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Review Essay: “Indians Are Us?: Culture And Genocide In Native North America" By Me Monroe, John LaVelle 2018 University of New Mexico

Review Essay: “Indians Are Us?: Culture And Genocide In Native North America" By Me Monroe, John Lavelle

John P. LaVelle

Indians Are Us? is a collection of commentaries on American Indian political and social affairs, written in the truculent tone that readers have come to expect from writer Ward Churchill. Like its predecessors, Fantasies of the Master Race and Struggle far the Land, this latest Churchill project consists largely of polemical pieces hastily compiled from obscure leftist publications.


Gmos, International Law And Indigenous Peoples, Casandia Bellevue 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Gmos, International Law And Indigenous Peoples, Casandia Bellevue

Pace International Law Review

This Article sprung from a desire to discover why—despite scientific uncertainty and the oft-cited precautionary principle in international law—genetically modified organisms are still allowed to spread via international trade and natural ecological cycles. While exploring this topic, it did not take long to come across the environmental justice impacts of genetically modified crops, and their particularly disparate impact upon indigenous peoples across the globe. Not only are GMOs threatening biodiversity and our planet, but also the very existence and cultural foundations of many indigenous groups.

This Article seeks to answer the following questions: What are the international agreements ...


A Dollar For Your Thoughts: Dollar General And The Supreme Court's Struggle With Tribal Civil Jurisdiction, Hallie McDonald 2018 Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University

A Dollar For Your Thoughts: Dollar General And The Supreme Court's Struggle With Tribal Civil Jurisdiction, Hallie Mcdonald

Hofstra Law Review

No abstract provided.


“The Lands…Belonged To Them, Once By The Indian Title, Twice For Having Defended Them…And Thrice For Having Built And Lived On Them”: The Law And Politics Of Métis Title, Karen Drake, Adam Gaudry 2018 Lakehead University

“The Lands…Belonged To Them, Once By The Indian Title, Twice For Having Defended Them…And Thrice For Having Built And Lived On Them”: The Law And Politics Of Métis Title, Karen Drake, Adam Gaudry

Karen Drake

To predict what is on the horizon of the Métis legal landscape, we can look to jurisprudence on First Nations’ rights, given that Métis rights cases are typically ten to fifteen years behind those of First Nations. With the release of the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision in Tsilhqot’in, the next big issue in Métis law may be Métis title. Scholars have doubted the ability of Métis to establish Aboriginal title in Canada for two reasons: first, Métis were too mobile, and second, Métis were too immobile. This paper critically analyzes these positions and argues that the case ...


Revisiting Seminole Rock, Jeffrey A. Pojanowski 2018 Notre Dame Law School

Revisiting Seminole Rock, Jeffrey A. Pojanowski

Journal Articles

The rule that reviewing courts must defer to agencies’ interpretations of their own regulations has come under scrutiny in recent years. Critics contend that this doctrine, often associated with the 1997 Supreme Court decision Auer v. Robbins, violates the separation of powers, gives agencies perverse regulatory incentives, and undermines the judiciary’s duty to say what the law is.

This essay offers a different argument as to why Auer is literally and prosaically bad law. Auer deference appears to be grounded on a misunderstanding of its originating case, the 1945 decision Bowles v. Seminole Rock. A closer look at Seminole ...


Rebuilding Trust? The Sand Creek Massacre And The Federal-Tribal Trust Relationship In Flute V. United States, Alexander Sokolosky 2018 University of Oklahoma College of Law

Rebuilding Trust? The Sand Creek Massacre And The Federal-Tribal Trust Relationship In Flute V. United States, Alexander Sokolosky

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Standing Rock, The Sioux Treaties, And The Limits Of The Supremacy Clause, Carla F. Fredericks, Jesse D. Heibel 2018 University of Colorado Law School

Standing Rock, The Sioux Treaties, And The Limits Of The Supremacy Clause, Carla F. Fredericks, Jesse D. Heibel

Articles

The controversy surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline (“DAPL”) has put the peaceful plains of North Dakota in the national and international spotlight, drawing thousands of people to the confluence of the Missouri and Cannonball Rivers outside of Standing Rock Sioux Reservation for prayer and peaceful protest in defense of the Sioux Tribes’ treaties, lands, cultural property, and waters. Spanning over 7 months, including the harsh North Dakota winter, the gathering was visited by indigenous leaders and communities from around the world and represents arguably the largest gathering of indigenous peoples in the United States in more than 100 years.

