Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Comparative and Foreign Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

9760 Full-Text Articles 6781 Authors 3781436 Downloads 128 Institutions

All Articles in Comparative and Foreign Law

Faceted Search

9760 full-text articles. Page 227 of 238.

Rethinking The Separation Of Ownership From Management In American History, Kenneth Lipartito, Yumiko Morii 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Rethinking The Separation Of Ownership From Management In American History, Kenneth Lipartito, Yumiko Morii

Seattle University Law Review

In <em>The Modern Corporation and Private Property</em>, Adolf Berle and Gardiner Means would use AT&T as a prime example of what they saw as a dangerous new trend, the replacement of ownership-based capitalism with giant corporations controlled by a small group of propertyless managers. Indeed, AT&T became Berle and Means’ favorite example. . . . As we ...


The Modern Corporation As Social Construction, Mark S. Mizruchi, Daniel Hirschman 2010 Seattle University School of Law

The Modern Corporation As Social Construction, Mark S. Mizruchi, Daniel Hirschman

Seattle University Law Review

Classic works, Mark Mizruchi and Lisa Fein argued, share a particular fate. Authors often cite classic works without reading them—or without reading them carefully. . . . Yet perhaps no single work fits the above description better than one of the most important books on the large corporation ever published: Adolf Berle and Gardiner Means’s The Modern Corporation and Private Property. One can speculate that few works in the social sciences have been as often cited and as little read. As a consequence, we would expect The Modern Corporation to be a good candidate for either selective interpretation or outright misinterpretation ...


Corporate Power In The Public Eye: Reassessing The Implications Of Berle’S Public Consensus Theory, Marc T. Moore, Antoine Rebérioux 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Corporate Power In The Public Eye: Reassessing The Implications Of Berle’S Public Consensus Theory, Marc T. Moore, Antoine Rebérioux

Seattle University Law Review

We analyze Berle’s overall corporate governance project in accordance with what we see as its four core sub-themes: (A) the limitations of external market forces as a constraint on managerial decision-making power; (B) the desirability of internal (corporate) over external (market) actors in allocating corporate capital; (C) civil society and the public consensus as a continuous informal check on managerial decision-making power; and (D) shareholder democracy (as opposed to shareholder primacy or shareholder wealth maximization) as a socially instrumental institution. We seek to debunk the popular misconception that Berle’s early work was a defense of the orthodox shareholder ...


Berle And The Entrepreneur, Charles R.T. O'Kelley 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Berle And The Entrepreneur, Charles R.T. O'Kelley

Seattle University Law Review

In the first and last four chapters (“the Five Chapters”) of The Modern Corporation and Private Property, Adolf Berle, Jr. describes in sweeping terms a fundamental transformation of the American economy. . . . Writing more than ten years before Berle, another seminal scholar, Frank Knight . . . developed a theory of the entrepreneur as part of his larger effort to more carefully explain the theoretical underpinnings of a free-market economy. . . . Given Knight’s prominence and the fact that Knight apparently reached dramatically different conclusions than did Berle concerning the consequences flowing from separation of ownership and control, it is initially surprising to discover that ...


Berle’S Vision Beyond Shareholder Interests: Why Investment Bankers Should Have (Some) Personal Liability, Claire Hill, Richard Painter 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Berle’S Vision Beyond Shareholder Interests: Why Investment Bankers Should Have (Some) Personal Liability, Claire Hill, Richard Painter

Seattle University Law Review

This essay, published in a symposium on the work of Adolf Berle, approaches the Berle-Dodd debate from the perspective that corporate managers have responsibilities beyond pursuing the interests of shareholders. Stock based executive compensation, designed to align managers’ interests with those of shareholders, has, in the investment banking industry in particular, failed to avert, and may have caused, managers (in this case, bankers) to take excessive risks that in the present financial crisis inflicted great damage on creditors and on society as a whole. We describe here the broad outlines of a proposal that we will discuss in future publications ...


Enumerating Old Themes? Berle’S Concept Of Ownership And The Historical Development Of English Company Law In Context, Lorraine E. Talbot 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Enumerating Old Themes? Berle’S Concept Of Ownership And The Historical Development Of English Company Law In Context, Lorraine E. Talbot

Seattle University Law Review

This paper offers some tentative suggestions as to why Berle’s work has been read and interpreted so selectively in the United Kingdom. I suggest that this must be partly attributable to the historical developments in English company law that entrenched the notion of shareholder ownership claims. Specifically, unincorporated associations’ normative values—that members are owners and there is no distinction between small organizations with no share dispersal and large organizations with wide share dispersal—have a continuing influence on this entrenched notion of shareholder ownership claims. First, I provide an overview of the origins of English company law. Next ...


Neo-Brandeisianism And The New Deal: Adolf A. Berle, Jr., William O. Douglas, And The Problem Of Corporate Finance In The 1930s, Jessica Wang 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Neo-Brandeisianism And The New Deal: Adolf A. Berle, Jr., William O. Douglas, And The Problem Of Corporate Finance In The 1930s, Jessica Wang

Seattle University Law Review

This essay revisits Adolf A. Berle, Jr. and The Modern Corporation and Private Property by focusing on the triangle of Berle, Louis D. Brandeis, and William O. Douglas in order to examine some of the underlying assumptions about law, economics, and the nature of modern society behind securities regulation and corporate finance in the 1930s. I explore Douglas and Berle’s academic and political relationship, the conceptual underpinnings of Brandeis, Berle, and Douglas’s critiques of modern finance, and the ways in which the two younger men—Berle and Douglas—ultimately departed from their role model, Brandeis.


The Birth Of Corporate Governance, Harwell Wells 2010 Seattle University School of Law

The Birth Of Corporate Governance, Harwell Wells

Seattle University Law Review

Part I of this Article briefly examines the concept of “corporate governance” and argues for dating the concept’s origins to the debates of the 1920s. Part II then moves on to examine early scholarly and popular discussions of the separation of ownership and control. After surveying the historical developments that produced the recognizably modern corporate economy around the turn of the century, it examines early scholarly and popular discussions of the separation of ownership and control, focusing on three major thinkers, Louis D. Brandeis, Walter Lippmann, and Thorstein Veblen. It argues that, while each of these authors examined the ...


Zakat: Drawing Insights For Legal Theory And Economic Policy From Islamic Jurisprudence, Russell Powell 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Zakat: Drawing Insights For Legal Theory And Economic Policy From Islamic Jurisprudence, Russell Powell

Faculty Scholarship

The rapid development of complex income taxation and welfare systems in the 20th century may give the impression that progressive wealth redistribution systems are uniquely modern. However, religious systems provided similar mechanisms for addressing economic injustice and poverty alleviation centuries earlier. Zakat is the obligation of almsgiving and is the third pillar of Islam - a requirement for all believers. In the early development of the Islamic community, zakat was collected as a tax by the state and the funds were distributed to a defined set of needy groups. As a theoretical matter, there are three insights that make zakat an ...


The Study Of Secularism And Religion In The Constitution And Contemporary Politics Of Turkey: The Rise Of Interdisciplinarity And The Decline Of Methodology?, Russell Powell 2010 Seattle University School of Law

The Study Of Secularism And Religion In The Constitution And Contemporary Politics Of Turkey: The Rise Of Interdisciplinarity And The Decline Of Methodology?, Russell Powell

Faculty Scholarship

Using the experience of Islamist parties in Turkey as a comparative example, this article explores whether political parties with deeply held religious ideologies can integrate themselves into liberal democracies, paying particular attention to the nature and role of legal secularism (the mechanism states use to insulate themselves from religious influence). This is an extension of the query whether the rise of illiberal political groups eventually leads to the end of liberal society. These queries engage the assumption that illiberal religious ideology is incapable of tolerating dissent or pluralism. This article examines Turkish constitutional secularism as well as the “Islamist” Justice ...


Korea's Patent Policy And Its Impact On Economic Development: A Model For Emerging Countries?, Jay Erstling 2010 Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Korea's Patent Policy And Its Impact On Economic Development: A Model For Emerging Countries?, Jay Erstling

Faculty Scholarship

The purpose of this paper will be to examine Korean patent policy as exemplified by its patent legislation and the activities of Korean Intellectual Property Office (KIPO). Part II will take a brief look at the rationale underpinning Korea's confidence in the power of the patent system to stimulate economic growth. Part III of the paper will look at the Korean Patent Act as an example of strong, comprehensive patent legislation that fully complies with international standards and responds well to the perceived needs of patent applicants. In order to provide a basis of comparison, reference will be made ...


Transplanting Antitrust In China: Economic Transition, Market Structure, And State Control, Wentong Zheng 2010 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Transplanting Antitrust In China: Economic Transition, Market Structure, And State Control, Wentong Zheng

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article examines the compatibility of Western antitrust models as incorporated in China's first comprehensive antitrust law – the Antimonopoly Law ("AML") – with China's local conditions. It identifies three forces that shape competition law and policy in China: China's current transitional stage, China's market structures, and pervasive state control in China's economy. This Article discusses how these forces have limited the applicability of Western antitrust models to China in three major areas of antitrust: cartels, abuse of dominant market position, and merger review. Specifically, it details how these forces have prevented China from pursuing a rigorous ...


The Discursive Failure In Comparative Tax Law, Omri Y. Marian 2010 University of Florida Levin College of Law

The Discursive Failure In Comparative Tax Law, Omri Y. Marian

UF Law Faculty Publications

Tax comparatists tend to bemoan the grim status of their chosen field. Complaints are aimed both at the scarcity of decent comparative legal tax scholarship, and at the lack of a theoretical foundation for the study of comparative tax law. The purpose of this Article is to portray a more sanguine, yet critical, view of this field. Sanguine, since a sympathetic reading of contemporary comparative tax scholarship demonstrates that there is more than enough such scholarship to generate a lively debate on comparative tax works and their methodologies. Critical, since all of these works fail to produce even the faintest ...


Personal Jurisdiction Over Non-Resident Class Members: Have We Gone Down The Wrong Road?, Tanya Monestier 2010 Roger Williams University School of Law

Personal Jurisdiction Over Non-Resident Class Members: Have We Gone Down The Wrong Road?, Tanya Monestier

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Comparison Of The Handling Of The Financial Crisis In The United States, The United Kingdom, And Australia, Elizabeth F. Brown 2010 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

A Comparison Of The Handling Of The Financial Crisis In The United States, The United Kingdom, And Australia, Elizabeth F. Brown

Villanova Law Review

The article discusses how the U.S., Great Britain and Australia handled the financial crisis, as of July 2010. It analyzes the reasons why Australia was less affected by the crisis than the U.S. and Great Britain. The author suggests that the U.S. would perform well to adopt a Twin Peaks Model which creates two agencies that regulate a broad range of financial entities but focus on narrow goals.


Four Challenges To Financial Regulatory Reform, Eric J. Pan 2010 Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law

Four Challenges To Financial Regulatory Reform, Eric J. Pan

Villanova Law Review

The article discusses the challenges that should be addressed in a successful financial regulatory reform. These challenges include the structuring of regulatory systems, separation of prudential supervision and consumer protection regulation, the entity responsible for monitoring and managing systemic risk, and the supervision of cross-border financial services and transactions. The reform proposals considered by Great Britain, the U.S., and European Union are analyzed.


Opportunities And Challenges For Gender-Based Legal Reform In China, Rangita de Silva de Alwis 2010 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Opportunities And Challenges For Gender-Based Legal Reform In China, Rangita De Silva De Alwis

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Path Not Taken: Hans Kelsen's Pure Theory Of Law In The Land Of Legal Realists, D. A. Jeremy Telman 2010 Valparaiso University School of Law

A Path Not Taken: Hans Kelsen's Pure Theory Of Law In The Land Of Legal Realists, D. A. Jeremy Telman

Law Faculty Publications

This Essay is a contribution to a volume on the influence of Hans Kelsen’s legal theory in over a dozen countries. The Essay offers four explanations for the failure of Kelsen’s pure theory of law to take hold in the United States. Part I covers the argument that Kelsen’s approach failed in the United States because it is inferior to H. L. A. Hart’s brand of legal positivism. Part II discusses the historical context in which Kelsen taught and published in the United States and explores both philosophical and sociological reasons why the legal academy in ...


Plural Vision: International Law Seen Through The Varied Lenses Of Domestic Implementation, D. A. Jeremy Telman 2010 Valparaiso University School of Law

Plural Vision: International Law Seen Through The Varied Lenses Of Domestic Implementation, D. A. Jeremy Telman

Law Faculty Publications

This Essay introduces a collection of essays that have evolved from papers presented at a conference on “International Law in the Domestic Context.” The conference was a response to the questions raised by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Medellín v. Texas and also a product of our collective curiosity about how other states address tensions between international obligations and overlapping regimes of national law.

Our constitutional tradition speaks with many voices on the subject of the relationship between domestic and international law. In order to gain a broader perspective on that relationship, we invited experts on foreign ...


Firms As Social Actors, Richard Adelstein 2010 Wesleyan University

Firms As Social Actors, Richard Adelstein

Division II Faculty Publications

A close look at what firms are and how they act.


Digital Commons powered by bepress