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Indian and Aboriginal Law Commons

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All Articles in Indian and Aboriginal Law

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The Alliance Between Payday Lenders And Tribes: Are Both Tribal Sovereignty And Consumer Protection At Risk?, Nathalie Martin, Joshua Schwartz 2017 Selected Works

The Alliance Between Payday Lenders And Tribes: Are Both Tribal Sovereignty And Consumer Protection At Risk?, Nathalie Martin, Joshua Schwartz

Nathalie Martin

No abstract provided.


Akiachak Native Community V. United States Department Of Interior, Lillian M. Alvernaz 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Akiachak Native Community V. United States Department Of Interior, Lillian M. Alvernaz

Public Land and Resources Law Review

Alaska Native Tribes have long been classified differently than the federally recognized Indian tribes in the rest of the country. The Akiachak decision contributes to the shifting treatment of Alaska Native Tribes and clarifies their relationship with the federal government. The ability to put land into trust is essential to the protection of generations to come and the exercise of sovereign authority. By enabling Alaska Native tribes the ability to petition to put tribally owned fee land in trust, the DOI promotes and encourages tribal self-governance and empowerment.


Free, Prior, And Informed Consent And Reconciliation In Canada: Proposals To Implement Articles 19 And 32 Of The Un Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples, Sasha Boutilier 2017 University of Toronto

Free, Prior, And Informed Consent And Reconciliation In Canada: Proposals To Implement Articles 19 And 32 Of The Un Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples, Sasha Boutilier

Western Journal of Legal Studies

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has repeatedly promised to meet the Indian Residential School Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s recommendation to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) as a framework for reconciliation. This commitment is significant as Canada’s position on UNDRIP has been highly contested. In particular, the compatibility of UNDRIP’s Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) standard with Canadian law has been repeatedly called into question. This work evaluates the possibility and importance of implementing FPIC in Canada. It begins with an overview of FPIC internationally and of FPIC in relation ...


The Native American Struggle Between Economic Growth And Cultural, Religious, And Environmental Protection: A Corporate Solution, Joseph Patterson 2017 Notre Dame Law School

The Native American Struggle Between Economic Growth And Cultural, Religious, And Environmental Protection: A Corporate Solution, Joseph Patterson

Notre Dame Law Review Online

This Essay recommends a flexible corporate solution to Native American property rights issues.


Closing Time: Removing The State Of Oklahoma From Alcohol Regulation In Indian Country, Ryan Wilson 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Closing Time: Removing The State Of Oklahoma From Alcohol Regulation In Indian Country, Ryan Wilson

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Traffic Of Native American Women, Nasrin M. Chaudhry 2017 nc201042

The Traffic Of Native American Women, Nasrin M. Chaudhry

Undergraduate Theses and Professional Papers

No abstract available.


Trust Or Bust: Complications With Tribal Trust Obligations And Environmental Sovereignty, Nadia B. Ahmad 2017 Barry University

Trust Or Bust: Complications With Tribal Trust Obligations And Environmental Sovereignty, Nadia B. Ahmad

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Western Shoshone Treaty Activism, Us Indian Claims Law & Human Rights Violations, Nathan Brien 2017 University of Colorado, Boulder

Western Shoshone Treaty Activism, Us Indian Claims Law & Human Rights Violations, Nathan Brien

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This project follows the treaty-based legal efforts of sisters Mary and Carrie Dann in their fight to assert Western Shoshone land rights against the US government. Beginning with a 1952 claims case before the Indian Claims Commission, the US attempt to make restitutions for the wrongful taking of Western Shoshone lands itself threatened persistent Shoshone treaty rights. The Dann sisters, along with other, self-described Western Shoshone “traditionals”, undertook to reverse the federal liquidation of Shoshone treaty rights, engaging federal claims commissioners, attorneys, and courts along the way. Their legal activism relied heavily on the assertion of sovereign rights under the ...


Responsible Resource Development And Prevention Of Sex Trafficking: Safeguarding Native Women And Children On The Fort Berthold Reservation, Kathleen Finn, Erica Gadja, Thomas Perin, Carla Fredericks 2017 American Indian Law Clinic, University of Colorado Law School

Responsible Resource Development And Prevention Of Sex Trafficking: Safeguarding Native Women And Children On The Fort Berthold Reservation, Kathleen Finn, Erica Gadja, Thomas Perin, Carla Fredericks

Articles

In 2010, large deposits of oil and natural gas were found in the Bakken shale formation, much of which is encompassed by the Fort Berthold Indian reservation, home to the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation (“MHA Nation” or “Three Affiliated Tribes” or “the Tribe”). However, rapid oil and gas development has brought an unprecedented rise of violent crime on and near the Fort Berthold reservation. Specifically, the influx of well-paid male oil and gas workers, living in temporary housing often referred to as “man camps,” has coincided with a disturbing increase in sex trafficking of Native women. The social risks ...


Fathers And Feminism: The Case Against Genetic Entitlement, Jennifer S. Hendricks 2017 University of Colorado Law School

Fathers And Feminism: The Case Against Genetic Entitlement, Jennifer S. Hendricks

Articles

This Article makes the case against a nascent consensus among feminist and other progressive scholars about men's parental rights. Most progressive proposals to reform parentage law focus on making it easier for men to assert parental rights, especially when they are not married to the mother of the child. These proposals may seek, for example, to require the state to make more extensive efforts to locate biological fathers, to require pregnant women to notify men of their impending paternity, or to require new mothers to give biological fathers access to infants.

These proposals disregard the mother's existing parental ...


