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Impact Assessment And Responsible Business Guidance Tools In The Extractive Sector: Implications For Human Rights, Gender And Stakeholder Engagement, Sara Seck, Penelope Simons, Naiomi Metallic, Meinhard Doelle, Bayo Majekolagbe 2020 Dalhousie University Schulich School of Law

Impact Assessment And Responsible Business Guidance Tools In The Extractive Sector: Implications For Human Rights, Gender And Stakeholder Engagement, Sara Seck, Penelope Simons, Naiomi Metallic, Meinhard Doelle, Bayo Majekolagbe

Responsible Business Conduct and Impact Assessment Law

This report aims to identify RBC tools referenced in the literature as relevant and/or promoted to Canadian extractive companies operating within and outside Canada. While not appraising or pronouncing on the quality of RBC tools, we consider the different actors that promote these diverse tools and whether there is a coherent framework for the efficient and effective application of current and future tools. We focus on RBC tools on human rights, stakeholder engagement, the rights of Indigenous peoples, and the rights of women and girls. Further, we review the position of scholars on the relationship between RBC and IA.


A Narrowing Field Of View: An Investigation Into The Relationship Between The Principles Of Treaty Interpretation And The Conceptual Framework Of Canadian Federalism, Joshua Ben David Nichols 2020 Faculty of Law, University of Alberta

A Narrowing Field Of View: An Investigation Into The Relationship Between The Principles Of Treaty Interpretation And The Conceptual Framework Of Canadian Federalism, Joshua Ben David Nichols

Osgoode Hall Law Journal

In its recent decisions in Tsilhqot’in Nation and Grassy Narrows, the Supreme Court of Canada has significantly altered the position of Indigenous peoples within the structure of Canadian federalism. This article sets out to investigate the basis for the Court’s jurisdiction to change this structure. Its approach is historical, as it covers judicial treaty interpretation from St Catherine’s Milling to Grassy Narrows. By contextualizing the most recent change in light of the last 250 years of treaty making, we can see how the notion of Crown sovereignty has become entangled with the Westphalian model of the state ...


Out With The New, In With The Old: Re-Implementing Traditional Forms Of Justice In Indian Country, Nicholas R. Sanchez 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Out With The New, In With The Old: Re-Implementing Traditional Forms Of Justice In Indian Country, Nicholas R. Sanchez

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Indian Child Welfare Act Annual Case Law Update And Commentary, Kathryn Fort, Adrian T. Smith 2020 Michigan State University College of Law

Indian Child Welfare Act Annual Case Law Update And Commentary, Kathryn Fort, Adrian T. Smith

American Indian Law Journal

Annually there is an average of 200 appellate cases dealing with the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) —though this includes published and unpublished opinions.[1] Since our first annual review of the case law in 2017, the numbers remain stable. There are approximately thirty reported state appellate court cases involving ICWA each year. This annual review is the only systematic look at the ICWA cases on appeal, including an analysis of who is appealing, what the primary issues are on appeal, and what topical trends are.

This article provides a comprehensive catalogue of published ICWA cases from across all fifty ...


Mapping A Way Through Disaster And Emergency Issues Involving Indian Country And The Importance Of Legal Preparedness, Brian T. Candelaria 2020 Oklahoma City University School of Law

Mapping A Way Through Disaster And Emergency Issues Involving Indian Country And The Importance Of Legal Preparedness, Brian T. Candelaria

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


P2p Lending Can Increase Capital To Capitally Starved Indian Country, Craig Nichols 2020 Brigham Young University School of Law

P2p Lending Can Increase Capital To Capitally Starved Indian Country, Craig Nichols

American Indian Law Journal

No abstract provided.


The Violence Against Women's Act: From The Criminalization Of Domestic Violence Through Modern Political Challenges, Carrie Anderson 2020 University of Nebraska at Omaha

The Violence Against Women's Act: From The Criminalization Of Domestic Violence Through Modern Political Challenges, Carrie Anderson

Theses/Capstones/Creative Projects

The Violence Against Women’s Act, or VAWA, is a landmark piece of federal legislation to combat domestic violence in the United States. It passed in 1994 following various state efforts to stop intimate partner violence. Broad federal legislation was needed to end domestic violence because of the unique nature of the crime including the strong connection between victims and perpetrators, the vast scale of the problem, and the reoccurring nature of domestic violence (Fagan, p. 28-29, 1996). VAWA has been expanded through reauthorization efforts in 2000, 2005, and 2013. Reform efforts have focused on increasing protections for victims especially ...


Fraying The Knot: Marital Property, Probate, And Practical Problems With Tribal Marriage Bans, Suzianne D. Painter-Thorne 2020 Brooklyn Law School

Fraying The Knot: Marital Property, Probate, And Practical Problems With Tribal Marriage Bans, Suzianne D. Painter-Thorne

Brooklyn Law Review

While marriage equality is thought to be the law of the land, that is not necessarily true for members of nearly a dozen Indian tribes that continue to prohibit same-sex marriage. Whether a tribe permits same-sex marriage rests on the tribes’ inherent authority to govern their own internal affairs. Acting pursuant to that inherent authority, many tribes were leaders on the issue of marriage equality, legalizing same-sex marriage when most states prohibited such marriages. Other tribes, however, like the Navajo Nation, limit marriages to “one man and one woman.” As a consequence, a married Indian couple may have their marriage ...


Fmc Corp. V. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Seth T. Bonilla 2020 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Fmc Corp. V. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Seth T. Bonilla

Public Land & Resources Law Review

In 1998, FMC Corporation agreed to submit to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes’ permitting processes, including the payment of fees, for clean-up work required as part of consent decree negotiations with the Environmental Protection Agency. Then, in 2002, FMC refused to pay the Tribes under a permitting agreement entered into by both parties, even though the company continued to store hazardous waste on land within the Shoshone-Bannock Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho. FMC challenged the Tribes’ authority to enforce the $1.5 million permitting fees first in tribal court and later challenged the Tribes’ authority to exercise civil regulatory and adjudicatory jurisdiction ...


Juliana V. United States, Anthony Reed 2020 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Juliana V. United States, Anthony Reed

Public Land & Resources Law Review

Plaintiffs sued the United States government for promoting activities that were known to pollute the atmosphere and cause climate change. They claimed the government’s policies violated their rights under the substantive due process clause of the Fifth Amendment, the equal protection clause of the Ninth Amendment, and the public trust doctrine. The Ninth Circuit held it was not within the court’s Article III power to create and oversee a comprehensive plan capable of redressing the Plaintiffs’ injuries and, therefore, Plaintiffs lacked standing.


The Convention For The Safeguarding Of The Intangible Cultural Heritage (Csich) And The Control Of Indigenous Culture: A Critical Comment On Power And Indigenous Rights, Jonathan Liljeblad 2020 William & Mary Law School

The Convention For The Safeguarding Of The Intangible Cultural Heritage (Csich) And The Control Of Indigenous Culture: A Critical Comment On Power And Indigenous Rights, Jonathan Liljeblad

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

The Preamble of the 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (CSICH) recognizes the connection between indigenous peoples and intangible cultural heritage. The convention indicates that part of its mission is to protect the intangible cultural heritage of indigenous peoples against the processes of globalization and social transformation. The convention, however, has been critiqued for the manner in which it attempts to manage intangible cultural heritage, with critics charging that the convention fosters a power structure that favors states and thereby threatens to marginalize indigenous peoples from control over their own cultures. Such criticism raises a question ...


Silent Intent? Analyzing The Congressional Intent Requirement To Abrogate Tribal Sovereign Immunity, Michael Bevilacqua 2020 Boston College Law School

Silent Intent? Analyzing The Congressional Intent Requirement To Abrogate Tribal Sovereign Immunity, Michael Bevilacqua

Boston College Law Review

On February 26, 2019, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in Buchwald Capital Advisors, LLC v. Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians (In re Greektown Holdings, LLC III) held that Congress did not intend to abrogate tribal sovereign immunity through the enactment of the Bankruptcy Code, Title 11 of the U.S. Code. In so holding, the Sixth Circuit split from the Ninth Circuit and emphasized the long-held principle that all ambiguities in statutes be construed in a manner that favors the Indian tribes. This Comment argues that the Sixth Circuit properly applied the standard ...


Compensation Regarding The Sioux Nation, Jacob DeGallery 2020 Germanna Community College

Compensation Regarding The Sioux Nation, Jacob Degallery

Student Writing

The Sioux Nation has been treated unfairly during the Lakota Wars and is still facing many of the same problems with reservation land rights. By looking at past and recent incidents, such as the injustice of removing of Sioux from the Black Hills and the Dakota Pipeline, the problem is explained, and potential solutions can be discussed. The Sioux should be fairly compensated for the loss of land and further land violations such as the issues regarding the Standing Rock Reservation stopped. The possibilities of Tribal Sovereignty and recognition within the Black Hills are specifically mentioned as potential solutions to ...


The Indigenous Decade In Review, Christine Zuni Cruz 2020 University of New Mexico School of Law

The Indigenous Decade In Review, Christine Zuni Cruz

SMU Law Review Forum

This Article considers the decade, 2010 to 2019, in respect to indigenous peoples in the United States. The degree of invisibility of indigenous peoples, in spite of the existence of 574 federally recognized tribes with political status, is a central issue in major cases and events of the decade. Land and environment, social concerns, and collective identity are the three areas through which this Article considers the decade. The Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, endorsed in 2010, sets a measure for the nation-state’s engagement with indigenous peoples possessed of self-determination. The criticality of a new place in ...


American Indians And The Right To Vote: Why The Courts Are Not Enough, Milan Kumar 2020 Boston College Law School

American Indians And The Right To Vote: Why The Courts Are Not Enough, Milan Kumar

Boston College Law Review

American Indians and Alaska Natives face new barriers in exercising their fundamental right to vote. Recently, states have introduced and implemented facially neutral voting rules aimed at eliminating voter fraud. These rules, as well as strict voter identification and increased reliance on mail-in ballots, disproportionately suppress American Indian votes. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was critical in providing Americans Indians a way to challenge discriminatory practices, but the Act only partially addresses the problems American Indians face in voting. New federal legislation is necessary to address present-day barriers American Indians experience in accessing the ballot box. This Note explores ...


Navajo Nation V. United States Department Of The Interior, Adam W. Johnson 2020 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Navajo Nation V. United States Department Of The Interior, Adam W. Johnson

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Navajo Nation sued the United States government alleging the government breached its trust obligation over the allocation of water rights in the Colorado River Basin. On remand, the district court denied the Navajo Nation leave to file its third amended complaint for futility, holding that the general trust relationship was insufficient to support the Nation’s breach of trust claim.


Customary Law Of Indigenous Communities: Making Space On The Global Environmental Stage, Melissa L. Tatum 2020 University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law

Customary Law Of Indigenous Communities: Making Space On The Global Environmental Stage, Melissa L. Tatum

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

The high stakes often involved in controversies regarding who owns valuable natural resources and who has the authority to regulate environmental contaminants have resulted in fierce legal battles and struggles to establish and define international principles of law. Grand theoretical debates have played out on the international stage regarding the principle of free, prior, and informed consent and the legal contours of corporate social responsibility. Meanwhile, often under the radar, Indigenous people around the world have worked to create a sustained niche for their community and culture in the face of exploitation and environmental devastation at the hands of the ...


Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack M. Beermann 2020 William & Mary Law School

Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack M. Beermann

William & Mary Law Review

Every moment in human history can be characterized by someone as “socially and politically charged.” For a large portion of the population of the United States, nearly the entire history of the country has been socially and politically charged, first because they were enslaved and then because they were subjected to discriminatory laws and unequal treatment under what became known as “Jim Crow.” The history of the United States has also been a period of social and political upheaval for American Indians, the people who occupied the territory that became the United States before European settlement. Although both African-Americans and ...


Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack Beermann 2020 Boston Univeristy School of Law

Crisis? Whose Crisis?, Jack Beermann

Faculty Scholarship

Every moment in human history can be characterized by someone as “socially and politically charged.” For a large portion of the population of the United States, nearly the entire history of the country has been socially and politically charged, first because they were enslaved and then because they were subjected to discriminatory laws and unequal treatment under what became known as “Jim Crow.” The history of the United States has also been a period of social and political upheaval for American Indians, the people who occupied the territory that became the United States before European settlement. Although both African-Americans and ...


Preview—United States Forest Service V. Cowpasture River Preservation Association: Can The Pipeline Cross The Trail?, Alizabeth Bronsdon 2020 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Preview—United States Forest Service V. Cowpasture River Preservation Association: Can The Pipeline Cross The Trail?, Alizabeth Bronsdon

Public Land & Resources Law Review

The Supreme Court of the United States will hear oral argument in this matter on Monday, February 24, 2020, at 10 a.m. in the Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C. Anthony Yang, Assistant to the Solicitor General, will likely argue for the United States. In a divided oral argument, Paul D. Clement will likely appear for Atlantic Coast Pipeline, LLC, the petitioner in consolidated case No. 18-1587, Atlantic Coast Pipeline, LLC v. Cowpasture River Preservation Association. Michael K. Kellogg will likely appear for the Respondents.


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