Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Corporation and Enterprise Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

4,007 Full-Text Articles 2,762 Authors 1,917,471 Downloads 100 Institutions

All Articles in Corporation and Enterprise Law

Faceted Search

4,007 full-text articles. Page 1 of 63.

Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas For Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby's Wake, Amy Sepinwall 2015 Legal Studies & Business Ethics/Wharton University of Pennsylvania

Conscience And Complicity: Assessing Pleas For Religious Exemptions In Hobby Lobby's Wake, Amy Sepinwall

Amy J. Sepinwall

In the paradigmatic case of conscientious objection, the objector claims that his religion forbids him from actively participating in a wrong (e.g., by fighting in a war). In the religious challenges to the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate, on the other hand, employers claim that their religious convictions forbid them from merely subsidizing insurance through which their employees might commit a wrong (e.g., by using contraception). The understanding of complicity underpinning these challenges is vastly more expansive than what standard legal doctrine or moral theory contemplates. Courts routinely reject claims of conscientious objection to taxes that fund ...


Wink, Wink, Nudge Judge: Persuading U.S. Courts To Take Accountants Seriously In Federal Securities Cases With Help From The U.K. Companies Act, Kurt S. Schulzke 2015 Kennesaw State University

Wink, Wink, Nudge Judge: Persuading U.S. Courts To Take Accountants Seriously In Federal Securities Cases With Help From The U.K. Companies Act, Kurt S. Schulzke

Kurt S. Schulzke

The 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers reopened wounds many thought were healed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) in 2002. The Lehman litigation finally ended in late 2013 with audit firm Ernst & Young paying $99 million to investors who claimed the firm misled them with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and other defendants, including banks, officers, and directors, paying out more than $500 million. The bright line standards of GAAP and SOX were obviously not enough to protect Lehman plaintiffs or defendants. Why not? The 2006 fraud trial of Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling offers clues. When asked at trial whether U ...


Public Actors In Private Markets: Toward A Developmental Finance State, Robert C. Hockett, Saule T. Omarova 2015 Cornell Law School

Public Actors In Private Markets: Toward A Developmental Finance State, Robert C. Hockett, Saule T. Omarova

Robert C. Hockett

The recent financial crisis brought into sharp relief fundamental questions about the social function and purpose of the financial system, including its relation to the “real” economy. This Article argues that, to answer these questions, we must recapture a distinctively American view of the proper relations among state, financial market, and development. This programmatic vision – captured in what we call a “developmental finance state” – is based on three key propositions: (1) that economic and social development is not an “end-state” but a continuing national policy priority; (2) that the modalities of finance are the most potent means of fueling continuous ...


Through The Lens Of Innovation, Mirit Eyal-Cohen 2015 University of Alabama School of Law

Through The Lens Of Innovation, Mirit Eyal-Cohen

Mirit Eyal-Cohen

The legal system constantly follows the footsteps of innovation and attempts to discourage its migration overseas. Yet, present legal rules that inform and explain entrepreneurial circumstances lack a core understanding of the concept of innovation. By its nature, law imposes order. It provides rules, remedies, and classifications that direct behavior in a consistent manner. Innovation turns on the contrary. It entails making creative judgments about the unknown. It involves adapting to disarray. It thrives on deviations as opposed to traditional causation. This Article argues that these differences matter. It demonstrates that current laws lock entrepreneurs into inefficient legal routes. Using ...


The Impact Of Hedge Fund Activism: Evidence And Implications, John C. Coffee, Jr., Darius Palia 2015 Columbia University

The Impact Of Hedge Fund Activism: Evidence And Implications, John C. Coffee, Jr., Darius Palia

John C Coffee, Jr.

Hedge Fund activism has increased almost hyperbolically. Some view this optimistically as a means for bridging the separation of ownership and control; others are more pessimistic, seeing mainly wealth transfers from bondholders or speculative expectations of a takeover as fueling the spike. Equivalent division exists over the impact of this increased activism, with optimists seeing real gains that do not erode over time and improvements in operating performance, and pessimists finding shortened investment horizons, increased leverage, and reduced investment in research and development.

Our perspective is analytic. We begin by surveying the regulatory and institutional developments that have reduced the ...


