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Extraterritoriality In Common Law Climate Actions: Judicial Restraint Or Judicial Error?, Aaron B. Rudyan 2020 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Extraterritoriality In Common Law Climate Actions: Judicial Restraint Or Judicial Error?, Aaron B. Rudyan

Pace Environmental Law Review

No abstract provided.


Redefining Tribal Sovereignty For The Era Of Fundamental Rights, Michael Doran 2020 University of Virginia

Redefining Tribal Sovereignty For The Era Of Fundamental Rights, Michael Doran

Indiana Law Journal

This Article explains a longstanding problem in federal Indian law. For two centuries, the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly acknowledged the retained, inherent sovereignty of American Indian tribes. But more recently, the Court has developed the implicit-divestiture theory to deny tribal governments criminal and civil jurisdiction over nonmembers, even with respect to activities on tribal lands. Legal scholars have puzzled over this move from a territorial-based definition of tribal sovereignty to a membership-based definition; they have variously explained it as the Court’s abandonment of the foundational principles of Indian law, the product of the Court’s indifference or ...


An Examination Of How The Canadian Military's Legal System Responds To Sexual Assault, Elaine Craig 2020 Dalhousie University Schulich School of Law

An Examination Of How The Canadian Military's Legal System Responds To Sexual Assault, Elaine Craig

Dalhousie Law Journal

Although the Canadian military has been conducting sexual assault trials for over twenty years, there has been no academic study of them and no external review of them. This review of the military’s sexual assault cases (the first of its kind) yields several important findings. First, the conviction rate for the offence of sexual assault by courts martial is dramatically lower than the rate in Canada’s civilian criminal courts. The difference between acquittal rates in sexual assault cases in these two systems appears to be even larger. Since Operation Honour was launched in 2015 only one soldier has ...


Intervenors At The Supreme Court Of Canada, Geoffrey D. Callaghan 2020 Laurier University, Law and Society Program

Intervenors At The Supreme Court Of Canada, Geoffrey D. Callaghan

Dalhousie Law Journal

My aim in this paper is to offer a normatively attractive and explanatorily sound interpretation of the Supreme Court of Canada’s approach to third party intervention. The crux of my interpretation is that the policy the Court has developed on intervenors allows it to strike a reasonable balance among a number of competing democratic considerations, all of which have value in the context of judicial decision making. In this respect, the Court should be commended for identifying a way to liberalize a practice that possesses many democratically-attractive features, but also the inherent capacity to undermine the democratic standing of ...


The Unwavering Movement: Integrating Reason Into British Penal Code 1730-1823, Rebecca M. Good 2019 Bowling Green State University

The Unwavering Movement: Integrating Reason Into British Penal Code 1730-1823, Rebecca M. Good

International ResearchScape Journal

Between the early 16th and 18th centuries, English attitude towards crime and correction were based on the strong held belief that faith and religion were the only cure to immorality. Lawmakers began to threaten citizens with capital punishment for menial crimes such as petty theft and begging. Resulting of a moral panic, lawmakers turned to the deterrence to dissuade citizens from partaking in criminal activity. The list of crimes punishable by death in England rose from 50 offenses in 1688 to over 220 in 1815. This article explains the origins of the Bloody Code and how Enlightenment-Era thought ...


The General Knowledge, Skill, And Experience Paradox, Camilla A. Hrdy 2019 University of Akron School of Law

The General Knowledge, Skill, And Experience Paradox, Camilla A. Hrdy

Boston College Law Review

Can employers use trade secret law to prevent employees from using knowledge and skills they acquired on the job? Courts in all fifty states say no—an employee’s general knowledge, skill, and experience cannot be protected as a trade secret. Yet a benchmark principle of trade secret law is that employers can share trade secrets with employees so long as they take reasonable measures to preserve the information’s secrecy. The result is a paradox that runs to the heart of trade secret law: employers are encouraged to communicate trade secrets to employees, but this information loses protection if ...


In Search Of The Common Law Inside The Black Female Body, 114 Nw. U.L. Rev. Online 187 (2019), Teri A. McMurtry-Chubb 2019 Mercer University

In Search Of The Common Law Inside The Black Female Body, 114 Nw. U.L. Rev. Online 187 (2019), Teri A. Mcmurtry-Chubb

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Rethinking The Efficiency Of The Common Law, D. Daniel Sokol 2019 University of Florida

Rethinking The Efficiency Of The Common Law, D. Daniel Sokol

Notre Dame Law Review

This Article shows how Posner and other scholars who claimed that common law was efficient misunderstood the structure of common law. If common law was more efficient, there would have been a noticeable push across most, if not all, doctrines to greater efficiency. This has not been the case. Rather, common law, better recast as a “platform,” could, under a certain set of parameters, lead to efficient outcomes. Next, the Article’s analysis suggests that while not every judge thinks about efficiency in decisionmaking, there must be some architectural or governance feature pushing in the direction of efficiency—which exists ...


Manufacturing Consent To Climate Inaction: A Case Study Of The Globe And Mail ’S Pipeline Coverage, Jason MacLean 2019 University of Saskatchewan, College of Law

Manufacturing Consent To Climate Inaction: A Case Study Of The Globe And Mail ’S Pipeline Coverage, Jason Maclean

Dalhousie Law Journal

Canada has long been a climate change policy laggard. Canada is among the world’s poorest-performing countries in terms of climate action—not only is Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions-reduction target under the Paris Agreement insufficiently ambitious, Canada is not even remotely on track to meet it. Canada’s enduring inaction on climate change is legitimized and sustained by its mainstream corporate news media, which contribute to the oil and gas industry’s capture of Canadian climate and energy policy. In this article, I examine how Canada’s leading national newspaper, The Globe and Mail, editorially framed the completion of ...


Reorganizations, Sales, And The Changing Face Of Restructuring In Canada: Quantitative Outcomes Of 2012 And 2013 Ccaa Proceedings, Alfonso Nocilla 2019 University of Western Ontario, Faculty of Law

Reorganizations, Sales, And The Changing Face Of Restructuring In Canada: Quantitative Outcomes Of 2012 And 2013 Ccaa Proceedings, Alfonso Nocilla

Dalhousie Law Journal

This article examines quantitative data on the outcomes of proceedings under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA), Canada’s principal statute for resolving large, complex corporate insolvencies. In particular, this article compares the durations, direct costs, and returns to different classes of creditors generated by traditional reorganizations under the CCAA and by “liquidating CCAAs”—that is, proceedings in which the insolvent debtor sells substantially all of its assets rather than reorganizing itself. The article makes a number of contributions to the existing scholarship. Firstly, quantitative data on CCAA proceedings are rare. The data examined here, collected by the author from ...


Third-Party Liability Of Directors And Officers: Reconciling Corporate Personality And Personal Responsibility In Tort, Michael Marin 2019 University of New Brunswick, Faculty of Law

Third-Party Liability Of Directors And Officers: Reconciling Corporate Personality And Personal Responsibility In Tort, Michael Marin

Dalhousie Law Journal

When is a director or of�� cer personally liable in tort to a party who is not the corporation he or she serves? In Canada, there is no clear answer. The law is marked by division both within and between appellate courts, resulting in judgments that are hard to reconcile and verge on arbitrary. This is likely attributable to the mistaken belief that there is a tension between personal liability and corporate personality, as well as the disputed relationship between common law and statutory obligations. To address these challenges, most Canadian courts have followed a threshold corporate law analysis, which ...


Introduction, Kim Brooks 2019 Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University

Introduction, Kim Brooks

Dalhousie Law Journal

At Schulich, we see business law in a broad frame and understand that business law and policy includes the role of businesses in environmental protection, sustainable investing, inter-nation equity, and access to justice. We understand that businesses operate in broad social, economic, and political contexts, and as a community of scholars we care about the interactions of business law and policy with technology, governance and stakeholder rights, and economic, social and environmental justice. We hope that this collection advances vital scholarly and policy conversations.


A Survey And Critique Of The “Seller In Possession” Statutory Regimes Of Common Law Canada: An Abc Prequel, Clayton Bangsund 2019 University of Saskatchewan, College of Law

A Survey And Critique Of The “Seller In Possession” Statutory Regimes Of Common Law Canada: An Abc Prequel, Clayton Bangsund

Dalhousie Law Journal

The article examines the various provincial and territorial statutory regimes that apply to resolve title disputes emanating from a “seller in possession” scenario in which an initial buyer leaves bought goods in the possession of a seller who then transfers them to a subsequent bona de purchaser. Presently there are four distinct statutory models in force across common law Canada. Some provinces and territories incorporate modernized electronic personal property registry infrastructure into their statutory priority regimes, while others do not. The author undertakes a comparative assessment of the four models, highlights their strengths and weaknesses, and asserts that Model 2 ...


Disrupting Business As Usual: Considering Teaching Methods In Business Law Classrooms, Jeffery Hewitt, Shanthi E. Senthe 2019 University of Windsor, Faculty of Law

Disrupting Business As Usual: Considering Teaching Methods In Business Law Classrooms, Jeffery Hewitt, Shanthi E. Senthe

Dalhousie Law Journal

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC)’s Calls to Action propose signimcant changes to legal education. No law school classroom is exempt, including business law courses. We are two of a growing number ofscholars in the legal academy actively incorporating Indigenous laws, critical race theory and socio-economic perspectives into business law courses as part of our responses to the TRC. This paper explores a field school we developed at Windsor Law as a response to the Calls to Action. In a temporary fusion of two courses, Secured Transactions along with Indigenous Peoples, Art & Human Rights, a synergy emerges ...


Evaluating Canadian Tax Remission Orders: A Debt Relief Vehicle For Taxpayers, Samuel Singer 2019 Thompson Rivers University, Faculty of Law

Evaluating Canadian Tax Remission Orders: A Debt Relief Vehicle For Taxpayers, Samuel Singer

Dalhousie Law Journal

Tax remission orders, although rare, serve important functions in the Canadian tax system. This paper draws from a comprehensive study of federal tax remission orders issued between 1998 and 2017. It presents general findings about remission orders in that time period, including remission order applications, their reported costs, and the number of remission orders issued. The paper identifies the five most common categories of reasons cited for granting remission orders. It then applies tax policy analysis to assess the two most frequent reasons for grating remission orders: to provide debt relief for financial hardship and/or extenuating circumstances, and to ...


Corporate Risk And Climate Impacts To Critical Energy Infrastructure In Canada, Rudiger Tscherning 2019 University of Calgary, Faculty of Law

Corporate Risk And Climate Impacts To Critical Energy Infrastructure In Canada, Rudiger Tscherning

Dalhousie Law Journal

Recent climate events such as Hurrican Harvey in Texas foreshadow the dangers that could result from critical energy infrastructure failure in Canada due to physical impacts caused by climate change. This article examines the types of climate impacts that could affect critical energy infrastructure in Canada. The article argues that these impacts translate into three types of corporate risk to the owners and operators of the critical asset: economic risks to the infrastructure asset; management and operational risks to the corporation; and risks arising from corporate disclosure obligations. Applying the theoretical approach of "risk management," the article concludes that, on ...


Untying The Knot: An Analysis Of The English Divorce And Matrimonial Causes Court Records, 1858-1866, Danaya C. Wright 2019 University of Florida Levin College of Law

Untying The Knot: An Analysis Of The English Divorce And Matrimonial Causes Court Records, 1858-1866, Danaya C. Wright

Danaya C. Wright

Historians of Anglo-American family law consider 1857 as a turning point in the development of modern family law and the first big step in the breakdown of coverture and the recognition of women's legal rights. In 1857, The United Kingdom Parliament ("Parliament") created a new civil court to handle all divorce and matrimonial causes, removing the jurisdiction of: the ecclesiastical courts over marital validity; the Chancery over custody of children and separate estates; the royal courts over marital property; and Parliament over full divorce. The new Divorce and Matrimonial Causes Court, a wing of the admiralty and probate courts ...


Marshall As A Judge, Robert Post 2019 Yale Law School

Marshall As A Judge, Robert Post

Fordham Law Review

Marshall is a towering and inspirational figure in the history of American constitutional law. He changed American life forever and unquestionably for the better. But the contemporary significance of Marshall’s legacy is also, in ways that challenge present practices and beliefs, ambiguous.


Protecting Consumers As Sellers, Jim Hawkins 2019 University of Houston - Main

Protecting Consumers As Sellers, Jim Hawkins

Indiana Law Journal

When the majority of modern contract and consumer protection laws were written in the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s, consumers almost always acted as buyers, and businesses almost always acted as sellers. As a result, these laws reflect a model of strong sellers and weak buyers. But paradigms are shifting. Advances in technology and constraints on consumers’ financial lives have pushed consumers into new roles. Consumers today often act as sellers—hawking gold to make ends meet, peddling durable goods on eBay, or offering services in the sharing economy to make a profit. Consumers and business models have changed, but the ...


Arbitration And The Federal Balance, Alyssa King 2019 Queen's University, Faculty of Law

Arbitration And The Federal Balance, Alyssa King

Indiana Law Journal

Mandatory arbitration of statutory rights in contracts between parties of unequal bargaining power has drawn political attention at both the federal and state level. The importance of such reforms has only been heightened by the Supreme Court’s expansion of preemption under the FAA and of arbitral authority. This case law creates incentives for courts at all levels to prefer expansive readings of an arbitration clause. As attempts at federal regulation have stalled, state legislatures and regulatory agencies can expect to be subject to renewed focus. If state legislatures cannot easily limit arbitrability, an alternative is to try reforms that ...


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