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An Illiberal Union, Sonu Bedi 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

An Illiberal Union, Sonu Bedi

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

This Article breaks new ground by applying the philosophical framework of liberal neutrality (most famously articulated by John Rawls) to the United States Supreme Court’s jurisprudence on marriage. At first blush, the Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges—the culmination of marriage rights—seems to affirm a central principle of liberalism, namely equal access to marriage regardless of sexual orientation. Gays and lesbians can finally take part in an institution that celebrates the union of two committed individuals. But perversely, in its attempt to expand access to marriage, the Court has simultaneously entrenched values that are antithetical to ...


“Indian” As A Political Classification: Reading The Tribe Back Into The Indian Child Welfare Act, Allison Krause Elder 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

“Indian” As A Political Classification: Reading The Tribe Back Into The Indian Child Welfare Act, Allison Krause Elder

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

In the summer of 2018, the Ninth Circuit will consider an appeal from the dismissal of a constitutional challenge to the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). Brought by a conservative think-tank, this case frames the ICWA as race-based legislation, violating equal protection by depriving Indian children of the same procedures as non-Indian children in child custody cases. In reality, the ICWA seeks to protect the interests of tribes, Indian families, and Indian children by establishing special procedures and obligations in Indian child custody cases. On its face, the ICWA is concerned not with the race of children, but with the ...


Litigating Trauma As Disability In American Schools, Taylor N. Mullaney 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Litigating Trauma As Disability In American Schools, Taylor N. Mullaney

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


The Devil You Don’T Know: Implicit Bias Keeps Women In Their Place, Michele N. Struffolino 2018 Nova Southeastern University

The Devil You Don’T Know: Implicit Bias Keeps Women In Their Place, Michele N. Struffolino

Pace Law Review

While men’s claims of gender bias in the family law system are acknowledged, this article focuses on how bias, whether implicit or explicit under the guise of unconscious attitudes or behavior, continues to place women at a systemic disadvantage. Although implicit bias also impacts outcomes in child abuse and neglect actions involving the state, the focus of this article is the impact of implicit bias in actions between women and men in the family courts, in particular those issues involved in the dissolution of the relationship and the family unit. First, the emergence of implicit social cognition theory will ...


Custody Rights Of Same-Sex Couples In The United States V. Chile: More Progress Needed, Isabel Jolicoeur 2018 University of Miami Law School

Custody Rights Of Same-Sex Couples In The United States V. Chile: More Progress Needed, Isabel Jolicoeur

University of Miami Inter-American Law Review

No abstract provided.


Her Belly, Their Baby: A Contract Solution For Surrogacy Agreements, Devon Quinn 2018 Brooklyn Law School

Her Belly, Their Baby: A Contract Solution For Surrogacy Agreements, Devon Quinn

Journal of Law and Policy

The 1986 Baby M case was the first American court ruling regarding the validity of surrogacy. The contentious custody battle between the intended parents and their surrogate highlighted the issues and fears associated with the practice, impacted legislation throughout the United States, and captured national media attention. Since 1986, however, the landscape of the American family has changed -- gay marriage has been legalized in the United States, one in eight American heterosexual couples struggle with fertility issues, women are more likely to wait longer to have children, and developments in technology such as in-vitro fertilization offer new fertility options for ...


Top-Down Or From The Ground?: A Practical Perspective On Reforming The Field Of Children And The Law, Cheryl Bratt 2018 Boston College Law School

Top-Down Or From The Ground?: A Practical Perspective On Reforming The Field Of Children And The Law, Cheryl Bratt

Cheryl S. Bratt

Children get a raw deal in this country at the federal, state, and family levels. The law indisputably treats children in many limiting and paternalistic ways, typically designating them as objects to be controlled either by their parents or the government—two parties perpetually duking it out for authority. In their article, The New Law of the Child, 127 Yale L. J. 1448 (2018), Anne C. Dailey and Laura A. Rosenbury envision overhauling constitutional law to better promote children’s broader interests. Theirs is thus a top-down approach to change: by extending the Constitution to safeguard more robust rights for ...


Unregulated Custody Transfers: Why The Practice Of Rehoming Should Be Considered A Form Of Illegal Adoption And Human Trafficking, Michael D. Aune 2018 University of Georgia School of Law

Unregulated Custody Transfers: Why The Practice Of Rehoming Should Be Considered A Form Of Illegal Adoption And Human Trafficking, Michael D. Aune

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Honoring Professor Bruce Kogan (05-07-2018), Michael M. Bowden 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Honoring Professor Bruce Kogan (05-07-2018), Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Campbell V. Campbell: Requiring Adherence To The Correct Legal Standard In Child Custody Proceedings - The "Best Interest Of The Child", Lisa M. Fitzgibbon 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Campbell V. Campbell: Requiring Adherence To The Correct Legal Standard In Child Custody Proceedings - The "Best Interest Of The Child", Lisa M. Fitzgibbon

Maine Law Review

Should a divorce court be permitted to consider evidence of a parent's misuse of legal process when rendering a child custody decree? In Campbell v. Campbell the Maine Superior Court concluded that Mrs. Campbell had sought an ex parte protection from abuse order against her husband in an effort to gain a tactical advantage in the custody proceeding—she did not need protection from abuse. The court then awarded Mr. Campbell custody of the children, on the basis of Mrs. Campbell's misuse of legal process. Yet, by focusing its attention upon one parent's conduct, the superior court ...


In Search Of A Theory Of Alimony, John C. Sheldon, Nancy Diesel Mills 2018 University of Maine School of Law

In Search Of A Theory Of Alimony, John C. Sheldon, Nancy Diesel Mills

Maine Law Review

Maine's alimony statute is full of good advice. It directs judges who hear requests for alimony to “consider” all kinds of things, from the parties' individual wealth to their individual health, from their respective ages to their respective wages, from the length of their marriage to the strength of their educations. And, as if to subdue any doubt about the breadth of this assignment, the statute then invites judges to take into account “any other factors the court considers appropriate.” In short, the statute grants judges almost unlimited discretion in awarding alimony. Power notwithstanding, however, anyone who reads the ...


In Re: Matter Of E.R. C/W 73198, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 29 (May 3, 2018), Matthew J. McKissick 2018 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

In Re: Matter Of E.R. C/W 73198, 134 Nev. Adv. Op. 29 (May 3, 2018), Matthew J. Mckissick

Nevada Supreme Court Summaries

The Court held that once parental rights have been terminated, NRS 128.110(2) is the appropriate standard for applying the familial placement preference—not NRS 432B.550(5).


Prejudice, Constitutional Moral Progress, And Being “On The Right Side Of History”: Reflections On Loving V. Virginia At Fifty, Linda C. McClain 2018 Boston University School of Law

Prejudice, Constitutional Moral Progress, And Being “On The Right Side Of History”: Reflections On Loving V. Virginia At Fifty, Linda C. Mcclain

Fordham Law Review

Looking back at the record in Loving, this Article shows the role played by narratives of constitutional moral progress, in which the Lovings and their amici indicted Virginia’s antimiscegenation law as an “odious” relic of slavery and a present-day reflection of racial prejudice. In response, Virginia sought to distance such laws from prejudice and white supremacy by appealing to “the most recent” social science that identified problems posed by “intermarriage,” particularly for children. Such work also rejected the idea that intermarriage was a path toward progress and freedom from prejudice. This Article concludes by briefly examining the appeal to ...


Lgbt Equality And Sexual Racism, Russell K. Robinson, David M. Frost 2018 University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

Lgbt Equality And Sexual Racism, Russell K. Robinson, David M. Frost

Fordham Law Review

Bigots such as the trial judge in Loving have long invoked religion to justify discrimination. We agree with other scholars that neither religion nor artistic freedom justifies letting businesses discriminate. However, we also want to make manifest the tension between the public posture of LGBT-rights litigants and the practices of some LGBT people who discriminate based on race in selecting partners. We argue that some white people’s aversion to dating and forming relationships with people of color is a form of racism, and this sexual racism is inconsistent with the spirit of Loving. Part I provides a review of ...


Family Courts As Certifying Agencies: When Family Courts Can Certify U Visa Applications For Survivors Of Intimate Partner Violence, Sylvia Lara Altreuter 2018 Fordham University School of Law

Family Courts As Certifying Agencies: When Family Courts Can Certify U Visa Applications For Survivors Of Intimate Partner Violence, Sylvia Lara Altreuter

Fordham Law Review

Undocumented intimate partner violence survivors living in the UnitedStates have limited options for immigration relief. One of the only avenuesopen to them is the U Visa: a nonimmigrant visa established by the BatteredImmigrant Women Protection Act of 2000. To apply for a U Visa, a survivormust prove to immigration authorities that she was the victim of a crime;suffered substantial abuse; and was, is,or is likely to be helpful in theinvestigation of her abuser. The statute requires that all U Visa applicationsbe certified by an appropriate officialwho testifies to the applicant’shelpfulness with the investigation. This certification is a ...


Enemy And Ally: Religion In Loving V. Virginia And Beyond, Leora F. Eisenstadt 2018 Fox School of Business, Temple University

Enemy And Ally: Religion In Loving V. Virginia And Beyond, Leora F. Eisenstadt

Fordham Law Review

Throughout the Loving case, religion appeared both overtly and subtly to endorse or lend credibility to the arguments against racial mixing. This use of religion is unsurprising given that supporters of slavery, white supremacy, and segregation have, for decades, turned to religion to justify their ideologies. Although these views are no longer mainstream, they have recently appeared again in arguments against same-sex marriage and gay and transgender rights generally. What is remarkable in the Loving case, however, is an alternate use of religion, not to justify white supremacy and segregation but instead to highlight the irrationality of its supporters’ claims ...


Foreword, R.A. Lenhardt, Tanya K. Hernandez, Kimani Paul-Emile 2018 Fordham University School of Law

Foreword, R.A. Lenhardt, Tanya K. Hernandez, Kimani Paul-Emile

Fordham Law Review

This Foreword provides an overview of Fifty Years of Loving v. Virginia and the Continued Pursuit of Racial Equality, a symposium hosted by the Fordham Law Review and cosponsored by the Fordham Law School Center on Race, Law & Justice. Even fifty years later, Loving provides ample foundation for an inquiry into the operation of race and racial inequality in the United States, which touches on the queries outlined above, as well as many others. In our view, a symposium focused on Loving makes a significant contribution by deepening scholarly analysis of that decision and by explicating the kinds of issues ...


The Hope Of Loving And Warping Racial Progress Narratives, Jasmine Mitchell 2018 State University of New York at Old Westbury

The Hope Of Loving And Warping Racial Progress Narratives, Jasmine Mitchell

Fordham Law Review

Loving v. Virginia has been heralded as the catalyst for a “biracial baby boom.” Loving marked the end of the criminalization of miscegenation between nonwhite and white individuals and the automatic illegitimacy of mixed-race children in many states, and it heralded the beginning of the celebration of interracial families as part of a new multiracial, and eventual postracial, era. The construction of whiteness has been tied to the management of interracial sex and marriage, and Loving razed antimiscegenation laws that, in former Chief Justice Earl Warren’s words, had been “designed to maintain White Supremacy.” Today, the media relies on ...


Loving’S Legacy: Decriminalization And The Regulation Of Sex And Sexuality, Melissa Murray 2018 University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

Loving’S Legacy: Decriminalization And The Regulation Of Sex And Sexuality, Melissa Murray

Fordham Law Review

2017 marked the fiftieth anniversary of Loving v. Virginia, the landmark Supreme Court decision that invalidated bans on miscegenation and interracial marriages. In the years since Loving was decided, it remains a subject of intense scholarly debate and attention. The conventional wisdom suggests that the Court’s decision in Loving was hugely transformative— decriminalizing interracial marriages and relationships and removing the most pernicious legal barriers to such couplings. But other developments suggest otherwise. If we shift our lens from marriages to other areas of the law—child custody cases, for example—Loving’s legacy seems less rosy. In the years ...


Residential Segregation And Interracial Marriages, Rose Cuison Villazor 2018 University of California, Davis, School of Law

Residential Segregation And Interracial Marriages, Rose Cuison Villazor

Fordham Law Review

Part I highlights recent data on racially segregated neighborhoods and low rates of interracial marriage to underscore what Russell Robinson refers to as “structural constraints” that shape and limit romantic preferences. As I discuss in this Part, many cities today continue to be racially segregated. Notably, current data demonstrate a strong correlation between low rates of interracial marriage and racially segregated neighborhoods in those cities. By contrast, contemporary studies indicate that in cities where communities are more racially and economically integrated, the rate of interracial marriages is high. Part II argues that the association between high rates of segregation and ...


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