Examining Success, Jonathan C. Lipson 2015 Temple University

Examining Success, Jonathan C. Lipson

Jonathan C. Lipson

Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code presumes that managers will remain in possession and control of a corporate debtor. This presents an obvious agency problem: these same managers may have gotten the company into trouble in the first place. The Bankruptcy Code thus includes checks and balances in the reorganization process, one of which is supposed to be an “examiner,” a private individual appointed to investigate and report on the debtor’s collapse.

We study their use in practice. Extending prior research, we find that examiners are exceedingly rare, despite the fact that they should be “mandatory” in large cases ...


Public Actors In Private Markets: Toward A Developmental Finance State, Robert C. Hockett, Saule T. Omarova 2015 Cornell Law School

Public Actors In Private Markets: Toward A Developmental Finance State, Robert C. Hockett, Saule T. Omarova

Cornell Law Faculty Working Papers

The recent financial crisis brought into sharp relief fundamental questions about the social function and purpose of the financial system, including its relation to the “real” economy. This Article argues that, to answer these questions, we must recapture a distinctively American view of the proper relations among state, financial market, and development. This programmatic vision – captured in what we call a “developmental finance state” – is based on three key propositions: (1) that economic and social development is not an “end-state” but a continuing national policy priority; (2) that the modalities of finance are the most potent means of fueling continuous ...


Law, Fugitive Capital, And Karl Polanyi's The Great Transformation, walter j. kendall lll 2015 the john marshall law school

Law, Fugitive Capital, And Karl Polanyi's The Great Transformation, Walter J. Kendall Lll

walter j kendall lll

No abstract provided.


The Neomercantilist Fallacy And The Contextual Reality Of The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, Philip M. Nichols 2015 The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

The Neomercantilist Fallacy And The Contextual Reality Of The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, Philip M. Nichols

Philip M. Nichols

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act is domestic legislation and should be analyzed as such. This article addresses a persistent failure in analysis of the Act, by scholars and policymakers alike. Many discussions of the Act approach it from a neomercantilist perspective. This approach contains three flaws. First, whereas neomercantilism envisions manipulation of the market to give advantage to national champion industries, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act was adopted for the purpose of strengthening and enhancing the integrity of the global market. A neomercantilist perspective is contrary to the purpose of the Act. Second, this article shows that neomercantilism fundamentally misunderstands ...


Deferred Corporate Prosecution As Corrupt Regime: The Case For Prison, 2015 The George Washington University

Deferred Corporate Prosecution As Corrupt Regime: The Case For Prison

Lawrence E. Mitchell

Abstract: This paper looks at the growing phenomenon of deferred corporate criminal prosecutions from a new perspective. The literature accepts the practice and is largely concerned with the degree to which efficient and effective criminal deterrence is achieved through pretrial diversion. I examine the practice and conclude that it presents, from a structural perspective, a case of a corrupt law enforcement regime centered in the United States Department of Justice. The regime works in effective –if unintentional-- conspiracy with corporate officials to produce an inefficient enforcement regime that disregards democratic processes and threatens a loss of respect for the rule ...


Corporate Decision-Making, Corporate Collapse And Inefficiency, Jeremy Pearce Dr 2015 Bond University

Corporate Decision-Making, Corporate Collapse And Inefficiency, Jeremy Pearce Dr

Corporate Governance eJournal

Swift action must be taken to remedy managerial situations and actions that are not in accordance with the best interests of the company. This requires solutions that take the company forward – every moment, every decision, every day – without fail – no excuses.


Disc To Fsc: A Small Business Alternative?, Scott J. Klosinski 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Disc To Fsc: A Small Business Alternative?, Scott J. Klosinski

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Tax Reform Act Of 1984 - International Related-Party Factoring - A Major Tax Loophole For Multinational Corporations Is Closed, Phil Conner 2015 University of Georgia School of Law

Tax Reform Act Of 1984 - International Related-Party Factoring - A Major Tax Loophole For Multinational Corporations Is Closed, Phil Conner

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Family Llc: A New Approach To Insuring Dynastic Wealth, Evan M. Purcell 2015 George Mason University

The Family Llc: A New Approach To Insuring Dynastic Wealth, Evan M. Purcell

Evan M Purcell

No abstract provided.


Why Corporate Tax Reform Can Happen, Edward D. Kleinbard 2015 University of Southern California

Why Corporate Tax Reform Can Happen, Edward D. Kleinbard

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This brief essay explains in an informal way to nonspecialists what the stakes are for corporate tax reform and why such reform is more politically feasible than most observers believe. The essay emphasizes the central importance of international tax design as the largest conceptual impediment, but demonstrates that a framework has emerged that can serve as the basis for constructive negotiations. The essay further offers a novel strategy for dealing with the problem that a large fraction of U.S. business income is earned by unincorporated businesses.


Nothing To Do With Personhood: Corporate Constitutional Rights And The Principle Of Confiscation, Paul Kens Dr. 2015 Texas State University

Nothing To Do With Personhood: Corporate Constitutional Rights And The Principle Of Confiscation, Paul Kens Dr.

Paul Kens Dr.

In its 2010 decision Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission the Supreme Court overruled a federal statute that limited a corporation’s ability to pay for political advertising out of its general treasury funds. Those limits, it ruled, violated the corporation’s right to freedom of speech. The case has since become notorious for the widely held belief that, in doing so, the Court declared that corporations are “persons,” possessing the same constitutional rights as flesh and blood human beings. Four years later the Court seemed to expand on this conclusion when it ruled in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that ...


Employee Say-On-Pay: Monitoring And Legitimizing Executive Compensation, Robert J. Rhee 2015 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Employee Say-On-Pay: Monitoring And Legitimizing Executive Compensation, Robert J. Rhee

Robert Rhee

This Article proposes the adoption of employee say-on-pay in corporate governance. The board would benefit from an advisory vote of employees on executive compensation. This proposal is based on two considerations: firstly, the benefits of better monitoring and reduced agency cost in corporate governance; secondly, the link between executive compensation and income inequity and wealth disparity in the broader economy. If adopted, shareholders and employees would monitor executive performance and pay at different levels. Shareholders through the market mechanism can only monitor at the level of public disclosures and share price. Employees can leverage private information. Non-executive managers in particular ...


Enduring Design For Business Entities, William E. Foster 2015 University of Arkansas

Enduring Design For Business Entities, William E. Foster

William E Foster

The success or failure of an institution may hinge on some of the earliest decisions of its founders. In constitutional design literature, endurance is a widely accepted drafting objective. Indeed, constitutional endurance is positively associated with prosperous and stable societies. Like drafters of constitutions, business organizers have almost innumerable objectives for their enterprises, and attorneys drafting organizational documents must take into account these myriad goals. Oftentimes the drafting process fails to fully address some of the most important of these aims and results in suboptimal structures that lack predictability and reliability.

This article looks specifically at small business organizations and ...


Securities Fraud Damages Under The Pslra, Mohammed A. Misbah 2015 SelectedWorks

Securities Fraud Damages Under The Pslra, Mohammed A. Misbah

Mohammed A Misbah

The United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act ("PSLRA") implemented several substantive changes affecting certain cases brought under the federal securities laws. It was designed to reduce the number of “frivolous” securities lawsuits filed in federal courts. Prior to the PSLRA, a securities fraud case could proceed with minimal evidence and use pre-trial discovery to search for more evidence that strongly suggested a deliberate fraud. Under the PSLRA plaintiffs need such evidence simply in order to commence an action. This article seeks to explain what evidence is required of a plaintiff in a security fraud case, in order to defeat ...


Correcting Corporate Benefit: How To Fix Shareholder Litigation By Shifting The Doctrine On Fees, Sean Griffith 2015 Fordham Law School

Correcting Corporate Benefit: How To Fix Shareholder Litigation By Shifting The Doctrine On Fees, Sean Griffith

Boston College Law Review

The current controversy in corporate law concerns whether firms can discourage litigation by shifting its cost to shareholders. But corporate law courts have long engaged in fee-shifting—from shareholder plaintiffs to the corporation—under the “corporate benefit” doctrine. This Article examines fee-shifting in share-holder litigation, arguing that current practices are unsound from the perspective of both doctrine and public policy. Unfortunately, the fee-shifting bylaws recently enacted in response to the problem of excessive shareholder litigation fare no better. The Article therefore offers a different approach to fee-shifting, articulating three specific reforms of the corporate benefit doctrine to quell the current ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress