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1710 full-text articles. Page 1 of 33.

Family Violence In Kuujjuaq: Interviews With Kuujjuamiut, Susan G. Drummond 2016 Osgoode Hall Law School of York University

Family Violence In Kuujjuaq: Interviews With Kuujjuamiut, Susan G. Drummond

Susan G. Drummond

No abstract provided.


Emulsified Property, Jessica A. Shoemaker 2016 Pepperdine University

Emulsified Property, Jessica A. Shoemaker

Pepperdine Law Review

The typical American Indian reservation is often described as a “checkerboard” of different real property ownership forms. Individual parcels of reservation land may be held in either a special federal Indian trust status or in fee, by either Indian or non-Indian owners. The general jurisdictional framework provides that federal and sometimes tribal law sets the rights and responsibilities of trust owners, while fee owners are subject to a peculiar mix of state and tribal law. Many scholars have analyzed the challenges created by this checkerboard pattern of property and jurisdiction. This Article, however, reveals an even more complicated issue that ...


Agenda: Coping With Water Scarcity In River Basins Worldwide: Lessons Learned From Shared Experiences, University of Colorado Boulder. Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment 2016 University of Colorado Law School

Agenda: Coping With Water Scarcity In River Basins Worldwide: Lessons Learned From Shared Experiences, University Of Colorado Boulder. Getches-Wilkinson Center For Natural Resources, Energy, And The Environment

Coping with Water Scarcity in River Basins Worldwide: Lessons Learned from Shared Experiences (Martz Summer Conference, June 9-10)

Water scarcity is increasingly dominating headlines throughout the world. In the southwestern USA, the looming water shortages on the Colorado River system and the unprecedented drought in California are garnering the greatest attention. Similar stories of scarcity and crisis can be found across the globe, suggesting an opportunity for sharing lessons and innovations. For example, the Colorado River and Australia's Murray-Darling Basin likely can share many lessons, as both systems were over-allocated, feature multiple jurisdictions, face similar climatic risks and drought stresses, and struggle to balance human demands with environmental needs. In this conference we cast our net broadly ...


Looking To The Third Sovereign: Tribal Environmental Ethics As An Alternative Paradigm, Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner 2016 Tribal Law and Government Center

Looking To The Third Sovereign: Tribal Environmental Ethics As An Alternative Paradigm, Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner

Pace Environmental Law Review

This article considers what role, if any, can tribal environmental ethics play in the re-examination and consideration of American environmental ethics? The answer—quite a substantial role. Tribes must straddle two worlds—a traditional one and one dominated by Western culture and values. As a result of this dichotomy, tribes are necessarily experts at adaptation and innovation. To demonstrate the value of looking to tribal environmental ethics when considering alternative ethical paradigms for the United States, this article begins by discussing the link between environmental ethics and policy making. With this understanding in place, the article then examines the importance ...


What Should Tribes Expect From Federal Regulations? The Bureau Of Land Management’S Fracking Rule And The Problems With Treating Indian And Federal Lands Identically, Monte Mills 2016 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

What Should Tribes Expect From Federal Regulations? The Bureau Of Land Management’S Fracking Rule And The Problems With Treating Indian And Federal Lands Identically, Monte Mills

Public Land and Resources Law Review

The federal government’s various Indian policies create a number of boundaries across which Indian tribes must negotiate to ensure successful management of their natural resources. For example, the removal, reservation, and treaty-making period of the late 18th and early 19th Centuries created territorial boundaries that, for many tribes, did not align with their traditional homelands. Thereafter, allotment of many of the resulting tribal reservations decimated the tribal land base and left a checkerboard ownership pattern of land within many reservations. More recent decisions of the United States Supreme Court have limited tribal authority over the non-Indian owned squares on ...


Protecting Traditional Water Resources: Legal Options For Preserving Tribal Non-Consumptive Water Use, Julia Guarino 2016 University of Colorado Law School

Protecting Traditional Water Resources: Legal Options For Preserving Tribal Non-Consumptive Water Use, Julia Guarino

Public Land and Resources Law Review

The law governing the quantification and use of tribal water rights is complex and inconsistent, creating major challenges for tribes working to gain control over and make use of their water resources. There are even greater challenges a tribe must overcome if it wishes to safeguard non- consumptive water uses not generally protected under Western water law regimes. Non-consumptive water uses include any use that does not require removing water from the natural water body. Such uses include protecting in-stream water flows for fisheries, riparian habitat, traditional plants, ceremonial uses, or recreation. There are legal tools available to tribes, however ...


“Salmon Is Culture, And Culture Is Salmon”: Reexamining The Implied Right To Habitat Protection As A Tool For Cultural And Ecological Preservation, Wesley J. Furlong 2016 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

“Salmon Is Culture, And Culture Is Salmon”: Reexamining The Implied Right To Habitat Protection As A Tool For Cultural And Ecological Preservation, Wesley J. Furlong

Public Land and Resources Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Sacred Responsibility: Governing The Use Of Water And Related Resources In The International Columbia Basin Through The Prism Of Tribes And First Nations, Matthew J. McKinney, Richard Kyle Paisley, Molly Smith Stenovec 2016 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

A Sacred Responsibility: Governing The Use Of Water And Related Resources In The International Columbia Basin Through The Prism Of Tribes And First Nations, Matthew J. Mckinney, Richard Kyle Paisley, Molly Smith Stenovec

Public Land and Resources Law Review

In the fall of 2012, leaders from Columbia Basin First Nations and tribes participated, along with about 150 other people, in the 4th transboundary symposium convened by the Universities Consortium on Columbia River Governance. Gathered on the shores of Flathead Lake in Polson, Montana, the participants explored the interests, rights, roles, and responsibilities of indigenous people in the international Columbia River Basin. This symposium generated two notable outcomes: first, The Columbia River Basin: A Sense of the Future—a synthesis of interests and concerns with regard to the future of the transboundary river basin as captured by the Universities Consortium ...


A Tiny Fish And A Big Problem: Natives, Elvers, And The Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act Of 1980, John Sanders 2016 College of William & Mary Law School

A Tiny Fish And A Big Problem: Natives, Elvers, And The Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act Of 1980, John Sanders

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Abraham Lincoln And The Dakota War In Academic And Popular Literature, Larry D. Mansch 2016 University of Montana

Abraham Lincoln And The Dakota War In Academic And Popular Literature, Larry D. Mansch

Madison Historical Review

While the Civil War all but consumed Abraham Lincoln’s presidency, at least one other military matter caught his attention. The 1862 Dakota War in Minnesota resulted in the deaths of 358 white settlers, 106 United States soldiers, and 29 Dakota warriors. When the fighting ended hundreds of Indians were placed in prisoner camps, and after sham trials nearly 400 warriors were sentenced to death. Military leaders, politicians, and an enraged citizenry demanded that Lincoln order swift executions. Seeking to balance a sense of justice against the public’s insistence for revenge, Lincoln examined the trial records of each of ...


In Her Words: Recognizing And Preventing Abusive Litigation Against Domestic Violence Survivors, David Ward 2016 Seattle University School of Law

In Her Words: Recognizing And Preventing Abusive Litigation Against Domestic Violence Survivors, David Ward

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Don’T Risk It; Wait Until She’S Sober, Patrick John White 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Don’T Risk It; Wait Until She’S Sober, Patrick John White

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Let’S Talk About Sex: A Call For Guardianship Reform In Washington State, Sage Graves 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Let’S Talk About Sex: A Call For Guardianship Reform In Washington State, Sage Graves

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Let’S Invest In People, Not Prisons: How Washington State Should Address Its Ex-Offender Unemployment Rate, Sara Taboada 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Let’S Invest In People, Not Prisons: How Washington State Should Address Its Ex-Offender Unemployment Rate, Sara Taboada

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


His Feminist Facade: The Neoliberal Co-Option Of The Feminist Movement, Anjilee Dodge, Myani Gilbert 2016 Seattle University School of Law

His Feminist Facade: The Neoliberal Co-Option Of The Feminist Movement, Anjilee Dodge, Myani Gilbert

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Prostitution Policy: Legalization, Decriminalization And The Nordic Model, Ane Mathieson, Easton Branam, Anya Noble 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Prostitution Policy: Legalization, Decriminalization And The Nordic Model, Ane Mathieson, Easton Branam, Anya Noble

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Living Under The Boot: Militarization And Peaceful Protest, Charlotte Guerra 2016 Seattle University School of Law

Living Under The Boot: Militarization And Peaceful Protest, Charlotte Guerra

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Persistence And Resistance: Women’S Leadership And Ending Gender-Based Violence In Guatemala, Serena Cosgrove, Kristi Lee 2016 Seattle University

Persistence And Resistance: Women’S Leadership And Ending Gender-Based Violence In Guatemala, Serena Cosgrove, Kristi Lee

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Mauna Kea Anaina Hou V. Board Of Land And Natural Resources, Wesley J. Furlong 2016 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Mauna Kea Anaina Hou V. Board Of Land And Natural Resources, Wesley J. Furlong

Public Land and Resources Law Review

Native Hawaiians and the scientific community have been pitted against each other in a decades-long culture war over the construction of observatories and telescopes on sacred landscapes. In Mauna Kea Anaina Hou, the Hawai’i Supreme Court handed a victory to Native Hawaiian culture and rights by halting the construction of a new telescope on Mauna Kea. The decision must be read cautiously, however, as it is firmly rooted in the strict application of procedural due process.


Mediating Our Future: The Role Of The Land Buy-Back Program In Rebuilding Confidence And Strengthening Trust Between Tribal Nations And The United States Government, BrieAnn West 2016 Pepperdine University

Mediating Our Future: The Role Of The Land Buy-Back Program In Rebuilding Confidence And Strengthening Trust Between Tribal Nations And The United States Government, Brieann West

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

The role that government regulatory agencies like the Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs played in enforcing Native American land leasing and land rights issues has changed substantially over the past five years. Current changes include, empowering American Indian tribes to exercise autonomy over tribal land leases, and the introduction of the Land Buy-Back program. Despite these positive strides, several questions remain; including, how reuniting previously divided allotments of land and placing them in trust will impact the current trust relationship? Should tribes have more say over which fractionated land allotments receive purchase offers and how these lands will ...


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