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Foreword: The Books Of Justices, Linda Greenhouse 2017 Yale Law School

Foreword: The Books Of Justices, Linda Greenhouse

Michigan Law Review

For this Michigan Law Review issue devoted to recently published books about law, I thought it would be interesting to see what books made an appearance in the past year’s work of the Supreme Court. I catalogued every citation to every book in those forty opinions in order to see what patterns emerged: what books the justices cited, which justices cited which books, and what use they made of the citations. To begin with, I should define what I mean by “books". For the purposes of this Foreword, I excluded some types of reading matter that may have a ...


Self-Driving Cars: Autonomous Technology That Needs A Designated Duty Passenger, Michelle L.D. Hanlon 2017 Barry University School of Law

Self-Driving Cars: Autonomous Technology That Needs A Designated Duty Passenger, Michelle L.D. Hanlon

Barry Law Review

No abstract provided.


Contemplating Masterpiece Cakeshop, Terri R. Day 2017 Barry University

Contemplating Masterpiece Cakeshop, Terri R. Day

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Agency Law And The New Economy, Mark J. Loewenstein 2017 University of Colorado Law School

Agency Law And The New Economy, Mark J. Loewenstein

Articles

This article considers the status of workers in the "new economy," defined as the sharing economy (e.g., Uber, Lyft) and the on-demand economy. The latter refers to the extensive and growing use of staffing companies by established businesses in many different industries to provide all or a portion of their workforce. Workers in both the sharing economy and the on-demand economy are, generally speaking, at a disadvantage in comparison to traditional employees. Uber drivers, for example, are typically considered independent contractors, not employees, and therefore are not covered under federal and state laws that protect or provide benefits to ...


Putting The Substance Back Into The Economic Substance Doctrine, Nicholas Giordano 2017 Brooklyn Law School

Putting The Substance Back Into The Economic Substance Doctrine, Nicholas Giordano

Brooklyn Journal of Corporate, Financial & Commercial Law

The foreign tax credit, which saves U.S. taxpayers from paying both foreign and domestic income taxes on the same income, is critical to facilitating global commerce. However, as savvy taxpayers discover increasingly complicated ways to abuse the foreign tax credit regime through the structuring of business transactions, courts have become increasingly skeptical of the validity of those transactions. Using the economic substance doctrine, a common law doctrine codified in 2010 at I.R.C. § 7701(o), courts will disallow tax benefits stemming from a transaction that is not profitable absent its tax benefits, and which the taxpayer had no ...


Directv, Inc. V. Imburgia And The Continued Ascendance Of Federal Common Law: Class-Action Waivers And Mandatory Arbitration Under The Federal Arbitration Act, Michael Yelnosky 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Directv, Inc. V. Imburgia And The Continued Ascendance Of Federal Common Law: Class-Action Waivers And Mandatory Arbitration Under The Federal Arbitration Act, Michael Yelnosky

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Franchise Tax Board Of California V. Hyatt: A Split Court, Full Faith And Credit, And Federal Common Law, Jonathan M. Gutoff 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Franchise Tax Board Of California V. Hyatt: A Split Court, Full Faith And Credit, And Federal Common Law, Jonathan M. Gutoff

Roger Williams University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Choice Of Law And Jurisdictional Policy In The Federal Courts, Tobias Barrington Wolff 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Choice Of Law And Jurisdictional Policy In The Federal Courts, Tobias Barrington Wolff

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

For seventy-five years, Klaxon v. Stentor Electric Manufacturing has provided a one-line answer to choice-of-law questions in federal diversity cases: Erie requires the federal court to employ the same law that a court of the state would select. The simplicity of the proposition likely accounts for the unqualified breadth with which federal courts now apply it. Choice of law doctrine is difficult, consensus in hard cases is elusive, and the anxiety that Erie produces over the demands of federalism tends to stifle any reexamination of core assumptions. The attraction of a simple answer is obvious. But Klaxon cannot bear the ...


Franchise Tax Board Of California V. Hyatt: A Split Court, Full Faith And Credit, And Federal Common Law, Jonathan M. Gutoff 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Franchise Tax Board Of California V. Hyatt: A Split Court, Full Faith And Credit, And Federal Common Law, Jonathan M. Gutoff

Law Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A New History Of Waste Law: How A Misunderstood Doctrine Shaped Ideas About The Transformation Of Law, Jill M. Fraley 2017 Washington and Lee School of Law

A New History Of Waste Law: How A Misunderstood Doctrine Shaped Ideas About The Transformation Of Law, Jill M. Fraley

Marquette Law Review

In the traditional account, American courts transformed the law of waste, radically diverging from the British courts around the time of the American Revolution. Some of the most influential theorists of American legal history have used this account as evidence that American law is driven by economics. Due to its adoption by influential scholars, this traditional account of waste law has shaped not only our understanding of property law, but also how we view the process of transforming law.

That traditional account, however, came not from a history of the doctrine, but from an elaboration of the benefits of the ...


An Ghaoth A Chriofidh An Eorna: The Moral Economy Of Ireland's Whiteboys, 1761-1787., Connor Bartlett McDermott 2017 Bard College

An Ghaoth A Chriofidh An Eorna: The Moral Economy Of Ireland's Whiteboys, 1761-1787., Connor Bartlett Mcdermott

Senior Projects Spring 2017

In 1761, the peasantry of Ireland rose in insurrection against enclosure and tithes. The initial wave of protesters were known as 'Whiteboys,' and their insurrection came to be a model for subsequent Irish agrarian redresser movements throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth century. Applying E.P. Thompson’s theory of moral economy to the practice of Whiteboyism reveals the sophisticated motives which lay behind the Whiteboy’s 18th century protests against enclosure, tithes, and middlemen in rural Ireland. Senior Project submitted to The Division of Social Studies of Bard College.


