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Christian Realism And Immigration Reform, Victor C. Romero 2010 Penn State Law

Christian Realism And Immigration Reform, Victor C. Romero

Journal Articles

Drawing upon President Barack Obama’s admiration of Reinhold Niebuhr’s work, this Essay outlines a Protestant, Christian realist approach toward immigration policy, with specific focus on the role of the executive in providing providential leadership. Embracing realism in its political, moral, and theological dimensions, Christian realism offers a pragmatic, yet optimistic, alternative to secular liberalism’s faith in reason by striving instead to adhere to God’s guidance on matters, taking into account the fundamentally flawed nature of man. The specific policy prescriptions described here mirror the twin virtues of Christian realism by promoting the hope in pursuit of ...


Exhaustion Of Administrative Remedies In Immigration Cases: Finding Jurisdiction To Review Unexhausted Claims The Board Of Immigration Appeals Considers Sua Sponte On The Merits, Larry R. Fleurantin 2010 Larry R. Fleurantin & Associates, P.A.

Exhaustion Of Administrative Remedies In Immigration Cases: Finding Jurisdiction To Review Unexhausted Claims The Board Of Immigration Appeals Considers Sua Sponte On The Merits, Larry R. Fleurantin

Larry R. Fleurantin

In order for an appellate court to review an agency action, the action must be final and all administrative remedies must be exhausted. With regard to the exhaustion requirement, the author examines how the majority of circuits have held that federal circuit courts have jurisdiction to review immigration claims considered sua sponte by the Board of Immigration Appeals. However, the Eleventh Circuit seems to be the one outlier finding no jurisdiction, and the author believes the holding in Amaya-Artunduaga v. United States Attorney General to be incorrect and recommends it be overruled


Refugee Credibility Assessment And The “Religious Imposter” Problem, Michael Kagan 2010 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Refugee Credibility Assessment And The “Religious Imposter” Problem, Michael Kagan

Scholarly Works

Credibility assessment in refugee status determination (RSD) poses unique challenges when the outcome of asylum applications turns on the question of whether an asylum seeker is actually a member of a persecuted religious minority. These cases require secular adjudicators to delve into matters of religious identity and faith that are, by their nature, subjective and beyond the realm of objective analysis. This Article explores practical means of addressing this challenge through a case study of the RSD interviews of Eritrean asylum seekers in Egypt who based their refugee claims on Pentecostal religious associations. Analysis of the interview methods used in ...


The Meaning Of Marriage: Immigration Rules And Their Implications For Same-Sex Spouses In A World Without Doma, Scott Titshaw 2010 Mercer University School of Law

The Meaning Of Marriage: Immigration Rules And Their Implications For Same-Sex Spouses In A World Without Doma, Scott Titshaw

Scott Titshaw

An estimated 35,000 U.S. Citizens are living in our country with same-sex foreign partners, but with no right to stay here together on the basis of their relationship. Many are faced with a choice between their partners and the country they love. This is true, even if the couple is legally married in one of the growing number of states and foreign countries that recognize same-sex marriage. The Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which defines “marriage” under all federal law as an exclusively heterosexual institution, now stands squarely in their way. Reform options that would help these couples ...


Sorry Ma'am, Your Baby Is An Alien: Outdated Immigration Rules And Assisted Reproductive Technology, Scott Titshaw 2010 Mercer University School of Law

Sorry Ma'am, Your Baby Is An Alien: Outdated Immigration Rules And Assisted Reproductive Technology, Scott Titshaw

Scott Titshaw

The growing use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and legal recognition of same-sex relationships are raising questions regarding the recognition of parent-child relationships. State and foreign family law have been wrestling with these issues for decades, but U.S. immigration law is lagging far behind. So far, guidance exists on only one ART related issue under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA): whether a U.S. citizen transmits her citizenship to a child born abroad. Unfortunately, that guidance is contradictory. The U.S. Department of State (DOS) requires genetic kinship for citizenship transmission. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals focuses ...


Fifth Colloquium On Challenges In International Refugee Law. The Michigan Guidelines On The Right To Work., Penelope Mathew 2010 Australian National University

Fifth Colloquium On Challenges In International Refugee Law. The Michigan Guidelines On The Right To Work., Penelope Mathew

Michigan Journal of International Law

An Explanatory Note covering the Fifth Michigan Colloquium on Challenges in International Refugee Law and the Right to Work.


The Michigan Guidelines On The Right To Work, 2010 University of Michigan Law School

The Michigan Guidelines On The Right To Work

Michigan Journal of International Law

The right to work is fundamental to human dignity. It is central to survival and development of the human personality. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), decent work "sums up the aspirations of people in their working lives-for opportunity and income; rights, voice and recognition ..." Work is interrelated, interdependent with, and indivisible from the rights to life, equality, the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, an adequate standard of living, the right to social security and/or social assistance, freedom of movement, freedom of association, and the rights to privacy and family life, among others.


Labour Trafficking: Prosecutions And Other Proceedings, Fiona M. David Ms 2010 Centre for International and Public Law, Australian National University

Labour Trafficking: Prosecutions And Other Proceedings, Fiona M. David Ms

Fiona David

In Australia, three defendants in two cases have been charged and prosecuted for ‘slavery’ or ’trafficking in persons’ under the Criminal Code (Cth), in circumstances where the crimes have allegedly occurred in contexts other than the sex industry. These cases tend to be described as instances of ‘labour trafficking’, even though the parameters of this phrase are far from settled (see further AIC 2009). This brief describes the progression of these two cases through the Australian court system, with varying outcomes.


Migrant Smuggling And Human Rights - Notes From The Field, Fiona M. David Ms 2010 Centre for International and Public Law, Australian National University

Migrant Smuggling And Human Rights - Notes From The Field, Fiona M. David Ms

Fiona David

Eastern Africa is one of the poorest, most conflict-riddled regions in the world and, within this region, migrant smuggling between countries is commonplace. The following article by Fiona David, a lawyer and researcher in smuggling and trafficking issues, seeks to provide some insights into the drivers and realities of migrant smuggling, and the human rights implications of this trade in human misery.


Building The Infrastructure Of Anti-Trafficking: Information, Funding, Responses, Fiona M. David Ms 2010 Centre for International and Public Law, Australian National University

Building The Infrastructure Of Anti-Trafficking: Information, Funding, Responses, Fiona M. David Ms

Fiona David

No abstract provided.


Labour Trafficking: Key Concepts And Issues, Fiona M. David Ms 2010 Centre for International and Public Law, Australian National University

Labour Trafficking: Key Concepts And Issues, Fiona M. David Ms

Fiona David

At the international level, there is no single, clear definition of ‘labour trafficking’. Arguably, the expression can be used to describe those forms of trafficking in persons of which the exploitative purpose relates to a person’s labour. There are, however, debates over the scope and meaning of these terms. This brief provides an introduction to key terms and notes some of the issues that remain less settled.


The Unintended Consequences Of Low H-1b Visa Caps: Brain Blocking, Brain Diversion, And Racial Discrimination Against Asian Technology Professionals, Jeffrey L. Gower 2010 University at Buffalo - SUNY

The Unintended Consequences Of Low H-1b Visa Caps: Brain Blocking, Brain Diversion, And Racial Discrimination Against Asian Technology Professionals, Jeffrey L. Gower

Jeffrey L Gower

American business interests face increasing difficulties as they attempt to compete against global technology-based industries. As the U.S. educational system produces interests face increasing difficulties as they attempt to compete fewer technology workers, many firms look to foreign countries such as India, China, or other Asian countries that have an abundance of skilled professionals. The U.S. Congress created the H-1B visa program in 1990 for educated skilled foreign workers, and manipulated the yearly cap on several occasions. Limits were as high as 195,000 as recently as 2003, but were reduced to 65,000 by 2009. The result ...


Why Human Rights Fail To Protect Undocumented Migrants, Gregor Noll 2010 Lund University, Faculty of Law

Why Human Rights Fail To Protect Undocumented Migrants, Gregor Noll

Gregor Noll

In this article, I depart from the factual difficulties of undocumented migrants to access a state’s protection mechanisms for avowedly universal human rights. I relate this aporia to two competing conceptions of territorial jurisdictions. Drawing on the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Migrant Workers Convention, I separate the sphere of the political community (the polis) and that of the household (the oikos) in developing a political theory of undocumented migration. It rests two central tenets: one is a tributary transaction between sending state and host state, in the course of which the undocumented migrant worker ...


The Legal Production Of The Transgressive Family: Binational Family Relationships Between Cuba And The United States, 2010 SelectedWorks

The Legal Production Of The Transgressive Family: Binational Family Relationships Between Cuba And The United States

Deborah M. Weissman

The Cuban revolution of 1959 both challenged U.S. interests and precipitated one of the largest migration to the United States. By the end of the twentieth century, more than one million Cubans, one-tenth of the total population, had emigrated, mostly to the United States. Family relations developed within two phases of specific global contexts, reflecting Cuba's changing international position and the U.S. response. The first occurred after 1960, when Cuba aligned itself with the Soviet bloc in the final decades of the Cold War. The second was after 1990, when Cuba adapted to the global economy in ...


