Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Immigration Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

3021 Full-Text Articles 1969 Authors 962160 Downloads 156 Institutions

All Articles in Immigration Law

Faceted Search

3021 full-text articles. Page 94 of 94.

Pro Bono In Action: An Immigrant's Need For Representation, Jill E. Family 2009 Widener Law

Pro Bono In Action: An Immigrant's Need For Representation, Jill E. Family

Jill E. Family

Legal representation always matters, but the need for representation intensifies when the most basic rights are at
stake. In immigration removal (deportation) cases, the federal government adjudicates whether an individual may
live and work in the United States, or whether that person must relocate to another country. Reasons for wanting
to be in the United States vary, from a desire to remain with family to a fear for one's life in a home country. In these immigration proceedings, an executive branch employee, an immigration judge, applies the Immigration and Nationality Act, a body of statutes long recognized to rival ...


Exhaustion Of Administrative Remedies In Immigration Cases: Finding Jurisdiction To Review Unexhausted Claims The Board Of Immigration Appeals Considers Sua Sponte On The Merits, Larry R. Fleurantin 2009 Larry R. Fleurantin & Associates, P.A.

Exhaustion Of Administrative Remedies In Immigration Cases: Finding Jurisdiction To Review Unexhausted Claims The Board Of Immigration Appeals Considers Sua Sponte On The Merits, Larry R. Fleurantin

Larry R. Fleurantin

In order for an appellate court to review an agency action, the action must be final and all administrative remedies must be exhausted. With regard to the exhaustion requirement, the author examines how the majority of circuits have held that federal circuit courts have jurisdiction to review immigration claims considered sua sponte by the Board of Immigration Appeals. However, the Eleventh Circuit seems to be the one outlier finding no jurisdiction, and the author believes the holding in Amaya-Artunduaga v. United States Attorney General to be incorrect and recommends it be overruled


Welcoming Women: Recent Changes In U.S. Asylum Law, Jillian Blake 2009 University of Michigan Law School

Welcoming Women: Recent Changes In U.S. Asylum Law, Jillian Blake

Jillian Blake

No abstract provided.


The Rise And Fall Of Employer Sanctions, David Bacon, Bill Ong Hing 2009 University of San Francisco

The Rise And Fall Of Employer Sanctions, David Bacon, Bill Ong Hing

Bill Ong Hing

Workplace Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids by gun-wielding agents resulting in the mass arrests of dozens and sometimes hundreds of employees that were common under the George W. Bush administration appear to have ceased under the Obama administration. Legally questionable mass arrests in neighborhoods continue to occur in neighborhoods under the pretext of serving warrants on criminal aliens. However, disruptive, high-profile worksite raids appear to have subsided. Instead, the Obama administration has engaged in "silent raids" or audits of companies' records by federal agents that have resulted in the firing of thousands of undocumented workers. the administration defends these ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress