Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Dispute Resolution and Arbitration Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

5,554 Full-Text Articles 3,786 Authors 2,581,361 Downloads 128 Institutions

All Articles in Dispute Resolution and Arbitration

Faceted Search

5,554 full-text articles. Page 142 of 142.

Attorneys As Arbitrators, Adam C. Pritchard, Stephen J. Choi, Jill E. Fisch 2010 University of Michigan Law School

Attorneys As Arbitrators, Adam C. Pritchard, Stephen J. Choi, Jill E. Fisch

Articles

We study the role of attorneys as arbitrators in securities arbitration. We find that arbitrators who also represent brokerage firms or brokers in other arbitrations award significantly less compensation to investor-claimants than do other arbitrators. We find no significant effect for attorney-arbitrators who represent investors or both investors and brokerage firms. The relation between representing brokerage firms and arbitration awards remains significant even when we control for political outlook. Arbitrators who donate money to Democratic political candidates award greater compensation than do arbitrators who donate to Republican can-didates. We also study the dynamics of panel interaction. We find that the ...


Evolving Schizophrenic Nature Of Labor Arbitration, The, Martin H. Malin 2010 University of Missouri School of Law

Evolving Schizophrenic Nature Of Labor Arbitration, The, Martin H. Malin

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Commentators have rightly criticized Pyett for its complete disregard of decades of established precedent. In this article, however, I situate the Pyett decision in the context of an ongoing evolution in labor arbitration as that institution has tried to accommodate the intrusion of public law claims into a private system of workplace self-governance. I suggest that labor arbitration has developed a kind of schizophrenic existence, preserving its role as a substitute for strikes and other workplace strife in a private system of self-governance while accommodating an additional role as a substitute for litigation of public law claims. Nevertheless, I find ...


Holistic Strategy For Coming To Grips With The Creeping Legalism Of Labor Arbitration, A, Stephen L. Hayford 2010 University of Missouri School of Law

Holistic Strategy For Coming To Grips With The Creeping Legalism Of Labor Arbitration, A, Stephen L. Hayford

Journal of Dispute Resolution

The commentary that follows is a call to advocates to take back responsibility for settling the disputes that arise during the life of the collective bargaining agreement by becoming more adept negotiators, able and willing to find and engage the truth and unafraid to lead and make difficult decisions. Only then will the legal machinations and contortions that increasingly plague labor arbitration be rendered unnecessary in most circumstances. I assert that the "creeping legalism" of labor arbitration is a symptom of the too-frequent failure of the contractual grievance procedure to resolve difficult disputes. The conundrum that phenomenon presents can be ...


Mediation In Employment And Creeping Legalism: Implications For Dispute Systems Design, Lisa Blomgren Bingham, Susan Summers Raines, Timothy Hedeen, Lisa Marie Napoli 2010 University of Missouri School of Law

Mediation In Employment And Creeping Legalism: Implications For Dispute Systems Design, Lisa Blomgren Bingham, Susan Summers Raines, Timothy Hedeen, Lisa Marie Napoli

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This article will explore the question of creeping legalism in mediation of statutory disputes arising out of employment. First, it will briefly review the issue of creeping legalism in arbitration. Second, it will introduce dispute systems design (DSD). Third, it will review the analogous debate on legalism in mediation in three design contexts: evaluative mediation of employment disputes in the court-connected setting, grievance mediation embedded in the collective bargaining agreement, and transformative mediation of employment disputes in the United States Postal Service's (USPS's) REDRESS program. Most employees do not face a choice among mediation models; instead, they choose ...


Effect Of Shari'a On The Dispute Resolution Process Set Forth In The Washington Convention, The, Andrew Smolik 2010 University of Missouri School of Law

Effect Of Shari'a On The Dispute Resolution Process Set Forth In The Washington Convention, The, Andrew Smolik

Journal of Dispute Resolution

This article will provide an overview of Shari'a law with respect to arbitration. Section I provides an overview of principles of Shari'a and its development. Section II discusses Islamic jurisprudence and the different schools of Islamic jurisprudence. Section III provides a discussion of the different schools of Islamic jurisprudence. Section IV provides a history of arbitration in the Middle East from the period before Muhammad to today. Section V gives a brief overview of the Convention on the Settlement of Investment Disputes between States and Nationals of Other States (ICSID Convention). Sections VI and VI discuss issues regarding ...


All Bound Up With No Place To Go: A Lack Of Individual Alternatives To Binding Arbitration Provisions For Statutory Claims, Matthew Gierse 2010 University of Missouri School of Law

All Bound Up With No Place To Go: A Lack Of Individual Alternatives To Binding Arbitration Provisions For Statutory Claims, Matthew Gierse

Journal of Dispute Resolution

For the greater part of the twentieth century, arbitration has played a large role in resolving disputes between unions representing employees and employers. However, during the past few decades, these employment contracts began to incorporate mandatory arbitration agreements for statutory discrimination claims, with at least one-fifth of all employees presently subject to mandatory arbitration. During this same period, courts began to broaden the ability of employees to waive their right to a judicial forum for statutory claims; Tewolde v. Owens & Minor Distribution is no exception. In 2009, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled for the first time that a union ...


Third Circuit Buyers Beware: District Court In Litman Holds Unconscionability Defense Contravened By Federal Arbitration Act, David C. Winters 2010 University of Missouri School of Law

Third Circuit Buyers Beware: District Court In Litman Holds Unconscionability Defense Contravened By Federal Arbitration Act, David C. Winters

Journal of Dispute Resolution

Without even knowing it, just about everyone has agreed to settle disputes through arbitration and has waived any rights to proceed on a class-wide basis. While many consumers do not read the fine print in the agreements they sign, a variety of companies, from cell phone providers to car dealers, have consumers agree in sales contracts to arbitrate any claims and to waive the ability to proceed with a class action claim. This was the scenario in the case of Litman v. Cellco Partnership, in which a New Jersey federal district court held that the plaintiff cell phone customers could ...


Making Talk Cheap (And Problems Easy): How Legal And Political Institutions Can Facilitate Consensus, Cheryl Boudreau, Mathew D. McCubbins, Daniel B. Rodriguez, Nicholas Weller 2010 Duke Law School

Making Talk Cheap (And Problems Easy): How Legal And Political Institutions Can Facilitate Consensus, Cheryl Boudreau, Mathew D. Mccubbins, Daniel B. Rodriguez, Nicholas Weller

Faculty Scholarship

In many legal, political, and social settings, people must reach a consensus before particular outcomes can be achieved and failing to reach a consensus may be costly. In this article, we present a theory and conduct experiments that take into account the costs associated with communicating, as well as the difficulty of the decisions that groups make. We find that when there is even a small cost (relative to the potential benefit) associated with sending information to others and/or listening, groups are much less likely to reach a consensus, primarily because they are less willing to communicate with one ...


Mediation As An Effective Method To Transform Relationships And Resolve Conflict, Julie R. Kneip 2010 University of Northern Iowa

Mediation As An Effective Method To Transform Relationships And Resolve Conflict, Julie R. Kneip

Graduate Research Papers

Mediation has become a well-respected method of conflict resolution. It is currently utilized in a variety of areas including family situations such as divorce and custody concerns, employer and employee disputes, and individual conflicts. Mediation occurs on a global level as well, including intervention with countries engaged in conflict with one another and countries with governments at odds with their constituents. In the United States, mediation is often seen as a way to lower the burden on the courts by having parties resolve issues with the help of a mediator rather than further clogging the judicial system. While this is ...


The Persistence Of Low Expectations In Special Education Law Viewed Through The Lens Of Therapeutic Jurisprduence, Richard Peterson 2009 Pepperdine University

The Persistence Of Low Expectations In Special Education Law Viewed Through The Lens Of Therapeutic Jurisprduence, Richard Peterson

Richard Peterson

For more than thirty-five years a paradigm of low expectations has infected efforts to educate children with disabilities and has been a persistent and stubborn obstacle to the successful implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and its predecessor, the Education of All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA). This dilemma raises questions addressed in this paper: What is meant by low expectations in the context of Special Education Law? What are the root causes of this phenomenon, and what makes it so resistant to change? How does it impede implementation of the IDEA? And lastly, in what ways does ...


Jurisdiction And Internet In Relation To Commercial Law Disputes In A European Context, Ulf Maunsbach, Patrik Lindskoug 2009 Lund University, Faculty of Law

Jurisdiction And Internet In Relation To Commercial Law Disputes In A European Context, Ulf Maunsbach, Patrik Lindskoug

Ulf Maunsbach

No abstract provided.


Lessons From The Field: First Impressions From Second Generation Negotiation Teaching, Kenneth Fox, Manon Schonewille, Esra Çuhadar-Gürkaynak 2009 Hamline University

Lessons From The Field: First Impressions From Second Generation Negotiation Teaching, Kenneth Fox, Manon Schonewille, Esra Çuhadar-Gürkaynak

Kenneth H Fox

In May, 2008, an international group of 50 negotiation scholars and teachers met in Rome, Italy, to launch a four year project to rethink negotiation theory and pedagogy. From its inception, the Rethinking Negotiation Teaching project (NT 2.0 project) has had two primary goals: to significantly advance our understanding of the negotiation process in all its complexity; and to improve how we teach others about negotiation. The first year of this four-year project focused on generating new ideas and approaches to negotiation scholarship and teaching. Some of this scholarship was published in the book Rethinking Negotiation Teaching and some ...