The Legal Production Of The Transgressive Family: Binational Family Relationships Between Cuba And The United States, Louis A. Perez Jr 2010 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Legal Production Of The Transgressive Family: Binational Family Relationships Between Cuba And The United States, Louis A. Perez Jr

Deborah M. Weissman

The Cuban revolution of 1959 both challenged U.S. interests and precipitated one of the largest migration to the United States. By the end of the twentieth century, more than one million Cubans, one-tenth of the total population, had emigrated, mostly to the United States. Family relations developed within two phases of specific global contexts, reflecting Cuba's changing international position and the U.S. response. The first occurred after 1960, when Cuba aligned itself with the Soviet bloc in the final decades of the Cold War. The second was after 1990, when Cuba adapted to the global economy in ...


Conference On Privacy And Internet Access To Court Files, Panel Two: Should There Be Remote Public Access To Court Filings In Immigration Cases?, Robert Hinkle, David McCraw, Daniel Kanstroom, Eleanor Acer 2010 Boston College Law School

Conference On Privacy And Internet Access To Court Files, Panel Two: Should There Be Remote Public Access To Court Filings In Immigration Cases?, Robert Hinkle, David Mccraw, Daniel Kanstroom, Eleanor Acer

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


The Veil That Covered France's Eye: The Right To Freedom Of Religion And Equal Treatment In Immigration And Naturalization Proceedings, Kendal Davis 2010 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

The Veil That Covered France's Eye: The Right To Freedom Of Religion And Equal Treatment In Immigration And Naturalization Proceedings, Kendal Davis

Nevada Law Journal

In June 2008, France’s highest administrative court upheld a decision to deny citizenship to a Muslim woman because, essentially, she was ‘not French enough.’ This decision incited both praise and outrage in the international human rights arena regarding considerations such as the right to freedom of religion, gender equality, and citizenship.

This Note examines relevant French domestic law and international human rights instruments, and argues that while immigration and naturalization decisions remain an exercise of broad sovereign powers, the emerging human rights norm to be free from discrimination should apply in naturalization proceedings. Furthermore, despite judicial deference and flexibility ...


“To Remand, Or Not To Remand”: Ventura’S Ordinary Remand Rule And The Evolving Jurisprudence Of Futility, Patrick J. Glen 2010 Georgetown University Law Center

“To Remand, Or Not To Remand”: Ventura’S Ordinary Remand Rule And The Evolving Jurisprudence Of Futility, Patrick J. Glen

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

It is a foundational principle of administrative law that a reviewing court should not dispose of a petition for review or appeal on grounds not relied upon by the agency, and should not reach issues in the first instance not addressed administratively. In such circumstances, there is a strong presumption that the reviewing court should remand the case to the agency for further proceedings rather than reach out to decide the disputed issues. The United States Supreme Court explicitly extended operation of the “ordinary remand rule” to the immigration context in its 2002 decision in INS v. Ventura. Notwithstanding subsequent ...


Lessons Learned, Lessons Lost: Immigration Enforcement's Failed Experiment With Penal Severity, Teresa A. Miller 2010 University at Buffalo School of Law

Lessons Learned, Lessons Lost: Immigration Enforcement's Failed Experiment With Penal Severity, Teresa A. Miller

Journal Articles

This article traces the evolution of “get tough” sentencing and corrections policies that were touted as the solution to a criminal justice system widely viewed as “broken” in the mid-1970s. It draws parallels to the adoption some twenty years later of harsh, punitive policies in the immigration enforcement system to address perceptions that it is similarly “broken,” policies that have embraced the theories, objectives and tools of criminal punishment, and caused the two systems to converge. In discussing the myriad of harms that have resulted from the convergence of these two systems, and the criminal justice system’s recent shift ...


Reform In California's Immigration Enforcement And Immigration Court, Nelson E. Gil 2010 Claremont McKenna College

Reform In California's Immigration Enforcement And Immigration Court, Nelson E. Gil

CMC Senior Theses

According to the Department of Homeland Security, Office of Immigration Statistic, California accounts for approximately 2,600,000 illegal immigrants in 2009. This number represents about 25 percent of the entire estimated illegal immigrant population in the United States, which is roughly 10.8 million. Between 2003 and 2008, the U.S. government removed 1,446,338 noncitizens from the United States. This rise in deportation is a result o the changes that have been enacted by the federal government over the years that transformed the nature of immigration enforcement. This thesis explores the California Immigration Enforcement system from the ...


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