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The Unwritten Rules Of Liberal Democracy, Charles W. Collier 2020 University of Massachusetts School of Law

The Unwritten Rules Of Liberal Democracy, Charles W. Collier

University of Massachusetts Law Review

This Article is set amidst the distinctly unsettled and unsettling state of governmental practices, legislative policy, and presidential politics of contemporary America. Immediacy, too, introduces its own uncertainty—as compared to the comfortable vantage point of the distant future. But, as I shall argue, there is no realistic alternative to beginning in medias res. To address these issues as they inherently demand, the usual precedents and protocols and precautions must be set aside—if they are not already “gone with the wind.”6 Since the 2016 Presidential Election, and even before, threats to liberal democracy have emerged, in plausible form ...


Gerrymandering & Justiciability: The Political Question Doctrine After Rucho V. Common Cause, G. Michael Parsons 2020 New York University School of Law

Gerrymandering & Justiciability: The Political Question Doctrine After Rucho V. Common Cause, G. Michael Parsons

Indiana Law Journal

This Article deconstructs Rucho’s articulation and application of the political question doctrine and makes two contributions. First, the Article disentangles the political question doctrine from neighboring justiciability doctrines. The result is a set of substantive principles that should guide federal courts as they exercise a range of routine judicial functions—remedial, adjudicative, and interpretive. Rather than unrealistically attempting to draw crisp jurisdictional boundaries between exercises of “political” and “judicial” power, the political question doctrine should seek to moderate their inevitable (and frequent) clash. Standing doctrine should continue to guide courts in determining whether they have authority over a case ...


Picking The Lock: A Proposal For A Standard Fee Waiver In Texas For Identification Documents, Gregory Zlotnick 2020 St. Mary's University School of Law

Picking The Lock: A Proposal For A Standard Fee Waiver In Texas For Identification Documents, Gregory Zlotnick

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

Abstract forthcoming.


Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review 2020 Seattle University School of Law

Table Of Contents, Seattle University Law Review

Seattle University Law Review

Table of Contents


Visions Of The Republic Symposium: Voting With The Virus: Ensuring Democracy Via Bypassing The Excuse Requirements In Absentee Voting, Russell Spivak 2020 Harvard Law School

Visions Of The Republic Symposium: Voting With The Virus: Ensuring Democracy Via Bypassing The Excuse Requirements In Absentee Voting, Russell Spivak

Fordham Law Review Online

One of the many difficulties posed by measures undertaken to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic may be an inability to vote. Should this pandemic bleed into the fall, gathering at polling places, for example, would contravene guidelines prohibiting large gatherings particularly in crammed quarters. As such, jurisdictions must act immediately to broaden the use of absentee voting. Unfortunately, seventeen states, either via statute or constitutional provision, presently require an “excuse” to vote absentee. This could theoretically pose a problem insofar as fear of contracting the disease or spreading it to others may or may not qualify. This Article ...


Visions Of The Republic Symposium: State Solutions To State Problems: Using State Constitutions To Fight Voter Suppression, Russell Spivak 2020 Harvard Law School

Visions Of The Republic Symposium: State Solutions To State Problems: Using State Constitutions To Fight Voter Suppression, Russell Spivak

Fordham Law Review Online

Federal action has been undertaken throughout our nation’s history to both quell voter suppression and expand the franchise, countering racist state efforts to restrict the vote. In the face of shrinking federal solutions, those seeking to protect the vote must look for new methods. This Article proposes that advocates look more deeply at state constitutional law and pursue claims in state court to vindicate voting rights, as state constitutional provisions and precedent may provide fertile ground. In advancing this argument, the Article swiftly reviews the history of the federal government’s actions to protect voting throughout our nation’s ...


Visions Of The Republic Symposium: The People: A Pre-Primer For Critically Reevaluating Representation & Court Power In The Present, Marvin L. Astrada 2020 New York University Washington D.C.

Visions Of The Republic Symposium: The People: A Pre-Primer For Critically Reevaluating Representation & Court Power In The Present, Marvin L. Astrada

Fordham Law Review Online

What exactly is an American? Who or what are the People? Is there an authentic, viable American political identity or community? Or do the deep ruptures and balkanization that seem to pervade law and politics— ranging from pandemics, national security, impeachment, and the environment, to issues of an everyday, local nature—indicate a crisis of legitimacy, cohesion, and national community?


Democracy, Deference, And Compromise: Understanding And Reforming Campaign Finance Jurisprudence, Scott P. Bloomberg 2020 University of Maine School of Law

Democracy, Deference, And Compromise: Understanding And Reforming Campaign Finance Jurisprudence, Scott P. Bloomberg

Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review

In Citizens United, the Supreme Court interpreted the government’s interest in preventing corruption as being limited to preventing quid pro quo— cash-for-votes—corruption. This narrow interpretation drastically circumscribed legislatures’ abilities to regulate the financing of elections, in turn prompting scholars to propose a number of reforms for broadening the government interest in campaign finance cases. These reforms include urging the Court to recognize a new government interest such as political equality, to adopt a broader understanding of corruption, and to be more deferential to legislatures in defining corruption.

Building upon that body of scholarship, this Article begins with a ...


Voting By Mail: Issues And Resources, Virginia A. Neisler 2020 University of Michigan Law School

Voting By Mail: Issues And Resources, Virginia A. Neisler

Law Librarian Scholarship

As the world navigates the worst pandemic in living memory, America has been faced with the prospect of holding a federal presidential election amid a public health crisis. In the spring of 2020, when the coronavirus began to spread rapidly in the United States, election officials in many states opted to extend absentee voting deadlines or postpone elections altogether to reduce the risk of disease transmission. In anticipation of a resurgence of COVID-19 in the fall, the scheduled November election has caused concern for many officials who have searched for potential solutions to make the upcoming presidential election safer.


The Death Of Non-Resident Contribution Limit Bans And The Birth Of The New Small, Swing State, George J. Somi 2020 William & Mary Law School

The Death Of Non-Resident Contribution Limit Bans And The Birth Of The New Small, Swing State, George J. Somi

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District race in 2018 featured an eye-popping number: 96.7. That figure represents the percentage of candidate Maura Sullivan’s individual contributions derived from out-of-state, non–New Hampshire donors. In August 2018, of the $1.37 million USD of individual contributions that Sullivan had raised, only 3.3%—$46,648 USD—originated from in-state contributors. Sullivan had received individual donations amounting to $497,405 USD from Boston, $216,359 USD from New York City, $101,562 USD from the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, and $92,371 USD from San Francisco.

In nearby Maine, campaign ...


Women's Quotas: Making The Case For Codifying Syrian Women's Political Participation, Jomana Qaddour 2020 William & Mary Law School

Women's Quotas: Making The Case For Codifying Syrian Women's Political Participation, Jomana Qaddour

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Changing Face Of Terrorism And The Designation Of Foreign Terrorist Organizations, Patrick J. Keenan 2020 University of Illinois College of Law

The Changing Face Of Terrorism And The Designation Of Foreign Terrorist Organizations, Patrick J. Keenan

Indiana Law Journal

In this Article, I take up one slice of what should be a broad re-examination of

U.S. law and policy. I argue that the new attacks have been undertaken by entities

that can and should be designated as foreign terrorist organizations. Doing this would

permit prosecutors to target those who support these entities with tools that are not

currently available. This Article is both a doctrinal argument that directly addresses

the many legal hurdles that make designating groups, such as foreign hackers and

troll farms, terrorist organizations a complicated endeavor, and a policy argument

about how U.S. law ...


Thin And Thick Conceptions Of The Nineteenth Amendment Right To Vote And Congress's Power To Enforce It, Richard L. Hasen, Leah M. Litman 2020 UC Irvine School of Law

Thin And Thick Conceptions Of The Nineteenth Amendment Right To Vote And Congress's Power To Enforce It, Richard L. Hasen, Leah M. Litman

Articles

This Article, prepared for a Georgetown Law Journal symposium on the Nineteenth Amendment’s one-hundred-year anniversary, explores and defends a “thick” conception of the Nineteenth Amendment right to vote and Congress’s power to enforce it. A “thin” conception of the Nineteenth Amendment maintains that the Amendment merely prohibits states from enacting laws that prohibit women from voting once the state decides to hold an election. And a “thin” conception of Congress’s power to enforce the Nineteenth Amendment maintains that Congress may only supply remedies for official acts that violate the Amendment’s substantive guarantees. This Article argues the ...


How Single-Candidate Super Pacs Changed The Game And How To Change It Back: Adopting A Presumption Of Coordination And Fixing The Fec’S Gridlock, Sarah E. Adams 2020 Brooklyn Law School

How Single-Candidate Super Pacs Changed The Game And How To Change It Back: Adopting A Presumption Of Coordination And Fixing The Fec’S Gridlock, Sarah E. Adams

Brooklyn Law Review

A series of Supreme Court decisions chipping away at campaign finance regulations, particularly the regulation of expenditure-only groups, has resulted in a proliferation of single-candidate Super PACs. While purportedly independent of the candidate, in reality, single-candidate Super PACs operate as an extension of the candidate’s own campaign team. This note argues that single-candidate Super PACs, now operating as fundamental extensions of candidates’ campaigns, pose quid pro quo corruption risks by acting as surrogates for donors who have maxed out on contributions made directly to a candidate. This note will prove that curbing the proliferation of candidate Super PAC coordination ...


The Vra At A Crossroads: The Ability Of Section 2 To Address Discriminatory Districting On The Eve Of The 2020 Census, Ben Boris 2020 Notre Dame Law School

The Vra At A Crossroads: The Ability Of Section 2 To Address Discriminatory Districting On The Eve Of The 2020 Census, Ben Boris

Notre Dame Law Review

Part I of this Note begins by examining the background of the VRA. In Part I, this Note will briefly summarize the Act’s relationship with the Fifteenth Amendment and the circumstances that prompted its enactment, and detail the development of both section 2 and section 5 of the Act, as they have been used to combat vote discrimination. Part I will also discuss recent Supreme Court decisions that have limited the strength of the Act and set the stage for an analysis of the Act’s inability to combat discriminatory districting.

Part II will highlight two shortcomings of the ...


Not Gill-Ty: Challenging And Providing A Workable Alternative To The Supreme Court's Gerrymandering Standing Analysis In Gill V. Whitford, Colin Neal 2020 William & Mary Law School

Not Gill-Ty: Challenging And Providing A Workable Alternative To The Supreme Court's Gerrymandering Standing Analysis In Gill V. Whitford, Colin Neal

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


A New Old Solution: Why The United States Should Vote By Mail-In Ballot, Annie Barouh 2020 Seattle University School of Law

A New Old Solution: Why The United States Should Vote By Mail-In Ballot, Annie Barouh

Seattle Journal for Social Justice

No abstract provided.


Constitutionalism And Africa's Agenda 2063: How To Build "The Africa We Want", John Mukum Mbaku 2020 Brooklyn Law School

Constitutionalism And Africa's Agenda 2063: How To Build "The Africa We Want", John Mukum Mbaku

Brooklyn Journal of International Law

In 2013, Africans, under the leadership of the African Union, set out to develop a “strategic framework for the socio-economic transformation of the continent over the next 50 years.” This new development program was expected to “accelerate the implementation of past and existing continental initiatives for growth and sustainable development.” This transformative program, called Agenda 2063: The Africa We Want, was officially adopted by the Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the African Union in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in January 2015. The heart of this ambitious development initiative are seven aspirations, which Africans hope to achieve by the ...


A Narrowly-Tailored, Technical Disenfranchisement: Risking Death To Vote Amidst A Viral Pandemic, Athena Hernandez 2020 Golden Gate University School of Law

A Narrowly-Tailored, Technical Disenfranchisement: Risking Death To Vote Amidst A Viral Pandemic, Athena Hernandez

GGU Law Review Blog

In what has been referred to as a tragedy for American democracy and one of the most egregious examples of voter suppression in history, a United States Supreme Court ruling on April 6th made it harder for citizens of Wisconsin to cast their votes amidst the coronavirus pandemic.


The Legal History Of State Legislative Vacancies And Temporary Appointments, Tyler Yeargain 2020 Brooklyn Law School

The Legal History Of State Legislative Vacancies And Temporary Appointments, Tyler Yeargain

Journal of Law and Policy

We love paying attention to special elections. They operate as catharsis for opposition parties and activists, easily serve as proxies for how well the governing party is doing, and are ripe for over-extrapolation by prognosticators. But in thirty states and territories throughout the United States, state legislative vacancies are filled by a combination of special elections and temporary appointments. These appointment systems are rarely studied or discussed in academic literature but have a fascinating legal history that dates back to pre-Revolutionary America. They have substantially changed in the last four centuries, transitioning from a system that, like the Electoral College ...


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