At ...


"At Bears Ears We Can Hear The Voices Of Our Ancestors In Every Canyon And On Every Mesa Top": The Creation Of The First Native National Monument, Charles Wilkinson 2018 University of Colorado Law School

"At Bears Ears We Can Hear The Voices Of Our Ancestors In Every Canyon And On Every Mesa Top": The Creation Of The First Native National Monument, Charles Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Chapter 8: Indigenous Belonging: Membership And Identity In The Undrip: Articles 9, 33, 35, And 36, Shin Imai, Kathryn Gunn 2018 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Chapter 8: Indigenous Belonging: Membership And Identity In The Undrip: Articles 9, 33, 35, And 36, Shin Imai, Kathryn Gunn

Articles & Book Chapters

The recognition of Indigenous peoples' right to determine their own membership is crucial for their ability to meaningfully exercise their right to self-determination. The Declaration addresses rights of membership directly in Article 9 (right to belong), 33 (right to determine membership), 35 (right to determine responsibilities of members), and 36 (right to maintain relations across borders). Together, these provisions reinforce the right of Indigenous peoples to define themselves, both in terms of membership and geographic scope.


Public Lands, Conservation, And The Possibility Of Justice, Sarah Krakoff 2018 University of Colorado Law School

Public Lands, Conservation, And The Possibility Of Justice, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

On December 28, 2016, President Obama issued a proclamation designating the Bears Ears National Monument pursuant to his authority under the Antiquities Act of 1906, which allows the President to create monuments on federal public lands. Bears Ears, which is located in the heart of Utah’s dramatic red rock country, contains a surfeit of ancient Puebloan cliff-dwellings, petroglyphs, pictographs, and archeological artifacts. The area is also famous for its paleontological finds and its desert biodiversity. Like other national monuments, Bears Ears therefore readily meets the statutory objective of preserving “historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or ...


By Any Means: How One Federal Agency Is Turning Tribal Sovereignty On Its Head, Clifton Cottrell 2017 Native American Financial Services Association

By Any Means: How One Federal Agency Is Turning Tribal Sovereignty On Its Head, Clifton Cottrell

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Solution Before Pollution: Mining And International Transboundary Rivers In Southeast Alaska, Britany Kee’ ya aa. Lindley 2017 Seattle University, School of Law

Solution Before Pollution: Mining And International Transboundary Rivers In Southeast Alaska, Britany Kee’ Ya Aa. Lindley

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Beyond A Zero-Sum Federal Trust Responsibility: Lessons From Federal Indian Energy Policy, Monte Mills 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law, University of Montana

Beyond A Zero-Sum Federal Trust Responsibility: Lessons From Federal Indian Energy Policy, Monte Mills

American Indian Law Journal

The federal government’s trust relationship with federally- recognized Indian tribes is a product of the last two centuries of Federal Indian Law and federal-tribal relations. For approximately the last 50 years, the federal government has sought to promote tribal self-determination as a means to carry out its trust responsibilities to Indian tribes; but the shadows of prior federal policies, based largely on notions of tribal incompetence and federal paternalism, remain. Perhaps no other policy arena better demonstrates the history, evolution, and promise for reform of the federal trust relationship than Federal Indian energy policy, or the range of federal ...


Conservation Easements: A Flexible New Tool For Washington Tribes, A Case Study Of The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, David P. Papiez 2017 Seattle University School of Law

Conservation Easements: A Flexible New Tool For Washington Tribes, A Case Study Of The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, David P. Papiez

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


A Hell Of A Complex: The Miscarriages Of The Federal Hydropower Licensing Regime, Derek Red Arrow Frank 2017 Seattle University, School of Law

A Hell Of A Complex: The Miscarriages Of The Federal Hydropower Licensing Regime, Derek Red Arrow Frank

American Indian Law Journal

What you are about to read is an illustration of systemic racism. Systemic racism is the current effects of statutes and policies developed through a singular and racially-charged narrative. The current hydropower relicensing regime fails to acknowledge the overarching Treaty-reserved rights of American Indian tribes while statutorily granting state and federal authorities the power to prescribe mandatory conditions on hydropower projects. This fact remains constant whether the hydropower project is within or outside a tribe’s reservation or aboriginal territory. Specifically, the Hells Canyon Complex, which rests along the Snake River, has had and continues to have enormous impacts on ...


The Sioux's Suits: Global Law And The Dakota Access Pipeline, Stephen Young 2017 University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

The Sioux's Suits: Global Law And The Dakota Access Pipeline, Stephen Young

American Indian Law Journal

The Sioux Tribe’s lawsuits and protests against the Dakota Access Pipelines (DAPL) received an incredible amount of international attention in ways that many Indigenous peoples’ protests have not. This article argues that attention exists because the Sioux Tribe has been at the epicenter of the Indigenous peoples’ rights movement in international law. Accordingly, they have invoked or claimed international human rights—particularly free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC)— to complicate, and perhaps destabilize, the DAPL’s development. However, the importance of their activism is not merely in claiming human rights.

Based upon a global map of law that involves ...


Indian Sovereignty, General Federal Laws, And The Canons Of Construction: An Overview And Update, Bryan H. Wildenthal 2017 Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Indian Sovereignty, General Federal Laws, And The Canons Of Construction: An Overview And Update, Bryan H. Wildenthal

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


United States V. Osage Wind, Llc, Summer Carmack 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

United States V. Osage Wind, Llc, Summer Carmack

Public Land and Resources Law Review

The Osage Nation, as owner of the beneficial interest in its mineral estate, issues federally-approved leases to persons and entities who wish to conduct mineral development on its lands. After an energy-development company, Osage Wind, leased privately-owned surface lands within Tribal reservation boundaries and began to excavate minerals for purposes of constructing a wind farm, the United States brought suit on the Tribe’s behalf. In the ensuing litigation, the Osage Nation insisted that Osage Wind should have obtained a mineral lease from the Tribe before beginning its work. In its decision, the Tenth Circuit applied one of the Indian ...


Constitutional Conflict And The Development Of Canadian Aboriginal Law, Guy Charlton, Xiang Gao 2017 Auckland University of Technology

Constitutional Conflict And The Development Of Canadian Aboriginal Law, Guy Charlton, Xiang Gao

The University of Notre Dame Australia Law Review

This paper argues that aboriginal rights in Canada have been greatly affected by 19 th century governmental and social conflicts within the Canadian colonial state. These conflicts, largely over the ownership of land and regulatory authority between the federal government and the provinces necessarily impacted the First Nations on the ground while affecting how their legal claims were recognized and implemented. In particular they impacted the legal efficacy of treaty rights, the scope of rights recognised by the courts and an expansive legally protected notion of indigenous sovereignty. As a result, the rights now protected under sec. 25 and 35 ...


Indigenous Rights In The Trump Era, Tereza M. Szeghi 2017 University of Dayton

Indigenous Rights In The Trump Era, Tereza M. Szeghi

The Social Practice of Human Rights: Charting the Frontiers of Research and Advocacy

This paper examines the ways in which the Dakota Access Pipeline and the related protests were divergently covered in mainstream versus alternative news sources and what this divergent coverage suggests about the current status of American Indian affairs and the role of American Indians in the U.S. cultural imaginary. Moreover, the paper will address the status of American Indian tribal sovereignty in the Trump era more broadly, with particular focus on American Indians' treaty-related rights to self-determination in the use of their lands.


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