The Value Of The Restatement Of Employment Law, Based On 50-State Empirical Analyses And The Importance Of Clarifying Disputed Issues – But With Caveats About The Restatement’S Imperfect Work Product, Scott A. Moss 2017 University of Colorado Law School

The Value Of The Restatement Of Employment Law, Based On 50-State Empirical Analyses And The Importance Of Clarifying Disputed Issues – But With Caveats About The Restatement’S Imperfect Work Product, Scott A. Moss

Articles

No abstract provided.


Directv, Inc. V. Imburgia And The Continued Ascendance Of Federal Common Law: Class-Action Waivers And Mandatory Arbitration Under The Federal Arbitration Act, Michael J. Yelnosky 2017 Roger Williams University School of Law

Directv, Inc. V. Imburgia And The Continued Ascendance Of Federal Common Law: Class-Action Waivers And Mandatory Arbitration Under The Federal Arbitration Act, Michael J. Yelnosky

Roger Williams University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Jailhouse Informants In Canadian Criminal Courts, Olena Beshley 2017 Wilfrid Laurier University

Jailhouse Informants In Canadian Criminal Courts, Olena Beshley

Theses and Dissertations (Comprehensive)

Criminal justice systems in Canada and around the world have been established to deal with matters that require attention, punishment, and justice. An important function of criminal justice systems is the evaluation of evidence presented in the court of law. Evidence from jailhouse informants who testify that they have been privy to confessions of crimes is a contentious issue. Much of the scholarly literature available to date on wrongful conviction cases focuses on causes of insufficient and unreliable evidence obtained through different techniques and from different sources. Despite the high number of investigations into wrongful conviction cases, the subject of ...


Tradition And Culture In Africa: Practices That Facilitate Trafficking Of Women And Children, Norah Hashim Msuya 2017 Mzumbe University

Tradition And Culture In Africa: Practices That Facilitate Trafficking Of Women And Children, Norah Hashim Msuya

Dignity: A Journal on Sexual Exploitation and Violence

Many states in Africa have adopted legislative, administrative and institutional measures to combat trafficking in human beings. These measures include, among other things, the formulation and implementation of both national and regional action plans by African states to provide for comprehensive and coordinated interventions. Many African countries have also enacted an anti-trafficking legislation at the country level. Despite these measures, African women and children have been trafficked annually worldwide for purposes of forced labor, sexual exploitation, and domestic servitude. Additionally, women and children are trafficked within their countries from rural to urban areas. Misconception and abuse of African tradition and ...


The Law Of Interpretation, William Baude, Stephen E. Sachs 2017 Duke Law School

The Law Of Interpretation, William Baude, Stephen E. Sachs

Faculty Scholarship

How should we interpret legal instruments? How do we identify the law they create? Current approaches largely fall into two broad camps. The standard picture of interpretation is focused on language, using various linguistic conventions to discover a document's meaning or a drafter's intent. Those who see language as less determinate take a more skeptical view, urging judges to make interpretive choices on policy grounds. Yet both approaches neglect the most important resource available: the already applicable rules of law.

Legal interpretation is neither a subfield of linguistics nor an exercise in policymaking. Rather, it is deeply shaped ...


Understanding Insurance Policies As Noncontracts: An Alternative Approach To Drafting And Construing These Unique Financial Instruments, Christopher French 2016 Penn State Law

Understanding Insurance Policies As Noncontracts: An Alternative Approach To Drafting And Construing These Unique Financial Instruments, Christopher French

Christopher C. French

Insurance policies commonly are understood to be a species of standardized contracts. This Article challenges that conventional wisdom and argues that insurance policies do not actually qualify as contracts under the doctrinal and theoretical bases of contract formation. It examines the process by which insurance policies are created and sold, and measures that process against the requirements for contract formation. This Article also distinguishes insurance policies from other types of standardized contracts, such as wrap agreements, which currently are the subject of much litigation and scholarly commentary. It then explores the doctrinal and theoretical bases underlying the specialized rules that ...


The Spirit Of Common Law And The Reform Of Canon Law, Ladislas M. Orsy, S.J. 2016 St. John's University School of Law

The Spirit Of Common Law And The Reform Of Canon Law, Ladislas M. Orsy, S.J.

The Catholic Lawyer

No abstract provided.


The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity, Paul F. Figley, Jay Tidmarsh 2016 Washington College of Law, American University

The Appropriations Power And Sovereign Immunity, Paul F. Figley, Jay Tidmarsh

Paul Figley

Discussions of sovereign immunity assume that the Constitution contains no explicit text regarding sovereign immunity. As a result, arguments about the existence-or nonexistence-of sovereign immunity begin with the English and American common-law doctrines. Exploring political, fiscal, and legal developments in England and the American colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, this Article shows that focusing on common-law developments is misguided. The common-law approach to sovereign immunity ended in the early 1700s. The Bankers' Case (1690- 1700), which is often regarded as the first modern common-law treatment of sovereign immunity, is in fact the last in the line of English ...


The Case Of Natural Obligations, David V. Snyder 2016 Indiana University School of Law - Bloomington

The Case Of Natural Obligations, David V. Snyder

David Snyder

No abstract provided.


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