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A Comparison Of Public Defenders Vs. Private Attorneys, Tiffany Costello 2021 Merrimack College

A Comparison Of Public Defenders Vs. Private Attorneys, Tiffany Costello

Honors Senior Capstone Projects

This study seeks to determine whether there are any differences in conviction rates or client satisfaction between public defenders and private attorneys in state or federal courts. Although researchers have spent time examining differences between attorney type and client satisfaction or conviction rates, little information exists on the assessment of attorney type in the federal system. The study will consist of a two-part survey with approximately twenty-seven closed-ended questions about client satisfaction, conviction, court, and attorney type. The target population will be any criminal defendant in federal or state court with an attorney. In this study, the sampling method will ...


The Ethics Of Interrogation: How Unethical Interrogations Lead To False Confessions And What It Means For The Criminal, Janelle Havens 2021 Merrimack College

The Ethics Of Interrogation: How Unethical Interrogations Lead To False Confessions And What It Means For The Criminal, Janelle Havens

Criminology Student Work

Forensic interrogation is a vital step in the process of criminal investigations in order to extract information about suspects and the crime at hand. However, tunnel vision, artificial time constraints, lack of thorough training, and noble-cause corruption can influence how an investigator decides to interrogate a suspect or witness. When these influences are exerted on an investigator, the need to secure an arrest and conviction overpowers the need for justice - this results in false confessions and wrongful convictions. This is otherwise known as “the end doesn't justify the means” mindset. This causes investigators to engage in unethical interrogations, whether ...


Nycla Justice Center Task Force: Solving The Problem Of Innocent People Pleading Guilty, 2020 Pace University

Nycla Justice Center Task Force: Solving The Problem Of Innocent People Pleading Guilty

Pace Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cybersecurity-Online Identity Theft, Amy J. Ramson 2020 CUNY Hostos Community College

Cybersecurity-Online Identity Theft, Amy J. Ramson

Open Educational Resources

This is an activity the goals of which are to facilitate team work; critical thinking; presentation skills in the area of cybersecurity and law. Students will be grouped into two teams. As a team, they will choose and analyze cases about online identity theft through the questions presented in the activity. They will present their analysis to the class.


Cybersecurity-Corporate Espionage, Amy J. Ramson 2020 CUNY Hostos Community College

Cybersecurity-Corporate Espionage, Amy J. Ramson

Open Educational Resources

The goals of this team activity in the area of criminal law, cybersecurity and cyber crime are to facilitate team work, critical thinking and presentation skills. Students will be grouped into two teams. As a team, they will analyze cases about corporate espionage committed by nation states and industry competitors through the questions presented in the activity. They will present their analysis to the class.


Cybersecurity-The Internet Of Things, Amy J. Ramson 2020 CUNY Hostos Community College

Cybersecurity-The Internet Of Things, Amy J. Ramson

Open Educational Resources

With 38.5 billion smart devices in existence in 2020 and increasing every year, the potential for security breaches in the Internet of things is also escalating at a dramatic pace. The goal of this team activity is to facilitate team work, critical thinking, and presentation skills in the area of cybersecurity and the Internet of Things. Students will be grouped into two teams. As a team, they will analyze cases about security cameras and smart dolls through the questions presented in the activity. They will present their analysis to the class.


Cybersecurity-Fake News, Amy J. Ramson 2020 CUNY Hostos Community College

Cybersecurity-Fake News, Amy J. Ramson

Open Educational Resources

This goals of this activity are to facilitate team work, critical thinking, and presentation skills in the area of cybersecurity and fake news. Students will be grouped into two teams. As a team, they will choose and analyze cases and ethical questions about fake news through the questions presented in the activity. They will present their analysis to the class.


Cybersecurity-The Silk Road Market, Amy J. Ramson 2020 CUNY Hostos Community College

Cybersecurity-The Silk Road Market, Amy J. Ramson

Open Educational Resources

This presentation is about the Silk Road Market, one of the largest cases of illegal drug activity on the dark web, that the federal government has prosecuted. Beyond discussing the case, the presentation adds general facts about the US Department of Justice, the FBI and the DEA, and federal sentencing. The case discussion includes information about: Ross Ulbricht the creator and head of the market; how the Silk Road operated; the involvement of the FBI and DEA; the trial; the fourth amendment violations alleged by the defense; and the sentencing.


Cybersecurity-Cybercrime-The Legal Environment, Amy J. Ramson 2020 CUNY Hostos Community College

Cybersecurity-Cybercrime-The Legal Environment, Amy J. Ramson

Open Educational Resources

This presentation covers the legal environment of cybercrime to date. It addresses: the challenges of law enforcement; federal government vs. sate jurisdiction of cybercrime; law enforcement department and agencies which handle cybercrime; criminal statutes and privacy statutes.


United States V. Lozoya: The Turbulence Of Establishing Venue For In-Flight Offenses, Daeja Pemberton 2020 Texas A&M University School of Law

United States V. Lozoya: The Turbulence Of Establishing Venue For In-Flight Offenses, Daeja Pemberton

Texas A&M Law Review

The U.S. Constitution protects one’s right to a fair trial in a proper venue. Typically, venue is proper in whatever territorial jurisdiction a defendant commits an offense. But this rule is not as clear-cut when the offense takes place in a special jurisdiction, such as American airspace. A court must then determine whether the offense continued into the venue of arrival, making it proper under the Constitution. This issue was reexamined when Monique Lozoya assaulted another passenger on an airplane during a domestic flight. In United States v. Lozoya, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals failed to correctly ...


Flipping The Script On Brady, Ion Meyn 2020 University of Wisconsin - Madison

Flipping The Script On Brady, Ion Meyn

Indiana Law Journal

Brady v. Maryland imposes a disclosure obligation on the prosecutor and, for this

reason, is understood to burden the prosecutor. This Article asks whether Brady also

benefits the prosecutor, and if so, how and to what extent does it accomplish this?

This Article first considers Brady’s structural impact—how the case influenced

broader dynamics of litigation. Before Brady, legislative reform transformed civil

and criminal litigation by providing pretrial information to civil defendants but not

to criminal defendants. Did this disparate treatment comport with due process?

Brady arguably answered this question by brokering a compromise: in exchange for

imposing minor ...


Regressive Prosecutors: Law And Order Politics And Practices In Trump’S Doj, Mona Lynch 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Regressive Prosecutors: Law And Order Politics And Practices In Trump’S Doj, Mona Lynch

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

No abstract provided.


Should Consistency Be Part Of The Reform Prosecutor’S Playbook?, Kay Levine 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Should Consistency Be Part Of The Reform Prosecutor’S Playbook?, Kay Levine

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

In this piece, I explore the value of consistency in a prosecutor’s office that is committed to racial justice, fiscal responsibility, and strategies to reduce the size of the carceral state. I argue that consistency of process, rather than consistency of outcome, is the principal value that leadership ought to embrace in furtherance of its reformist goals. In prioritizing consistency of process, the office would design a “prosecutorial calculus” to guide line prosecutors’ case management decisions (i.e., it would identify the factors that should influence whether and what to file, how to handle pre-trial release, and what to ...


United States V. Stevens At 10: Adding A “Prurient Intent” Element To Resolve Constitutional Overbreadth In The Federal Anti-Animal Cruelty Statute, 18 U.S.C. § 48, Dale Radford 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

United States V. Stevens At 10: Adding A “Prurient Intent” Element To Resolve Constitutional Overbreadth In The Federal Anti-Animal Cruelty Statute, 18 U.S.C. § 48, Dale Radford

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

Ten years ago, in United States v. Stevens, the United States Supreme Court overturned the federal anti-animal cruelty statute 18 U.S.C. § 48 for the first time. The statute was specifically drafted to target the clandestine underground production of so-called “crush videos,” adult entertainment videos depicting animals being purposefully tortured to death by scantily clad women.

The Court overturned the statute for potentially criminalizing portrayals of legal activity with redeeming socio-cultural value, such as hunting. While the Court relied heavily on analyzing speech as it relates to child pornography, it did not address whether depictions of animal torture constitute ...


Masthead, 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Masthead

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

No abstract provided.


Editors’ Foreword, Tatiana Herschlikowicz, Christopher Johnson 2020 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Editors’ Foreword, Tatiana Herschlikowicz, Christopher Johnson

Hastings Journal of Crime and Punishment

No abstract provided.


Forensic Searches Of Electronic Devices And The Border Search Exception: Movement Toward Requirement For Particularized Suspicion, Marissa Pursel 2020 The University of Akron

Forensic Searches Of Electronic Devices And The Border Search Exception: Movement Toward Requirement For Particularized Suspicion, Marissa Pursel

Akron Law Review

Under current federal law, government agents at the national border have broad discretion to search a traveler seeking to enter or exit the United States. While these government agents would generally need a warrant to conduct the same search elsewhere, searches at the border do not require any degree of suspicion. The policy argument that protects this practice is national security, recognizing the border’s vulnerability to physical threats such as the transportation of contraband and dangerous weapons. Current federal policy, however, makes no distinction between the search of a traveler’s suitcase and the search of her smartphone. The ...


Fixing The Broken System Of Assessing Criminal Appeals For Frivolousness, Andrew S. Pollis 2020 The University of Akron

Fixing The Broken System Of Assessing Criminal Appeals For Frivolousness, Andrew S. Pollis

Akron Law Review

This article seeks to end fifty years of confusion over how to proceed when a criminal defendant wants to appeal but appointed counsel sees no basis for doing so.

Practices vary among jurisdictions, but most require counsel to explain the predicament to the court—often at a level of detail that compromises the duty of loyalty to the client. Most also require the court to double-check counsel’s conclusion by conducting its own independent review of the record, thus burdening judges and blurring the important line between judge and advocate. And at no point in this process does the defendant ...


The Movement To Decriminalize Border Crossing, Ingrid V. Eagly 2020 UCLA School of Law

The Movement To Decriminalize Border Crossing, Ingrid V. Eagly

Boston College Law Review

Should it be a crime to cross the border into the United States? This Article explores the growing resistance to the politics and practices of mass border criminalization. In doing so, it makes three central contributions. First, it dissects the varied strands of the punitive practices of the U.S. Department of Justice, including policies of zero-tolerance prosecution for first-time unauthorized border crossers and enhanced punishments for those who reenter after deportation. Second, it traces how growing public awareness of the previously hidden practices occurring in Border Patrol holding cells and federal criminal courts along the Southwest border have sparked ...


Exactly What They Asked For: Linking Harm And Intent In Wire Fraud Prosecutions, Christina M. Frohock, Marcos Daniel Jiménez 2020 University of Miami School of Law

Exactly What They Asked For: Linking Harm And Intent In Wire Fraud Prosecutions, Christina M. Frohock, Marcos Daniel Jiménez

University of Miami Law Review

Recent opinions have obscured the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit’s guidance on federal criminal fraud prosecutions. In 2016, the court decided United States v. Takhalov and found no crime of wire fraud where the alleged victims received the benefit of their bargain. Just three years later, the concurring opinion in United States v. Feldman criticized that prior reasoning as puzzling, inviting problematic interpretations that become untethered from the common law of fraud. This Article tracks the development of the court’s view and argues for an interpretation of Takhalov that links harm to the specific ...


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