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Investor-State Dispute Settlement: Human Rights And Regulatory Lessons From "Lilly V. Canada", Daniel J. Gervais 2019 Selected Works

Investor-State Dispute Settlement: Human Rights And Regulatory Lessons From "Lilly V. Canada", Daniel J. Gervais

Daniel J Gervais

The triangular interface between trade, intellectual property (IP) and human rights has yet to be fully formed, both doctrinally and normatively. Adding investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) to the mix increases the complexity of the equations to solve. Two resultant issues are explored in this Article. First, the Article considers ways in which broader public policy objectives—in particular the protection of human rights—can and should be factored into determinations of whether a state’s action is compatible with its trade obligations and commitments in the state-to-state dispute settlement context. Second, the Article examines whether doctrinal tools used in state-to-state ...


Classic Star Wars Patents Coloring Book, Paulina Borrego 2019 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Classic Star Wars Patents Coloring Book, Paulina Borrego

Paulina Borrego

Coloring book containing a selected page from twelve different U.S. design patents pertaining to the Star Wars movie.


Creatures Of Star Wars Patents Coloring Book, Paulina Borrego 2019 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Creatures Of Star Wars Patents Coloring Book, Paulina Borrego

Paulina Borrego

Coloring book containing a selected page from twelve different U.S. design patents pertaining to the theme of creatures from the Star Wars movie.


Tried And True: Fair Use Tales For The Telling, Sarah E. McCleskey, Courtney L. Selby 2019 Hofstra University

Tried And True: Fair Use Tales For The Telling, Sarah E. Mccleskey, Courtney L. Selby

Hofstra Law Faculty Scholarship

On Thursday, March 1, 2018, the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication hosted “Tried and True: Fair Use Tales for the Telling,” a one-day program celebrating Harvard’s Fifth Anniversary of Fair Use Week. Leading fair use scholars and practitioners shared their stories and engaged in lively discussion about the powerful and flexible fair use provision of the Copyright Act and its applications. Topics included treatment of the fair use doctrine in recent jurisprudence, conflicts over the use of visual works in remixes and mash-ups, academic work and social commentary, filmmaking, controlled digital lending practices in libraries, software preservation, and ...


Ten Myths Around Open Scholarly Publishing, Jonathan P. Tennant, Harry Crane, Tom Crick, Jacinto Davila, Asura Enkhbayar, Johanna Havemann, Bianca Kramer, Ryan Martin, Paola Masuzzo, Andy Nobes, Curt Rice, Bárbara R. López, Tony Ross-Hellauer, Susanne Sattler, Paul Thacker, Marc Vanholsbeeck 2019 IGDORE, Leicester, United Kingdom

Ten Myths Around Open Scholarly Publishing, Jonathan P. Tennant, Harry Crane, Tom Crick, Jacinto Davila, Asura Enkhbayar, Johanna Havemann, Bianca Kramer, Ryan Martin, Paola Masuzzo, Andy Nobes, Curt Rice, Bárbara R. López, Tony Ross-Hellauer, Susanne Sattler, Paul Thacker, Marc Vanholsbeeck

Copyright, Fair Use, Scholarly Communication, etc.

The changing world of scholarly communication and the emergence of ‘Open Science’ or ‘Open Research’ has brought to light a number of controversial and hotly-debated topics. Yet, evidence-based rational debate is regularly drowned out by misinformed or exaggerated rhetoric, which does not benefit the evolving system of scholarly communication. The aim of this article is to provide a baseline evidence framework for ten of the most contested topics, in order to help frame and move forward discussions, practices and policies. We address preprints and scooping, the practice of copyright transfer, the function of peer review, and the legitimacy of ‘global ...


Data Exclusivities In The Age Of Big Data, Biologics, And Plurilaterals, Peter K. Yu 2019 Texas A&M University School of Law

Data Exclusivities In The Age Of Big Data, Biologics, And Plurilaterals, Peter K. Yu

Peter K. Yu

The past decade has seen many new developments impacting the intellectual property system. The introduction of big data analytics has transformed the fields of biotechnology and bioinformatics while ushering in major advances in drug development, clinical practices, and medical financing. The arrival of biologics and personalized medicines has also revolutionized the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries. In addition, the emergence of bilateral, regional, and plurilateral trade agreements have raised serious, and at times difficult, questions concerning the evolution of domestic and international intellectual property standards.

One topic linking all three developments together concerns the establishment of international standards to protect clinical ...


Chocolate, Fashion, Toys And Cabs: The Misunderstood Distinctiveness Of Non-Traditional Trademarks, Irene Calboli 2019 Texas A&M University School of Law

Chocolate, Fashion, Toys And Cabs: The Misunderstood Distinctiveness Of Non-Traditional Trademarks, Irene Calboli

Irene Calboli

Editorial Excerpt:

What do Cadbury, Toblerone and Kit-Kat chocolates, the Rubik’s Cube and Lego mini-figurine toys, Louboutin shoes, Bottega Veneta bags and London Taxi Company cabs all have in common? These products have been, along with several others, protagonists of the rising trend of registering shapes and other non-traditional trademarks in a variety of countries, and then, in several cases, protagonist of ensuing litigation addressing the validity of these marks. To a large extent, the review panels and the courts involved in these cases have declared several of these marks invalid or have reduced their scope considerably. Hence, these ...


Copyright Policy As Catalyst And Barrier To Innovation And Free Expression, Amanda Reid 2019 The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Copyright Policy As Catalyst And Barrier To Innovation And Free Expression, Amanda Reid

Catholic University Law Review

At its core, copyright is an innovation policy, a competition policy, and a free expression policy. Copyright seeks to balance incentivizing a public good with providing a private interest. Copyright’s purpose to catalyze creative expression and innovation is canonical; creativity and innovation are synergetic. Copyright is a means of promoting progress; copyright is not an end in itself. Much like freedom of expression and new innovations are not ends in themselves, copyright protection is not for its own sake. Freedom of expression is often heralded as a means of fostering democratic self-governance, truth, and happiness. Innovation is seen as ...


Full Cost In Translation: Awarding Expert Witness Fees In Copyright Litigation, Nicholas Vennekotter 2019 Fordham University School of Law

Full Cost In Translation: Awarding Expert Witness Fees In Copyright Litigation, Nicholas Vennekotter

Fordham Law Review

When deciding whether to bring or defend against copyright infringement claims, the cost of litigation plays a critical role in the minds of potential litigants. The cost of retaining experts, particularly, is a large factor in this calculus. Although U.S. courts generally require each party to cover the cost of their own legal fees during litigation, the Copyright Act of 1976 permits courts, in their discretion, to allow the prevailing party to recover “full costs.” Yet, the language “full costs” is considered ambiguous, which leads to inconsistent awards of costs among the appellate courts. The circuits disagree whether the ...


Thoughts On Patents And Information Literacy, Dave Zwicky 2019 Purdue University

Thoughts On Patents And Information Literacy, Dave Zwicky

Journal of the Patent and Trademark Resource Center Association

Patents are an under-used information source, in part because of an often-narrow focus by patent librarians on the tools and techniques of patentability searching. This approach can ignore a range of potential applications of patent information, using patents in their contexts as technical, design, historical, legal, and commercial documents. This paper suggests the adoption of a flexible approach, viewing patents and patent information in the greater context of information literacy, including that of the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, more commonly known as the ACRL Framework.


You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Repair: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act’S Effect On Right-To-Repair Legislation, Daniel Moore 2019 Texas A&M University School of Law (Student)

You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Repair: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act’S Effect On Right-To-Repair Legislation, Daniel Moore

Texas A&M Law Review

Consumers are keeping their electronic devices longer today than in the past because the prices of the devices have increased. Increased prices have culminated in more consumers needing their devices repaired. In turn, manufacturers use the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, a federal law, and digital rights management to force consumers to get their devices repaired by either the device manufacturer or one of its authorized repairers. In response, states have considered right-to-repair laws which require manufacturers to make repair tools, equipment, and software available to device owners and independent repair shops. While almost half of the country’s state legislatures ...


Copyright And The Music Modernization Act, Eric Harbeson 2019 University of Colorado at Boulder

Copyright And The Music Modernization Act, Eric Harbeson

American Music Research Center Faculty Contributions

The Music Modernization Act of 2018 is the most significant update to U.S. copyright law in many decades. Title 2 of the Act provides a long-needed, if imperfect, solution to a longstanding problem surrounding recordings fixed before Feb. 15, 1972. The article provides a summary of the key provisions in the new act, and how they may affect the work of archivists.


Does Patented Information Promote The Progress Of Technology?, Jonathan H. Ashtor 2019 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Does Patented Information Promote The Progress Of Technology?, Jonathan H. Ashtor

Northwestern University Law Review

This Article investigates the relationship between the exclusive rights of patents, their information disclosures, and the impact they have on the development of future technologies. An examination of over 1000 patents that courts have held valid or invalid reveals a significant positive relationship. Specifically, the private rights and technological impact of patents rise and fall together, and moreover, both are related to the quantity of new and useful technical information contained in their disclosures.

This Article identifies, for the first time, significant differences between the technological impact of valid patents and invalid patents, as measured by the future patented inventions ...


The Supreme Court Bar At The Bar Of Patents, Paul Gugliuzza 2019 Boston University School of Law

The Supreme Court Bar At The Bar Of Patents, Paul Gugliuzza

Faculty Scholarship

Over the past two decades, a few dozen lawyers have come to dominate practice before the U.S. Supreme Court. By many accounts, these elite lawyers—whose clients are often among the largest corporations in the world—have spurred the Court to hear more cases that businesses care about and to decide those cases in favor of their clients. The Supreme Court’s recent case law on antitrust, arbitration, punitive damages, class actions, and more provides copious examples.

Though it is often overlooked in discussions of the emergent Supreme Court bar, patent law is another area in which the Court ...


"Good Faith" Trademark Infringement: The Ninth Circuit's Approach To The Tea Rose-Rectanus Doctrine, Roya Tabibi 2019 Boston College Law School

"Good Faith" Trademark Infringement: The Ninth Circuit's Approach To The Tea Rose-Rectanus Doctrine, Roya Tabibi

Boston College Law Review

In 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held in Stone Creek, Inc. v. Omnia Italian Design, Inc. that the “good faith” element of the Tea Rose-Rectanus doctrine, a common-law affirmative defense to trademark infringement, requires the junior user to have used the trademark without knowledge of the senior user’s prior use of the mark. This ruling echoed the Seventh Circuit’s similar finding in 1982 in Money Store v. Harriscorp Finance, Inc., and the Eighth Circuit’s finding in 2001 in National Association for Healthcare Communications, Inc. v. Central Arkansas Area Agency on Aging ...


Specialized Trial Courts In Patent Litigation: A Review Of The Patent Pilot Program's Impact On Appellate Reversal Rates At The Five-Year Mark, Amy Semet 2019 Princeton University

Specialized Trial Courts In Patent Litigation: A Review Of The Patent Pilot Program's Impact On Appellate Reversal Rates At The Five-Year Mark, Amy Semet

Boston College Law Review

Do specialized trial court judges make more accurate decisions in patent law cases? In 2011, Congress passed a law setting up a ten-year pilot program to enhance expertise in patent litigation by funneling more trial court decisions to fourteen select district courts. Now that the five-year mark has passed, has the program had its intended effect of increasing accuracy, as measured by less reversal of pilot judges by the Federal Circuit? This Article analyzes trial court patent cases filed from September 2011 through September 2016, focusing specifically on whether the appellate treatment of cases heard by district court judges participating ...


Antitrust Overreach: Undoing Cooperative Standardization In The Digital Economy, Jonathan M. Barnett 2019 University of Southern California

Antitrust Overreach: Undoing Cooperative Standardization In The Digital Economy, Jonathan M. Barnett

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

Information technology markets in general, and wireless communications markets in particular, rely on standardization mechanisms to develop interoperable devices for rapid and secure data processing, storage and transmission. From 2G through the emergent 5G standard, wireless communications markets have largely achieved standardization through cooperative multi-firm arrangements that likely outperform the historically dominant alternatives of government monopoly, which is subject to informational deficits and regulatory capture, and private monopoly, which suffers from pricing and other distortions inherent to protected market positions. This cooperative process has successfully relied on a mix of reasonably secure patents, quasi-contractual licensing commitments supplemented by reputational discipline ...


Artificial Intelligence And Patent Ownership, W. Michael Schuster 2019 Oklahoma State University

Artificial Intelligence And Patent Ownership, W. Michael Schuster

Washington and Lee Law Review

Invention by artificial intelligence (AI) is the future of innovation. Unfortunately, as discovered through Freedom of Information Act requests, the U.S. patent regime has yet to determine how it will address patents for inventions created solely by AI (AI patents). This Article fills that void by presenting the first comprehensive analysis on the allocation of patent rights arising from invention by AI. To this end, this Article employs Coase Theorem and its corollaries to determine who should be allowed to secure these patents to maximize economic efficiency. The study concludes that letting firms using AI to create new technologies ...


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2019 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Facing The Inevitable: The Inevitable Disclosure Doctrine And The Defend Trade Secrets Act Of 2016, M. Claire Flowers 2019 Washington and Lee University School of Law

Facing The Inevitable: The Inevitable Disclosure Doctrine And The Defend Trade Secrets Act Of 2016, M. Claire Flowers

Washington and Lee Law Review

Multiple federal courts have recognized and applied the inevitable disclosure doctrine in cases brought by employers against former employees under the DTSA. The inevitable disclosure doctrine allows a business to temporarily enjoin the new employment of a former employee by a competitor on the theory that the employee learned confidential information while working for that business which the employee cannot possibly forget or refrain from relying on during her employment with the competitor. The application of this doctrine under the DTSA is controversial for two reasons. First, some states refuse to recognize the inevitable disclosure doctrine due, in part, to ...


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