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Compression Of Virtual-Machine Memory In Dynamic Malware Analysis, James E. Fowler Ph.D. 2017 Mississippi State University

Compression Of Virtual-Machine Memory In Dynamic Malware Analysis, James E. Fowler Ph.D.

Journal of Digital Forensics, Security and Law

Lossless compression of memory dumps from virtual machines that run malware samples is considered with the goal of significantly reducing archival costs in dynamic-malware-analysis applications. Given that, in such dynamic-analysis scenarios, malware samples are typically run in virtual machines just long enough to activate any self-decryption or other detection- avoidance maneuvers, the virtual-machine memory typically changes little from that of the baseline state, with the difference being attributable in large degree to the loading of additional executables and libraries. Consequently, delta coding is proposed to compress the current virtual-machine memory dump by coding its differences with respect to a predicted ...


Civil Liberty Or National Security: The Battle Over Iphone Encryption, Karen Lowell 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

Civil Liberty Or National Security: The Battle Over Iphone Encryption, Karen Lowell

Georgia State University Law Review

On June 5, 2013, Edward Snowden released what would be the first of many documents exposing the vast breadth of electronic surveillance the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA) had been conducting on millions of United States citizens. Although the federal agencies had legal authority under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) to collect metadata from companies such as Verizon, many Americans considered this data collection to be a massive invasion of privacy.

Equipped with the knowledge of sweeping domestic surveillance programs, citizens and technology firms fighting for strong privacy and security protection, have started ...


Having An Affair May Shorten Your Life: The Ashley Madison Suicides, Sakinah N. Jones 2017 Georgia State University College of Law

Having An Affair May Shorten Your Life: The Ashley Madison Suicides, Sakinah N. Jones

Georgia State University Law Review

Ashley Madison is an online dating service originally designed for people in committed relationships who want to cheat on their partners. In 2015, the website claimed to be “100% discreet.” Ashley Madison’s FAQs promised that its users would never compromise their “safety, privacy or security” and would never have to reveal their identities unless they chose to.

Ashley Madison’s concept attracted over forty million ostensibly anonymous members to its site. In July 2015, a group calling itself The Impact Team (Impact) hacked into Ashley Madison’s parent company, Avid Life Media, Inc. (Avid Life), breaching its security walls ...


Enjoying Your "Free" App? The First Circuit's Approach To An Outdated Law In Yershov V. Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc., Wendy Beylik 2017 Boston College Law School

Enjoying Your "Free" App? The First Circuit's Approach To An Outdated Law In Yershov V. Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc., Wendy Beylik

Boston College Law Review

On April 29, 2016, in Yershov v. Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc. (“Yershov II”), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held that the Video Privacy Protection Act (“VPPA”) of 1988 extended to a free application provider who disclosed its users’ GPS coordinates, phone identification numbers, and video histories to a data analytics company. In a similar case, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held that the VPPA did not apply because the relationship was too weak to render the user a “subscriber” under the Act. The U.S. Court of Appeals for ...


Ni Si, Ni No, Sino Todo Lo Contrario: El Tribunal Electoral, La Iglesia Católica Y La Imposible Nulidad De La Elección De Gobernador En Aguascalientes, Javier Martín Reyes 2017 Columbia University

Ni Si, Ni No, Sino Todo Lo Contrario: El Tribunal Electoral, La Iglesia Católica Y La Imposible Nulidad De La Elección De Gobernador En Aguascalientes, Javier Martín Reyes

Javier Martín Reyes

En el presente artículo se realiza un análisis crítico de la sentencia de la Sala Superior del Tribunal Electoral del Poder Judicial de la Federación (TEPJF) mediante la cual validó la elección de Gobernador de Aguascalientes de 2016. En este asunto, la Sala acreditó plenamente que el Obispo de Aguascalientes y otros ministros de culto intervinieron de manera ilegal en la contienda electoral, violando con ello los principios de laicidad y de separación del Estado y las iglesias. No obstante lo anterior, para la mayoría de la Sala Superior estas violaciones no fueron ni graves ni determinantes y, en consecuencia ...


Will Quants Rule The (Legal) World?, Edward K. Cheng 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Will Quants Rule The (Legal) World?, Edward K. Cheng

Edward Cheng

The quants are coming! And they are here to stay-so argues Professor Ian Ayres' in his new book, Super Crunchers, which details the brave new world of statistical prediction and how it has already begun to affect our lives. For years, academic researchers have known about the considerable and at times surprising advantages of statistical models over the considered judgments of experienced clinicians and experts. Today, these models are emerging all over the landscape. Whether the field is wine, baseball, medicine, or consumer relations, they are vying against traditional experts for control over how we make decisions. To be sure ...


Standing In The Future: The Case For A Substantial Risk Theory Of "Injury-In-Fact" In Consumer Data Breach Class Actions, Nicholas Green 2017 Boston College Law School

Standing In The Future: The Case For A Substantial Risk Theory Of "Injury-In-Fact" In Consumer Data Breach Class Actions, Nicholas Green

Boston College Law Review

The increasing digitalization of our personal and professional lives has generated corresponding growth in the amount of electronically stored private information in the hands of third parties. That private information is at risk of theft, loss, or manipulation. Employers that hold employee tax information and merchants that hold significant troves of consumer credit card data are particularly attractive targets. When hackers strike, victims often band together in federal class actions, naming the custodians of their private data as defendants. More and more, however, district courts are dismissing these class action claims at the doorstep for lack of Article III standing ...


Pass Parallel Privacy Standards Or Privacy Perishes, Anne T. McKenna 2017 Penn State Law

Pass Parallel Privacy Standards Or Privacy Perishes, Anne T. Mckenna

Anne T. McKenna

No abstract provided.


Problems With Using Statistics To Justify Institutional Policies, Justin Shin 2017 Bard College

Problems With Using Statistics To Justify Institutional Policies, Justin Shin

Senior Projects Spring 2017

It is becoming increasingly common for institutions to use statistics to inform policy decisions. We should be prepared to ask ourselves what regulatory principles should be imposed on institutions that seek to justify certain policies through deference to a statistical analysis. This paper will examine the difficulties that come with using statistics to justify actions, and argue that certain standards of transparency and verifiability should be expected from any institution that seeks to involve a statistical analysis in the formation of policies. I will first use Market Share Liability, an established use of statistics, to draw out what responsibilities an ...


Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi 2017 John Marshall Law School

Blocking Ad Blockers, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 272 (2017), Tyler Barbacovi

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

The prevalence of ad blocking software (software that prevents the loading of web based advertisements) is a growing problem for website owners and content creators who rely on advertising revenue to earn money. While the number of ad block users continues to increase, there has thus far been no significant legal challenge to ad blocking in the United States. This comment examines how a website owner, through a combination of technological improvements and the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, could successfully raise a legal challenge against the purveyors of ad blocking software.


Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja 2017 John Marshall Law School

Commercial Creations: The Role Of End User License Agreements In Controlling The Exploitation Of User Generated Content, 16 J. Marshall Rev. Intell. Prop. L. 382 (2017), Neha Ahuja

The John Marshall Review of Intellectual Property Law

This article considers the current licensing regime used to control the exploitation of copyright protected works within the online interactive entertainment sector—particularly virtual worlds including multiplayer online games—to further author new copyrightable works. This article aims to identify the gaps that have arisen on account of the nature of these subsequently authored works and the potential for their exploitation under the said licensing regime. Users and the proprietors of virtual worlds often end up in conflict over the monetization and commercialization of user generated content on account of contradictory yet overlapping rights created by copyright law when controlled ...


Making Democracy Harder To Hack, Scott Shackelford, Bruce Schneier, Michael Sulmeyer, Anne Boustead, Ben Buchanan, Amanda N. Craig Deckard, Trey Herr, Jessica Malekos Smith 2017 Indiana University Kelley School of Business

Making Democracy Harder To Hack, Scott Shackelford, Bruce Schneier, Michael Sulmeyer, Anne Boustead, Ben Buchanan, Amanda N. Craig Deckard, Trey Herr, Jessica Malekos Smith

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

With the Russian government hack of the Democratic National Convention email servers and related leaks, the drama of the 2016 U.S. presidential race highlights an important point: nefarious hackers do not just pose a risk to vulnerable companies; cyber attacks can potentially impact the trajectory of democracies. Yet a consensus has been slow to emerge as to the desirability and feasibility of reclassifying elections—in particular, voting machines—as critical infrastructure, due in part to the long history of local and state control of voting procedures. This Article takes on the debate—focusing on policy options beyond former Department ...


Siri-Ously 2.0: What Artificial Intelligence Reveals About The First Amendment, Toni M. Massaro, Helen Norton, Margot E. Kaminski 2017 University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law

Siri-Ously 2.0: What Artificial Intelligence Reveals About The First Amendment, Toni M. Massaro, Helen Norton, Margot E. Kaminski

Articles

The First Amendment may protect speech by strong Artificial Intelligence (AI). In this Article, we support this provocative claim by expanding on earlier work, addressing significant concerns and challenges, and suggesting potential paths forward.

This is not a claim about the state of technology. Whether strong AI — as-yet-hypothetical machines that can actually think — will ever come to exist remains far from clear. It is instead a claim that discussing AI speech sheds light on key features of prevailing First Amendment doctrine and theory, including the surprising lack of humanness at its core.

Courts and commentators wrestling with free speech problems ...


Every Algorithm Has A Pov, Susan Nevelow Mart 2017 University of Colorado Law School

Every Algorithm Has A Pov, Susan Nevelow Mart

Articles

When legal researchers search in online databases for the information they need to solve a legal problem, they need to remember that the algorithms that are returning results to them were designed by humans. The world of legal research is a human-constructed world, and the biases and assumptions the teams of humans that construct the online world bring to the task are imported into the systems we use for research. This article takes a look at what happens when six different teams of humans set out to solve the same problem: how to return results relevant to a searcher’s ...


The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart 2017 University of Colorado Law School

The Algorithm As A Human Artifact: Implications For Legal [Re]Search, Susan Nevelow Mart

Articles

The results of using the search algorithms in Westlaw, Lexis Advance, Fastcase, Google Scholar, Ravel, and Casetext are compared. Six groups of humans created six different algorithms, and the results are a testament to the variability of human problem solving. That variability has implications both for researching and teaching research.


Clicks And Tricks: How Computer Hackers Avoid 10b-5 Liability, Ryan H. Gilinson 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Clicks And Tricks: How Computer Hackers Avoid 10b-5 Liability, Ryan H. Gilinson

Brooklyn Law Review

This note argues that computer hackers who sell inside information instead of trading on it themselves, referred to in the note as hacker-sellers, avoid liability under Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act and SEC Rule 10b-5. Rule 10b-5 criminalizes the use of a manipulative or deceptive device “in connection with the purchase or sale of any security.” Hacker-sellers fall outside the scope of this rule for two reasons. First, the type of hacking employed by hacker-sellers is not always “deceptive,” and only the forms of hacking which deceive the computer into thinking an authorized user is seeking access ...


Cannibal Cop Out: The Computer Fraud And Abuse Act, Lenity, Quasi-Strict Liability, Draconian Punishment And A Surgical Solution, Charles S. Wood 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Cannibal Cop Out: The Computer Fraud And Abuse Act, Lenity, Quasi-Strict Liability, Draconian Punishment And A Surgical Solution, Charles S. Wood

Brooklyn Law Review

The Second Circuit has recently joined in a longstanding circuit split regarding the interpretation of the phrase “exceeds authorized access” under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). The split centers around whether an otherwise authorized computer user who violates usage restrictions has exceeded authorized access. In United States v. Valle, the Second Circuit answered the question in the negative. Upon finding the phrase to be ambiguous, the Second Circuit invoked lenity, and therefore narrowly construed their interpretation in the defendant’s favor. This note argues that the Second Circuit was correct to apply lenity as the plain meaning of ...


Transforming Election Cybersecurity, David P. Fidler 2017 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

Transforming Election Cybersecurity, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


The U.S. Election Hacks, Cybersecurity, And International Law, David P. Fidler 2017 Indiana University Maurer School of Law

The U.S. Election Hacks, Cybersecurity, And International Law, David P. Fidler

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Lessons For Policymakers And Regulators On The (Predictable) Future Of The Digital Economy, Kevin Werbach 2017 University of Pennsylvania

Lessons For Policymakers And Regulators On The (Predictable) Future Of The Digital Economy, Kevin Werbach

Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative

The next stage in the evolution of the digital economy involves the creation of what can be called the “Internet of the World”—an expanding web of transactions, anticipated today by on-demand platforms such as Uber and Airbnb, that eventually will occur across trillions of networked devices and penetrate every sphere of human activity. This brief looks at the many legal questions raised by these novel services, in particular, at the regulatory classification of on-demand services, as well as the application of antitrust provisions, the imposition of taxes and fees, and the assignment of liability to these new platforms.


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