Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Criminal Procedure Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

9,018 Full-Text Articles 5,641 Authors 3,273,205 Downloads 193 Institutions

All Articles in Criminal Procedure

Faceted Search

9,018 full-text articles. Page 1 of 206.

The Ethics Of Interrogation: How Unethical Interrogations Lead To False Confessions And What It Means For The Criminal, Janelle Havens 2021 Merrimack College

The Ethics Of Interrogation: How Unethical Interrogations Lead To False Confessions And What It Means For The Criminal, Janelle Havens

Criminology Student Work

Forensic interrogation is a vital step in the process of criminal investigations in order to extract information about suspects and the crime at hand. However, tunnel vision, artificial time constraints, lack of thorough training, and noble-cause corruption can influence how an investigator decides to interrogate a suspect or witness. When these influences are exerted on an investigator, the need to secure an arrest and conviction overpowers the need for justice - this results in false confessions and wrongful convictions. This is otherwise known as “the end doesn't justify the means” mindset. This causes investigators to engage in unethical interrogations, whether ...


Feigned Consensus: Usurping The Law In Shaken Baby Syndrome/Abusive Head Trauma Prosecutions, Keith A. Findley, D. Michael Risinger, Patrick D. Barnes, Julie A. Mack, David A. Moran, Barry C. Scheck, Thomas L. Bohan 2020 University of Wisconsin Law School

Feigned Consensus: Usurping The Law In Shaken Baby Syndrome/Abusive Head Trauma Prosecutions, Keith A. Findley, D. Michael Risinger, Patrick D. Barnes, Julie A. Mack, David A. Moran, Barry C. Scheck, Thomas L. Bohan

Articles

Few medico-legal matters have generated as much controversy--both in the medical literature and in the courtroom--as Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS), now known more broadly as Abusive Head Trauma (AHT). The controversies are of enormous significance in the law because child abuse pediatricians claim, on the basis of a few non-specific medical findings supported by a weak and methodologically flawed research base, to be able to “diagnose” child abuse, and thereby to provide all of the evidence necessary to satisfy all of the legal elements for criminal prosecution (or removal of children from their parents). It is a matter, therefore, in ...


Nycla Justice Center Task Force: Solving The Problem Of Innocent People Pleading Guilty, 2020 Pace University

Nycla Justice Center Task Force: Solving The Problem Of Innocent People Pleading Guilty

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


United States V. Lozoya: The Turbulence Of Establishing Venue For In-Flight Offenses, Daeja Pemberton 2020 Texas A&M University School of Law

United States V. Lozoya: The Turbulence Of Establishing Venue For In-Flight Offenses, Daeja Pemberton

Texas A&M Law Review

The U.S. Constitution protects one’s right to a fair trial in a proper venue. Typically, venue is proper in whatever territorial jurisdiction a defendant commits an offense. But this rule is not as clear-cut when the offense takes place in a special jurisdiction, such as American airspace. A court must then determine whether the offense continued into the venue of arrival, making it proper under the Constitution. This issue was reexamined when Monique Lozoya assaulted another passenger on an airplane during a domestic flight. In United States v. Lozoya, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals failed to correctly ...


Flipping The Script On Brady, Ion Meyn 2020 University of Wisconsin - Madison

Flipping The Script On Brady, Ion Meyn

Indiana Law Journal

Brady v. Maryland imposes a disclosure obligation on the prosecutor and, for this

reason, is understood to burden the prosecutor. This Article asks whether Brady also

benefits the prosecutor, and if so, how and to what extent does it accomplish this?

This Article first considers Brady’s structural impact—how the case influenced

broader dynamics of litigation. Before Brady, legislative reform transformed civil

and criminal litigation by providing pretrial information to civil defendants but not

to criminal defendants. Did this disparate treatment comport with due process?

Brady arguably answered this question by brokering a compromise: in exchange for

imposing minor ...


Regressive Prosecutors: Law And Order Politics And Practices In Trump’S Doj, Mona Lynch 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Regressive Prosecutors: Law And Order Politics And Practices In Trump’S Doj, Mona Lynch

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

No abstract provided.