Operationalizing Free, Prior, And Informed Consent, Carla F. Fredericks 2017 University of Colorado Law School

Operationalizing Free, Prior, And Informed Consent, Carla F. Fredericks

Articles

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) has acknowledged varying ways in which international actors can protect, respect and remedy the rights of indigenous peoples. One of these methods is the concept of free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) as described in Articles 10, 19, 28 and 29. There has been much debate in the international community over the legal status of the UNDRIP, and member states have done little to implement it. In applied contexts, many entities like extractive industries and conservation groups are aware of risks inherent in not soliciting FPIC and have endeavored to ...


They Were Here First: American Indian Tribes, Race, And The Constitutional Minimum, Sarah Krakoff 2017 University of Colorado Law School

They Were Here First: American Indian Tribes, Race, And The Constitutional Minimum, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

In American law, Native nations (denominated in the Constitution and elsewhere as “tribes”) are sovereigns with a direct relationship with the federal government. Tribes’ governmental status situates them differently from other minority groups for many legal purposes, including equal protection analysis. Under current equal protection doctrine, classifications that further the federal government’s unique relationship with tribes and their members are subject to rationality review. Yet this deferential approach has recently been subject to criticism and is currently being challenged in the courts. Swept up in the larger drift toward colorblind or race-neutral understandings of the Constitution, advocates and commentators ...


Consult, Consent, And Veto: International Norms And Canadian Treaties, Shin Imai 2017 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Consult, Consent, And Veto: International Norms And Canadian Treaties, Shin Imai

Articles & Book Chapters

Large parts of Canada, from Ontario to parts of British Columbia and north to the Northwest Territories, are covered by the “numbered treaties”, signed between First Nations and the Crown between 1871 and 1929. These treaties provide for the continuation of Indigenous hunting, fishing and harvesting activities until the land is “taken up” by the provincial Crown for activities such as mining, lumbering and settlement. This draft book chapter argues that consent of First Nations should be required before further development that impact on their harvesting rights. The consent standard has already been widely adopted in the private sector both ...


Métis Action, Canadian Law And Historical Research: Preliminary Thoughts About Strategies For Current Efforts, Signa A. Daum Shanks 2017 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Métis Action, Canadian Law And Historical Research: Preliminary Thoughts About Strategies For Current Efforts, Signa A. Daum Shanks

Articles & Book Chapters

Given the chatter and more substantive concern about Indigenous peoples as of late, many different people and institutions are both recalling what they have done (or have not done) in the past and what they will do next. While they do so, and evident in comments from everyone from the Prime Minister (Trudeau 2015) to a rally protester, the subject of how to move forward is also of issue. Within these conversations, non-Indigenous places and peoples have contributed much to the knowledge used to make more informed decisions (Eberts 2014; Slattery 2007). At the same time, Indigenous researchers and activists ...


Property And Sovereignty: An Indian Reserve And A Canadian City, Douglas C. Harris 2017 Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia

Property And Sovereignty: An Indian Reserve And A Canadian City, Douglas C. Harris

Faculty Publications

Property rights, wrote Morris Cohen in 1927, are delegations of sovereign power. They are created by the state and operate to establish limits on its power. As such, the allocation of property rights is an exercise of sovereignty and a limited delegation of it. Sixty years later, Joseph Singer used Cohen’s conceptual framing in a critical review of developments in American Indian law. Where the US Supreme Court had the opportunity to label an American Indian interest as either a sovereign interest or a property interest, he argued, it invariably chose to the disadvantage of the Indians. Within Canada ...


The Global Protection Of Traditional Knowledge: Searching For The Minimum Consensus, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 42 (2017), Aman Gebru 2017 John Marshall Law School

The Global Protection Of Traditional Knowledge: Searching For The Minimum Consensus, 17 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 42 (2017), Aman Gebru

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The protection of traditional knowledge (TK) – the know-how, skills, innovations and practices of indigenous peoples and local communities has been a subject of heated debate in many international forums. TK has proved to be useful as an input in modern industries. For instance, pharmaceutical companies have used medicinal TK to develop drugs more quickly. Despite its value, TK faces an alarming rate of loss and there are many initiatives that attempt to preserve it for posterity. However, almost every major issue on TK protection is contentious, including whether international TK protection is necessary or if domestic legislation alone would suffice ...


Indigenous Legal Orders In Canada - A Literature Review, Michael Coyle 2017 UWO Law

Indigenous Legal Orders In Canada - A Literature Review, Michael Coyle

Law Publications

This is a literature review of publications concerning Indigenous legal orders in Canada. Funded by a SSHRC knowledge synthesis grant (2016), it follows the required format for Knowledge Synthesis Reports.

The suppression of Indigenous legal orders was an integral part of the colonial project to assimilate Indigenous peoples, a project exemplified by Canada’s now notorious experiment with Indian Residential Schools. Long marginalized by the Canadian state, the importance of Aboriginal peoples’ own legal systems has recently been recognized by the Supreme Court of Canada, by academics (including prominent Indigenous scholars) and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, who all have ...


Continuing To Work For Indian Country In The 115th Congress, T. Michael Andrews 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Continuing To Work For Indian Country In The 115th Congress, T. Michael Andrews

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Fairness Of Tribal Court Juries And Non-Indian Defendants, Julia M. Bedell 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

The Fairness Of Tribal Court Juries And Non-Indian Defendants, Julia M. Bedell

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


Improving Microfinance Through International Agreements And Tailoring The System To Assist Indigenous Populations, Jacob Krysiak 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Improving Microfinance Through International Agreements And Tailoring The System To Assist Indigenous Populations, Jacob Krysiak

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


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