philadelphia in 2016 against the Estate of Maurice Sendak (1928–2012) to determine the distribution of some of Sendak’s collection of rare books. In the lawsuit, the Rosenbach claimed the executors of the Sendak estate had withheld a portion of the rare books to which it was entitled under Sendak’s will. This paper suggests possible ways in which institutions such as libraries, archives, and museums might anticipate and address some of the ownership-related problems that arise during the acquisition and/or loss of collections of ...


18th Annual Recent Developments In Ip Law And Policy Conference, Golden Gate University School of Law 2019 Golden Gate University School of Law

18th Annual Recent Developments In Ip Law And Policy Conference, Golden Gate University School Of Law

Intellectual Property Law

Welcome to the 18th Annual Conference on Recent Developments in Intellectual Property Law and Policy, presented by the Center for Intellectual Property and Privacy Law (CIPPL) of Golden Gate University School of Law. This annual tradition, begun in late September 2001, was one of the first events developed as part of the foundation of our new IP Law Program. Over the years we have hosted presentations by leading thinkers in the area of IP Law, including Professor & former Senior Advisor to the Obama Administration Justin Hughes, New Yorker writer Ken Auletta, Professor Dan Burk, Professor Susan Scafidi of the Fashion ...


Copyrighting Experiences: How Copyright Law Applies To Virtual Reality Programs, Alexis Dunne 2019 Pepperdine University

Copyrighting Experiences: How Copyright Law Applies To Virtual Reality Programs, Alexis Dunne

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

This note will attempt to shed light on the question of what kind of protection copyright law affords VR experiences. Part II discusses the nature of VR experiences and their implementation through specifically tailored VR technology. Part III provides an overview of copyright protection, its limitations, and specifically the history of the copyrightability of computer programs. Parts IV and V outline case law relevant to the discussion of the copyrightability of different types of VR experiences and how that case law similarly or dissimilarly apply to the protection of VR experiences. Part IV focuses on protecting VR experiences as a ...


Government-Sponsored Patent Monetizing Entities, Garry A. Gabison 2019 Pepperdine University

Government-Sponsored Patent Monetizing Entities, Garry A. Gabison

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

Government-sponsored patent assertion entities have materialized all over the world. This article looks at the market failure associated with the patent system. These entities have an opportunity to address these market inefficiencies. But, these entities can damage the innovation more by decreasing competition and increasing protectionism. This article looks at three such entities and argues that the US could use such an entity.


Making Room For Big Data: Web Scraping And An Affirmative Right To Access Publicly Available Information Online, Amber Zamora 2019 Pepperdine University

Making Room For Big Data: Web Scraping And An Affirmative Right To Access Publicly Available Information Online, Amber Zamora

The Journal of Business, Entrepreneurship & the Law

This paper will explore the legality of web scraping through the lens of recent litigation between web scraper hiQ Labs and the online professional networking platform, LinkedIn. First, the paper will study the background of web scraping litigation, some challenges courts face in issuing consistent verdicts, and the most common claims companies make against web scrapers. Then the paper will address three of the most common claims and identify court motivations and limitations within the doctrines. The first claims are those arising from the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). Next, the paper will investigate copyright claims and defenses ...


Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Leslie A. Street, David R. Hansen, Kyle K. Courtney 2019 William & Mary Law School

Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Leslie A. Street, David R. Hansen, Kyle K. Courtney

Leslie A. Street

No abstract provided.


Cable, Copyright, Communications: Controversy, Lee Fisher, Sam Salah 2019 Selected Works

Cable, Copyright, Communications: Controversy, Lee Fisher, Sam Salah

Lee Fisher

This Note will examine the efforts of the courts, the legislature, and the Federal Communications Com-mission (FCC) to apply the Copyright Act of 1909 to the technological developments of the twentieth century. It is submitted that the significance of Teleprompter lies not in the Court's determination that there was no copyright infringement -for that finding will soon be negated by upcoming copyright law revision -but in the inability of the Court to discard past inflexible and unrealistic approaches to the 1909 Copyright Act. Offered is a different method of viewing cable communications in terms of the Copyright Act, which ...


Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Georgia V. Public.Resource.Org, Inc., No. 18-1150 (U.S. Oct. 16, 2019), Michelle M. Wu 2019 Georgetown University Law Center

Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Georgia V. Public.Resource.Org, Inc., No. 18-1150 (U.S. Oct. 16, 2019), Michelle M. Wu

U.S. Supreme Court Briefs

Due process and the rule of law require that the public has meaningful access to “the law.” Every major modern society since the Greeks has recognized the importance of this principle. Roscoe Pound, Theories of the Law, 22 Yale L.J. 114, 117 (1912).

In the United States, “the law” largely comes from appellate courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies who have been granted rule-making authority. As every first year law student learns, those law-making bodies have developed highly specific methods for communicating their pronouncements of law through official publications, such as the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (“OCGA”).

Those specific ...


Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Leslie A. Street, David R. Hansen, Kyle K. Courtney 2019 William & Mary Law School

Brief Of Amici Curiae 116 Law Librarians And 5 Law Library Organizations In Support Of Respondent, Leslie A. Street, David R. Hansen, Kyle K. Courtney

Appellate Briefs

No abstract provided.


The Uncopyrightability Of Edicts Of Government, Shyamkrishna Balganesh, Peter S. Menell 2019 University of Pennsylvania Law School

The Uncopyrightability Of Edicts Of Government, Shyamkrishna Balganesh, Peter S. Menell

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This amicus brief filed in the Supreme Court appeal of Georgia, et al., v. Public.Resource.Org.,explores the interplay of copyright law and the edicts of government doctrine. The “edicts of government” doctrine was first validated by the U.S. Supreme Court in a series of nineteenth century cases. Wheaton v. Peters, 33 U.S. (8 Pet.) 591 (1834); Banks v. Manchester, 128 U.S. 244 (1888); Callaghan v. Meyers, 128 U.S. 617 (1888). While the doctrine has never been directly recognized in the express wording of the copyright statute, it is nevertheless firmly rooted in foundational copyright ...


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