Should Consistency Be Part Of The Reform Prosecutor’S Playbook?, Kay Levine 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Should Consistency Be Part Of The Reform Prosecutor’S Playbook?, Kay Levine

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

In this piece, I explore the value of consistency in a prosecutor’s office that is committed to racial justice, fiscal responsibility, and strategies to reduce the size of the carceral state. I argue that consistency of process, rather than consistency of outcome, is the principal value that leadership ought to embrace in furtherance of its reformist goals. In prioritizing consistency of process, the office would design a “prosecutorial calculus” to guide line prosecutors’ case management decisions (i.e., it would identify the factors that should influence whether and what to file, how to handle pre-trial release, and what to ...


United States V. Stevens At 10: Adding A “Prurient Intent” Element To Resolve Constitutional Overbreadth In The Federal Anti-Animal Cruelty Statute, 18 U.S.C. § 48, Dale Radford 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

United States V. Stevens At 10: Adding A “Prurient Intent” Element To Resolve Constitutional Overbreadth In The Federal Anti-Animal Cruelty Statute, 18 U.S.C. § 48, Dale Radford

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

Ten years ago, in United States v. Stevens, the United States Supreme Court overturned the federal anti-animal cruelty statute 18 U.S.C. § 48 for the first time. The statute was specifically drafted to target the clandestine underground production of so-called “crush videos,” adult entertainment videos depicting animals being purposefully tortured to death by scantily clad women.

The Court overturned the statute for potentially criminalizing portrayals of legal activity with redeeming socio-cultural value, such as hunting. While the Court relied heavily on analyzing speech as it relates to child pornography, it did not address whether depictions of animal torture constitute ...


Masthead, 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Masthead

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

No abstract provided.


Editors’ Foreword, Tatiana Herschlikowicz, Christopher Johnson 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Editors’ Foreword, Tatiana Herschlikowicz, Christopher Johnson

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

No abstract provided.


Forensic Searches Of Electronic Devices And The Border Search Exception: Movement Toward Requirement For Particularized Suspicion, Marissa Pursel 2020 The University of Akron

Forensic Searches Of Electronic Devices And The Border Search Exception: Movement Toward Requirement For Particularized Suspicion, Marissa Pursel

Akron Law Review

Under current federal law, government agents at the national border have broad discretion to search a traveler seeking to enter or exit the United States. While these government agents would generally need a warrant to conduct the same search elsewhere, searches at the border do not require any degree of suspicion. The policy argument that protects this practice is national security, recognizing the border’s vulnerability to physical threats such as the transportation of contraband and dangerous weapons. Current federal policy, however, makes no distinction between the search of a traveler’s suitcase and the search of her smartphone. The ...


Exactly What They Asked For: Linking Harm And Intent In Wire Fraud Prosecutions, Christina M. Frohock, Marcos Daniel Jiménez 2020 University of Miami School of Law

Exactly What They Asked For: Linking Harm And Intent In Wire Fraud Prosecutions, Christina M. Frohock, Marcos Daniel Jiménez

University of Miami Law Review

Recent opinions have obscured the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit’s guidance on federal criminal fraud prosecutions. In 2016, the court decided United States v. Takhalov and found no crime of wire fraud where the alleged victims received the benefit of their bargain. Just three years later, the concurring opinion in United States v. Feldman criticized that prior reasoning as puzzling, inviting problematic interpretations that become untethered from the common law of fraud. This Article tracks the development of the court’s view and argues for an interpretation of Takhalov that links harm to the specific ...


The Difference Of One Vote Or One Day: Reviewing The Demographics Of Florida’S Death Row After Hurst V. Florida, Melanie Kalmanson 2020 University of Miami Law School

The Difference Of One Vote Or One Day: Reviewing The Demographics Of Florida’S Death Row After Hurst V. Florida, Melanie Kalmanson

University of Miami Law Review

As the federal appeals court with jurisdiction over Florida and Alabama—two leaders in capital punishment in the United States—the Eleventh Circuit reviews several claims each year related to capital punishment. Florida is home to one of the largest death row populations in the country. Thus, understanding Florida’s capital sentencing scheme is important for understanding capital punishment nationwide.

This Article analyzes the empirical demographics of Florida’s death row population and reviews how defendants are sentenced to death and ultimately executed in Florida. The analysis reveals that although age is not a factor upon which murder/manslaughter defendants ...


Adequate And Effective: Postconviction Relief Through Section 2255 And Intervening Changes In Law, Ethan D. Beck 2020 Notre Dame Law School

Adequate And Effective: Postconviction Relief Through Section 2255 And Intervening Changes In Law, Ethan D. Beck

Notre Dame Law Review

This Note begins in Part I by providing a general introduction to modern postconviction relief, with special attention to the interaction between habeas corpus petitions and the § 2255 motion that performs much of the work traditionally assigned to the habeas writ. Section I.A begins to describe the debate in the federal circuit courts over the proper scope of the clause of § 2255 with which this Note is primarily concerned, the so-called “savings clause” of § 2255(e). Section I.B relates the importance of correctly construing the savings clause, as well as the dangers of a split in circuit interpretation ...


Steps Toward Abolishing Capital Punishment: Incrementalism In The American Death Penalty, Melanie Kalmanson 2020 William & Mary Law School

Steps Toward Abolishing Capital Punishment: Incrementalism In The American Death Penalty, Melanie Kalmanson

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

While scholars seem united on the sentiment that abolition is the ultimate resting place for capital sentencing in the United States, their arguments vary as to how the system will reach that point. For example, Carol and Jordan Steiker argue that the systemic disarray of capital sentencing in the United States is a result of the U.S. Supreme Court’s attempt to constitutionalize capital sentencing. This Article contends that the U.S. Supreme Court’s constitutional jurisprudence that has developed since 1972, when the Court reset capital sentencing in Furman v. Georgia, has aided the Court in gradually narrowing ...


Who Is My Brother’S Keeper?, Rudy Martinez 2020 University of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Who Is My Brother’S Keeper?, Rudy Martinez

University of St. Thomas Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Recidivist Sentencing And The Sixth Amendment, Benjamin E. Adams 2020 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Recidivist Sentencing And The Sixth Amendment, Benjamin E. Adams

Indiana Journal of Law and Social Equality

No abstract provided.


The Acquisition Of Scientific Evidence Between Frye And Daubert. From Ad Hominem Arguments To Cross-Examination Among Experts, Lorenzo Zoppellari 2020 University of Trento

The Acquisition Of Scientific Evidence Between Frye And Daubert. From Ad Hominem Arguments To Cross-Examination Among Experts, Lorenzo Zoppellari

OSSA Conference Archive

The Frye and Daubert rulings give us two very different ways to intend the relation between law and science. Through the contributions of Wellman and Walton, we will see how the main method to question the expert’s testimony before a judge deferent to science is to question her personal integrity by using ad hominem arguments. Otherwise, using Alvin Goldman’s novice/expert problem, we will investigate if other manners of argumentative cross-examinations are possible.


An Uneven Playing Field: The Government Extended Rights Denied To Defendants On Appeal, Breyana Fleming 2020 Mercer University School of Law

An Uneven Playing Field: The Government Extended Rights Denied To Defendants On Appeal, Breyana Fleming

Mercer Law Review

Many people find themselves in the crosshairs of the criminal justice system as defendants. In preparing to defend themselves against the charges being brought by the government, these defendants cannot predict whether the outcome of a criminal proceeding will result in a finding of innocence or guilt. Defendants can, however, generally depend on uniformity in the law as it pertains to appellate procedure. Still, there are times where this uniformity will be sacrificed, and further, when it will be done in an unjust manner. For instance, when an appellate court allows the federal government to maintain an argument against a ...


Ethical And Aggressive Appellate Advocacy: The Decision To Petition For Certiorari In Criminal Cases, J. Thomas Sullivan 2020 University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Ethical And Aggressive Appellate Advocacy: The Decision To Petition For Certiorari In Criminal Cases, J. Thomas Sullivan

St. Mary's Law Journal

Over the past six decades, United States Supreme Court decisions have dramatically reshaped the criminal justice process to provide significant protections for defendants charged in federal and state proceedings reflecting a remarkable expansion of due process and specific constitutional guarantees. For criminal defendants seeking relief based on recognition of new rules of constitutional criminal procedure, application of existing rules or precedent to novel factual scenarios, or in some cases, enforcement of existing precedent, obtaining relief requires further action on the Court’s part. In those situations, the Court’s exercise of its certiorari jurisdiction is the exclusive remedy offering an ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress