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Lineamientos De Política Educativa Intercultural: Aportes Críticos Desde La Diversidad Estudiantil Indígena En La Educación Superior Convencional En Colombia, Ana María Núñez Henao 2024 Universidad de La Salle, Bogotá

Lineamientos De Política Educativa Intercultural: Aportes Críticos Desde La Diversidad Estudiantil Indígena En La Educación Superior Convencional En Colombia, Ana María Núñez Henao

Doctorado en Educación y Sociedad

El preámbulo de la Carta Constitucional colombiana de 1991 reconoce que un componente esencial del territorio nacional es la diversidad y, en este orden de ideas, conceptos como la pluralidad étnica, religiosa, de costumbres, tradiciones y formas de vida de la población deben ser transversales en los diversos procesos de desarrollo de la sociedad. No obstante, a pesar de este reconocimiento en el caso de las Instituciones de Educación Superior (IES) se viene presentando una falencia ya que se ha perpetuado la exclusión de las comunidades indígenas al no incorporar en sus planes de estudio la perspectiva intercultural, aduciendo la …


After Affirmative Action: Contextual Admissions And The Future Of African American Law School Enrollment, Nathan L. Bennett Fleming 2024 University of Oklahoma College of Law

After Affirmative Action: Contextual Admissions And The Future Of African American Law School Enrollment, Nathan L. Bennett Fleming

Oklahoma Law Review

No abstract provided.


Defeat Fascism, Transform Democracy: Mapping Academic Resources, Reframing The Fundamentals, And Organizing For Collective Actions, Francisco Valdes 2024 Seattle University School of Law

Defeat Fascism, Transform Democracy: Mapping Academic Resources, Reframing The Fundamentals, And Organizing For Collective Actions, Francisco Valdes

Seattle University Law Review

The information we gathered during 2021–2023 shows that critical faculty and other academic resources are present throughout most of U.S. legal academia. Counting only full-time faculty, our limited research identified 778 contacts in 200 schools equating to nearly four contacts on average per school. But no organized critical “core” had coalesced within legal academia or, more broadly, throughout higher education expressly dedicated to defending and advancing critical knowledge and its production up to now. And yet, as the 2021–2022 formation of the Critical (Legal) Collective (“CLC”) outlined below demonstrates, many academics sense or acknowledge the need for greater cohesion among …


After Affirmative Action, Meera E. Deo 2024 Seattle University School of Law

After Affirmative Action, Meera E. Deo

Seattle University Law Review

This is a time of crisis in legal education. In truth, we are in the midst of several crises. We are emerging from the COVID pandemic, a period of unprecedented upheaval where law students and law faculty alike struggled through physical challenges, mental health burdens, and decreased academic and professional success. The past few years also have seen a precipitous drop in applications to and enrollment in legal education. Simultaneously, students have been burdened with the skyrocketing costs of attending law school, taking on unmanageable levels of debt. And with the Supreme Court decision in SFFA v. Harvard, we are …


Students For Fair Admissions: Affirming Affirmative Action And Shapeshifting Towards Cognitive Diversity?, Steven A. Ramirez 2024 Seattle University School of Law

Students For Fair Admissions: Affirming Affirmative Action And Shapeshifting Towards Cognitive Diversity?, Steven A. Ramirez

Seattle University Law Review

The Roberts Court holds a well-earned reputation for overturning Supreme Court precedent regardless of the long-standing nature of the case. The Roberts Court knows how to overrule precedent. In Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard (SFFA), the Court’s majority opinion never intimates that it overrules Grutter v. Bollinger, the Court’s leading opinion permitting race-based affirmative action in college admissions. Instead, the Roberts Court applied Grutter as authoritative to hold certain affirmative action programs entailing racial preferences violative of the Constitution. These programs did not provide an end point, nor did they require assessment, review, periodic expiration, or revision for greater …


Sffa V. Harvard College: Closing The Doors Of Equality In Education, Ediberto Roman 2024 Seattle University School of Law

Sffa V. Harvard College: Closing The Doors Of Equality In Education, Ediberto Roman

Seattle University Law Review

The United States Supreme Court’s recent combined decision ending affirmative action in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard College and Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina was hailed in conservative circles as the beginning of “the long road” towards racial equality. Others declared that “the opinion may begin the restoration of our nation’s constitutional colorblind legal covenant.” Another writer pronounced, “Affirmative action perpetuated racial discrimination. Its end is a huge step forward.” A Washington-based opinion page even declared: “[T]he demise of race-based affirmative action should inspire renewed commitment to the ideal of equal opportunity in America.” Despite …


Religious Freedom And Diversity Missions: Insights From Jesuit Law Deans, Anthony E. Varona, Michèle Alexandre, Michael J. Kaufman, Madeleine M. Landrieu 2024 Seattle University School of Law

Religious Freedom And Diversity Missions: Insights From Jesuit Law Deans, Anthony E. Varona, Michèle Alexandre, Michael J. Kaufman, Madeleine M. Landrieu

Seattle University Law Review

This Article is a transcript of a panel moderated by Anthony E. Varona, Dean of Seattle University School of Law. During the panel, Jesuit and religious law school deans discussed what law schools with religious missions have to add to the conversation around SFFA and the continuing role of affirmative action in higher education.


Feeding The Good Fire: Paths To Facilitate Native-Led Fire Management On Federal Lands, Kevin Burdet 2024 Seattle University School of Law

Feeding The Good Fire: Paths To Facilitate Native-Led Fire Management On Federal Lands, Kevin Burdet

Seattle University Law Review

In 2003, nearly twenty Native American reservations were devastated by wildfires that originated on adjacent federal lands. The San Pasqual Reservation’s entire 1,400 acres were burned along with over a third of its homes, and seventy-five percent of the Rincon Reservation was burned, taking twenty homes with it. These devastating fires, along with others in 2002, brought about the Tribal Forest Protection Act of 2004 (TFPA), which offered hope for Tribes to propose projects on bordering or adjacent federal lands and protect reservation lands in the process. Unfortunately, twenty years later, the TFPA has had a marginal effect in enabling …


Dei Newsletter 2024 Issue 1, University of Maine School of Law 2024 University of Maine School of Law

Dei Newsletter 2024 Issue 1, University Of Maine School Of Law

DEI Newsletter

  • Maine Law’s RHRC Mexico project
  • The Third Annual Indian Law and History Lecture
  • Black History Month at Maine Law
  • Black History Month around town
  • The D1L summer employment program
  • Living Room Library recommendations


Capitalism Stakeholderism, Christina Parajon Skinner 2024 Seattle University School of Law

Capitalism Stakeholderism, Christina Parajon Skinner

Seattle University Law Review

Today’s corporate governance debates are replete with discussion of how best to operationalize so-called stakeholder capitalism—that is, a version of capitalism that considers the interests of employees, communities, suppliers, and the environment alongside (if not before) a company’s shareholders. So much focus has been dedicated to the question of capitalism’s reform that few have questioned a key underlying premise of stakeholder capitalism: that is, that competitive capitalism does not serve these various constituencies and groups. This Essay presents a different view and argues that capitalism is, in fact, the ultimate form of stakeholderism. As such, the Essay urges that the …


Medical Taking Of Human Biological Material V. Traditional “Art Looting”: Henrietta Lacks And The Complex Ethical And Legal Liability Questions Raised By Her Unfortunate Case, Alyaa Chace 2024 Touro University Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Medical Taking Of Human Biological Material V. Traditional “Art Looting”: Henrietta Lacks And The Complex Ethical And Legal Liability Questions Raised By Her Unfortunate Case, Alyaa Chace

Touro Law Review

During a poignant saga of American history, Henrietta Lacks stands as an emblem of both scientific triumph and ethical controversy. In 1951, Mrs. Lacks, a tobacco farmer and mother of five, visited Johns Hopkins Hospital for treatment of what was later discovered to be advanced stage cervical cancer. Her doctors treated her with radium, which was standard practice at the time. However, Mrs. Lacks’s cancer rapidly metastasized and she ultimately passed away just months later on October 4, 1951, at the age of 31. During the course of her treatment, Mrs. Lacks’s cells were non-consensually removed for purposes of scientific …


Mental Hygiene Law Article 81 Proceedings In New York State And The Associated Deprivation Of One’S Civil Rights And Autonomy: Are We Really Helping?, Giulia R. Marino 2024 Touro University Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center

Mental Hygiene Law Article 81 Proceedings In New York State And The Associated Deprivation Of One’S Civil Rights And Autonomy: Are We Really Helping?, Giulia R. Marino

Touro Law Review

New York State Mental Hygiene Law Article 81 affords a population that is vulnerable to abuse and exploitation an opportunity to have their personal and/or property management needs met by the least restrictive means available, often entailing a severe deprivation of their rights.1 But what is meant by the term “least restrictive means available,” how is this determined, and how are these “means” implemented and monitored? Is this deprivation of an individual’s rights the only way they can be helped, or is this unnecessarily harmful? Are there other ways to protect the vulnerable in our society without taking away these …


Do Public Accommodations Laws Compel “What Shall Be Orthodox”?: The Role Of Barnette In 303 Creative Llc V. Eleni, Linda C. McClain 2024 Boston University School of Law

Do Public Accommodations Laws Compel “What Shall Be Orthodox”?: The Role Of Barnette In 303 Creative Llc V. Eleni, Linda C. Mcclain

Faculty Scholarship

This article addresses the U.S. Supreme Court’s embrace, in 303 Creative LLC v. Elenis, of a First Amendment objection to state public accommodations laws that the Court avoided in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission: such laws compel governmental orthodoxy. These objections invoke West Virginia Board of Education v. Barnette’s celebrated language: “If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein.” They also …


The New Gender Panic In Sport: Why State Laws Banning Transgender Athletes Are Unconstitutional, Deborah Brake 2024 University of Pittsburgh School of Law

The New Gender Panic In Sport: Why State Laws Banning Transgender Athletes Are Unconstitutional, Deborah Brake

Articles

The scope and pace of legislative activity targeting transgender individuals is nothing short of a gender panic. From restrictions on medical care to the regulation of library books and the use of pronouns in schools, attacks on the transgender community have reached crisis proportions. A growing number of families with transgender children are being forced to leave their states of residence to keep their children healthy and their families safe and intact. The breadth and pace of these developments is striking. Although the anti-transgender backlash now extends broadly into health and family governance, sport was one of the first settings—the …


Abortion Disorientation, Greer Donley, Caroline M. Kelly 2024 University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Abortion Disorientation, Greer Donley, Caroline M. Kelly

Articles

The word “abortion” pervades public discourse in the wake of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. But do we know what it means? Not only do law and medicine define it differently; state legislatures have codified wildly different definitions of abortion across jurisdictions. Our analysis exposes inherent ambiguities at the boundaries of the term, particularly as abortion intersects with other categories that we often think of as distinct: pregnancy loss, ectopic pregnancy, and other forms of medically necessary care. By juxtaposing statutory text next to real people’s experiences of being denied care in states with abortion bans, we reveal …


Looted Cultural Objects, Elena Baylis 2024 University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Looted Cultural Objects, Elena Baylis

Articles

In the United States, Europe, and elsewhere, museums are in possession of cultural objects that were unethically taken from their countries and communities of origin under the auspices of colonialism. For many years, the art world considered such holdings unexceptional. Now, a longstanding movement to decolonize museums is gaining momentum, and some museums are reconsidering their collections. Presently, whether to return such looted foreign cultural objects is typically a voluntary choice for individual museums to make, not a legal obligation. Modern treaties and statutes protecting cultural property apply only prospectively, to items stolen or illegally exported after their effective dates. …


Are Embryos Or Fetuses Brain Dead? Implications For The Abortion Debate, Greer Donley 2024 University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Are Embryos Or Fetuses Brain Dead? Implications For The Abortion Debate, Greer Donley

Articles

Most state abortion definitions exclude the removal of a dead fetus, attempting to distinguish miscarriage and abortion care. But what does “dead” mean at the earliest stages of potential life? There is a consensus at the end of life that death not only encompasses the cessation of cardiac activity, but also brain death. This symposium essay considers whether life can exist before brain life begins and how that might impact the abortion debate. The most rudimentary brain waves cannot be detected in an embryo before roughly the eighth week of pregnancy; the capacity for feeling and consciousness begin much later. …


Rethinking Antebellum Bankruptcy, Rafael I. Pardo 2024 Washington University in St. Louis School of Law

Rethinking Antebellum Bankruptcy, Rafael I. Pardo

Scholarship@WashULaw

Bankruptcy law has been repeatedly reinvented over time in response to changing circumstances. The Bankruptcy Act of 1841—passed by Congress to address the financial ruin caused by the Panic of 1837—constituted a revolutionary break from its immediate predecessor, the Bankruptcy Act of 1800, which was the nation’s first bankruptcy statute. Although Congress repealed the 1841 Act in 1843, the legislation lasted significantly longer than recognized by scholars. The repeal legislation permitted pending bankruptcy cases to be finally resolved pursuant to the Act’s terms. Because debtors flooded the judicially understaffed 1841 Act system with over 46,000 cases, the Act’s administration continued …


Redistributing Justice, Benjamin Levin, Kate Levine 2024 Washington University in St. Louis School of Law

Redistributing Justice, Benjamin Levin, Kate Levine

Scholarship@WashULaw

This article surfaces an obstacle to decarceration hiding in plain sight: progressives’ continued support for the carceral system. Despite increasingly prevalent critiques of criminal law from progressives, there hardly is a consensus on the left in opposition to the carceral state. Many left-leaning academics and activists who may critique the criminal system writ large remain enthusiastic about criminal law in certain areas—often areas where defendants are imagined as powerful and victims as particularly vulnerable. In this article, we offer a novel theory for what animates the seemingly conflicted attitude among progressives toward criminal punishment—the hope that the criminal system can …


Voting Under The Federal Constitution, Travis Crum 2024 Washington University in St. Louis School of Law

Voting Under The Federal Constitution, Travis Crum

Scholarship@WashULaw

There is no explicit, affirmative right to vote in the federal Constitution. At the Founding, States had total discretion to choose their electorate. Although that electorate was the most democratic in history, the franchise was largely limited to property-owning White men. Over the course of two centuries, the United States democratized, albeit in fits and starts. The right to vote was often expanded in response to wartime service and mobilization.

A series of constitutional amendments prohibited discrimination in voting on account of race (Fifteenth), sex (Nineteenth), inability to pay a poll tax (Twenty-Fourth), and age (Twenty-Sixth). These amendments were worded …


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