Reweaving The Fabric Of Society: Restorative Justice In The United States, Kenneth Fox 2009 Hamline University

Reweaving The Fabric Of Society: Restorative Justice In The United States, Kenneth Fox

Kenneth H Fox

This article provides an overview of restorative justice practices in the United States. It offers a brief history of the field, articulates its underlying values, and describes its primary forms of practice. The purpose of this article is to introduce readers to an emerging and important way to re-think how citizens relate to one another and to the “state” when crime occurs.


Setting Aside An Arbitration Award, Fernando Leila 2009 Fordham University

Setting Aside An Arbitration Award, Fernando Leila

Fernando Leila

I - Facts Most arbitration rules stipulate that the arbitral awards that result from arbitration under those agreements or rules are ‘final.’ Yet there is almost always the possibility for a party to challenge the award, whether or not the parties have agreed. According to the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (“UNCITRAL”), a successful challenge will usually result in the award being ‘set aside,’ ‘vacated,’ or’ annulled,’ and therefore ceasing to exist, at least within the jurisdiction of the court setting it aside. To set aside an award means to 'declare the award to be disregarded in whole or ...


Contracting For State Intervention, W. Mark C. Weidemaier 2009 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Contracting For State Intervention, W. Mark C. Weidemaier

W. Mark C. Weidemaier

Most models of contracting behavior assume that contract terms are meant to be enforced, whether through legal or relational means. That assumption extends to dispute resolution terms like arbitration clauses. According to theory, contracting parties adopt arbitration clauses because they want to arbitrate disputes and because they believe that a counter-party who has agreed to arbitrate will keep that promise rather than incur the resulting legal or extra-legal sanction. In this article, I describe how this standard account cannot explain the origins of arbitration clauses in sovereign bond contracts. Drawing on original archival research and secondary sources, the article traces ...


The Missing Link Of Democracy, Fernando Leila 2009 Fordham University

The Missing Link Of Democracy, Fernando Leila

Fernando Leila

The Missing Link of Democracy: The Federal Reserve Submission to the Democratic Government

“If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, (i.e., the "business cycle") the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered.”

Thomas Jefferson

Abstract

This paper examines the shortcomings of the Federal Reserve (the “Fed”) as an institution, its power and policy under a democratic system of government, and the consequences thereof.

America is ...


Professional Sports League Commissioners' Authority And Collective Bargaining, Matthew J. Parlow 2009 Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law

Professional Sports League Commissioners' Authority And Collective Bargaining, Matthew J. Parlow

Matthew Parlow

With the National Basketball Association (NBA) and National Football League (NFL) collective bargaining agreements set to expire within the next two years, many experts are already predicting what changes may be made to both leagues’ governing labor documents. One likely point of contention between the owners and the players’ unions — though rarely discussed in the experts’ predictive discourse — is the power of the respective league commissioners to punish or discipline wayward players for misbehavior committed off of the court or field. This article will analyze this area of sports law by exploring this power of each league’s sports commissioner ...


Anatomy Of The First Public International Sports Arbitration And The Future Of Public Arbitration After Usada V. Floyd Landis, Maureen A. Weston Prof. 2009 Pepperdine University

Anatomy Of The First Public International Sports Arbitration And The Future Of Public Arbitration After Usada V. Floyd Landis, Maureen A. Weston Prof.

Maureen A Weston

Mere weeks after American professional cyclist Floyd Landis seemingly won the 2006 Tour de France, the United States Anti-Doping Association (USADA), under the authority granted to it by the U.S. Congress, and through its enforcement of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC), accused him of having committed doping violations during the race. Landis vehemently denied these allegations, and accused the French laboratory that had performed the testing of his post-race samples, the Laboratoire National du Depistage du Dopage (LNDD), of bias and misconduct in his case.

Under USADA rules, an American athlete accused of doping may request an arbitration hearing ...


The Other Avenues Of Hall Street And Prospects For Judicial Review Of Arbitral Awards, Maureen A. Weston Prof. 2009 Pepperdine University

The Other Avenues Of Hall Street And Prospects For Judicial Review Of Arbitral Awards, Maureen A. Weston Prof.

Maureen A Weston

In Hall Street Associates, L.L.C. v. Mattel, Inc., the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) provided the exclusive grounds for judicial vacatur and modification of arbitral awards covered under the Act. In so ruling, the Court rejected the contention that the FAA’s requirement to enforce arbitration contracts as written includes private contracts that seek to expand the scope of judicial review beyond the grounds enumerated in the FAA. Despite holding that parties cannot expand a court’s power to review an arbitration award under the FAA, the Court alluded to the possibility ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress