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Tech And Authoritarianism: How The People’S Republic Of China Is Using Data To Control Hong Kong And Why The U.S. Is Vulnerable, Bryce Neary 2022 Seattle University School of Law

Tech And Authoritarianism: How The People’S Republic Of China Is Using Data To Control Hong Kong And Why The U.S. Is Vulnerable, Bryce Neary

Seattle Journal of Technology, Environmental & Innovation Law

The aim of this article is to analyze and compare current events in the People's Republic of China and the United States to discuss the moral dilemmas that arise when establishing the boundary between national security interests and individual privacy rights. As we continue to intertwine our lives with technology, it has become increasingly important to establish clear privacy rights. The question then becomes: at what point should individuals sacrifice their rights for what the government considers the "greater good" of the country?

Further, this article analyzes the development of U.S. privacy law and its relationship to national ...


Muskrat Textualism, Matthew L.M. Fletcher 2022 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Muskrat Textualism, Matthew L.M. Fletcher

Northwestern University Law Review

The Supreme Court decision McGirt v. Oklahoma, confirming the boundaries of the Creek Reservation in Oklahoma, was a truly rare case in which the Court turned back arguments by federal and state governments in favor of American Indian and tribal interests. For more than a century, Oklahomans had assumed that the reservation had been terminated and acted accordingly. But only Congress can terminate an Indian reservation, and it simply had never done so in the case of the Creek Reservation. Both the majority and dissenting opinions attempted to claim the mantle of textualism, but their respective analyses led to polar ...


Freedom, Democracy, And The Right To Education, Derek W. Black 2022 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Freedom, Democracy, And The Right To Education, Derek W. Black

Northwestern University Law Review

While litigation continues in an effort to establish a fundamental right to education under the U.S. Constitution, the full historical justification for this right remains missing—a fatal flaw for many jurists. This Article fills that gap, demonstrating that the central, yet entirely overlooked, justification for a federal right to education resides in America’s education story during the era of slavery and Reconstruction.

At that time, education was first and foremost about freedom. The South had criminalized education to maintain a racialized hierarchy that preserved slavery. Many African-Americans, seeing education as the means to both mental and physical ...


Girls, Assaulted, I. India Thusi 2022 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Girls, Assaulted, I. India Thusi

Northwestern University Law Review

Girls who are incarcerated share a common trait: They have often experienced multiple forms of sexual assault, at the hands of those close to them and at the hands of the state. The #MeToo movement has exposed how powerful people and institutions have facilitated pervasive sexual violence. However, there has been little attention paid to the ways that incarceration perpetuates sexual exploitation. This Article focuses on incarcerated girls and argues that the state routinely sexually assaults girls by mandating invasive, nonconsensual searches. Unwanted touching and display of private parts are common features of life before and after incarceration—from the ...


Forced Prison Labor: Punishment For A Crime?, Wafa Junaid 2022 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Forced Prison Labor: Punishment For A Crime?, Wafa Junaid

Northwestern University Law Review

The Thirteenth Amendment’s prohibition of involuntary servitude carves out an exception to its protections that allows the use of forced labor as “punishment for a crime” when an individual is “duly convicted.” Courts have interpreted this language as placing a categorical bar on Thirteenth Amendment claims alleged by individuals who are incarcerated. Yet, a consistent understanding of the term “punishment” that draws from the term’s use in the Eighth Amendment’s Cruel and Unusual Punishment Clause supports a narrower interpretation of the Thirteenth Amendment’s punishment exception. This Note argues that individuals cannot be denied Thirteenth Amendment protections ...


Judicial Ethics May Decide Whether A Prisoner Can Be Touched As He Is Executed, Mikayla Lewison 2022 Saint Louis University School of Law

Judicial Ethics May Decide Whether A Prisoner Can Be Touched As He Is Executed, Mikayla Lewison

SLU Law Journal Online

The community having faith in the judiciary is vital for the U.S. to function as a democracy. Recently, the Court has become seemingly more politicized, even though Americans prefer an apolitical court. In this article, Mikayla Lewison argues that personal interests of the justices on the Court have likely played a role in whether or not prisoners, like John Henry Ramirez, may have a cleric of their choice inside the chamber as they are executed.


Oversight Over The Constitutionality Of The Legislative Acts Of The Executive Authority: A Comparative Study, Prof. Numan Al-Khatib, Prof. Laith K. Nasrawin 2022 Professor of Public Law - School of Law - Amman Arab University

Oversight Over The Constitutionality Of The Legislative Acts Of The Executive Authority: A Comparative Study, Prof. Numan Al-Khatib, Prof. Laith K. Nasrawin

Journal Sharia and Law

This study deals with the constitutional oversight over the legislative acts, which are issued by the executive authority pursuant to the Jordanian Constitution. The study will shed the light on the nature of legal rules enacted by the Cabinet, with the approval of the King, and what extent they are subject to oversight by the Constitutional court. The legislation issued by the Executive authority are called regulations, which are of various types: independent, executive and legislative (Temporary Laws), in addition to the administrative instructions that are passed in normal circumstances. Defense orders are also legal rules issued by the Prime ...


Personalized Smart Guns: A Futuristic Dream Or A Pragmatic Solution?, Andres Paciuc 2022 Duke Law

Personalized Smart Guns: A Futuristic Dream Or A Pragmatic Solution?, Andres Paciuc

Duke Law & Technology Review

No abstract provided.


Gang Databases: Race And The Constitutional Failures Of Contemporary Gang Policing In New York City, Jasmine Johnson 2022 St. John's University School of Law

Gang Databases: Race And The Constitutional Failures Of Contemporary Gang Policing In New York City, Jasmine Johnson

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

Similar to many jurisdictions throughout the United States, the New York City Police Department (“NYPD”) has a gang database—a criminal intelligence system utilized by the NYPD to keep track of alleged “gang members” in New York City. And similar to many jurisdictions throughout the United States, the NYPD’s gang database has been severely criticized. Opponents of the gang database accuse the NYPD of using it as a tool for racial profiling, mass incarceration, and mass criminalization of Black and Brown young men in New York City. Opponents of the database also take issue with the NYPD’s ...


Giving The Equal Rights Amendment Teeth: A Proposal For Gender Equality Legislation Modeled After The Civil Rights Act Of 1964, Samantha Gagnon 2022 St. John's University School of Law

Giving The Equal Rights Amendment Teeth: A Proposal For Gender Equality Legislation Modeled After The Civil Rights Act Of 1964, Samantha Gagnon

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

Contrary to the belief of eighty percent of Americans, the U.S. Constitution does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex. The effect of this lack of protection can be seen in every corner of our society, including economic inequalities and a lack of representation in leadership. For almost one hundred years, women’s organizations and activists have attempted to rectify this by advocating for the inclusion of an Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) in the Constitution. In the past few years, there has been a revived push for the ERA due to the amendment’s first congressional hearing ...


Protecting Women's Voices: Preventing Retaliatory Defamation Claims In The #Metoo Context, Nicole Ligon 2022 St. John's University School of Law

Protecting Women's Voices: Preventing Retaliatory Defamation Claims In The #Metoo Context, Nicole Ligon

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

As part of a personal commitment to positively utilize my legal skills, I joined the Legal Network for Gender Equity, a group of attorneys who support individuals seeking to come forward about their experiences with sexual harassment and assault. Through this network, I regularly counsel women who want to share their stories but are concerned that by doing so, they may open themselves up to costly defamation suits from their aggressors. Their concerns are not so much rooted in any notion that their stories are or could actually be defamatory. Instead, these concerns often stem from a recognition that ...


Rising Up Without Pushing Down: Lessons Learned From The Suffragettes' Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric, Kit Johnson 2022 St. John's University School of Law

Rising Up Without Pushing Down: Lessons Learned From The Suffragettes' Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric, Kit Johnson

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

American suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton famously wrote: “We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men and women are created equal.” Yet when suffragettes spoke of “all” men and women, they were clear about exceptions. Immigrants did not qualify. Indeed, in her own address at the First Women’s Rights Convention, held in Seneca Falls, New York, in July 1848, Stanton said that “to have . . . ignorant foreigners . . . fully recognized, while we ourselves are thrust out from all the rights that belong to citizens, it is too grossly insulting to the dignity of woman to be longer quietly submitted ...


Commemorating The Forgotten Intersection Of The Fifteenth And Nineteenth Amendments, Taunya Lovell Banks 2022 St. John's University School of Law

Commemorating The Forgotten Intersection Of The Fifteenth And Nineteenth Amendments, Taunya Lovell Banks

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

The women’s rights movement, throughout its history, defined its priorities with reference to white middle- or upper- class women. Thus “discrimination that affected all women” included the right of owning property but not [B]lack women’s voting rights.

This year we commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment’s ratification. I use the term commemorate instead of celebrate because it is important to remember that this anniversary is also a time to reflect on the lost opportunities to advance equality for all one hundred years ago. This reflection seems especially appropriate in a presidential election ...


Introduction, Samantha Gagnon 2022 St. John's University School of Law

Introduction, Samantha Gagnon

St. John's Law Review

(Excerpt)

This issue of the St. John’s Law Review contains several articles which were first presented at the Law Review’s Fall 2020 Symposium. This symposium was organized to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which states very simply, “[t]he right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.”

The right to vote is one of the most important political rights in this country but for most, it was also one of the hardest-won rights. For 244 years ...


How Practices Make Principles, And How Principles Make Rules, Mitchell N. Berman 2022 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

How Practices Make Principles, And How Principles Make Rules, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

The most fundamental question in general jurisprudence concerns what makes it the case that the law has the content that it does. This article offers a novel answer. According to the theory it christens “principled positivism,” legal practices ground legal principles, and legal principles determine legal rules. This two-level account of the determination of legal content differs from Hart’s celebrated theory in two essential respects: in relaxing Hart’s requirement that fundamental legal notions depend for their existence on judicial consensus; and in assigning weighted contributory legal norms—“principles”—an essential role in the determination of legal rights, duties ...


Anonymous Expression And "Unmasking" In Civil And Criminal Proceedings, Leeza Arbatman, John Villasenor 2022 University of Minnesota Law School

Anonymous Expression And "Unmasking" In Civil And Criminal Proceedings, Leeza Arbatman, John Villasenor

Minnesota Journal of Law, Science & Technology

No abstract provided.


White Supremacy, Police Brutality, And Family Separation: Preventing Crimes Against Humanity Within The United States, Elena Baylis 2022 University of Pittsburgh School of Law

White Supremacy, Police Brutality, And Family Separation: Preventing Crimes Against Humanity Within The United States, Elena Baylis

Articles

Although the United States tends to treat crimes against humanity as a danger that exists only in authoritarian or war-torn states, in fact, there is a real risk of crimes against humanity occurring within the United States, as illustrated by events such as systemic police brutality against Black Americans, the federal government’s family separation policy that took thousands of immigrant children from their parents at the southern border, and the dramatic escalation of White supremacist and extremist violence culminating in the January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol. In spite of this risk, the United States does ...


Tinkering With The Schoolhouse Gate: The Future Of Student Speech After Mahanoy Area School District V. B.L., Victoria R. Bonds 2022 LMU Loyola Law School, Los Angeles

Tinkering With The Schoolhouse Gate: The Future Of Student Speech After Mahanoy Area School District V. B.L., Victoria R. Bonds

Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review

When the Supreme Court last created a rule about students’ First Amendment rights, MySpace was the most popular social media platform. Students’ use of social media and technology has radically changed since then, and it is time the First Amendment case law reflects that. With the transition to online learning after the COVID-19 pandemic and overall increased reliance on technology, students need clear answers about when school officials can punish them for their social media posts.

The Supreme Court had a chance to clarify First Amendment student speech law this year in Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L., but ...


Redefining The Badges And Incidents Of Slavery, Nicholas Serafin 2022 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Redefining The Badges And Incidents Of Slavery, Nicholas Serafin

Badges & Incidents

No abstract provided.


Was Justice Ginsburg Roe-Ght?: Reimagining U.S. Abortion Discourse In The Wake Of Argentina's Marea Verde, Kim D. Ricardo 2022 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Was Justice Ginsburg Roe-Ght?: Reimagining U.S. Abortion Discourse In The Wake Of Argentina's Marea Verde, Kim D. Ricardo

Mitchell Hamline Law Review

No abstract provided.


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