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What Can Brown Do For You?: Addressing Mccleskey V. Kemp As A Flawed Standard For Measuring The Constitutionally Significant Risk Of Race Bias, Mario L. Barnes, Erwin Chemerinsky 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

What Can Brown Do For You?: Addressing Mccleskey V. Kemp As A Flawed Standard For Measuring The Constitutionally Significant Risk Of Race Bias, Mario L. Barnes, Erwin Chemerinsky

Northwestern University Law Review

This Essay asserts that in McCleskey v. Kemp, the Supreme Court created a problematic standard for the evidence of race bias necessary to uphold an equal protection claim under the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. First, the Court’s opinion reinforced the cramped understanding that constitutional claims require evidence of not only disparate impact but also discriminatory purpose, producing significant negative consequences for the operation of the U.S. criminal justice system. Second, the Court rejected the Baldus study’s findings of statistically significant correlations between the races of the perpetrators and victims and the imposition of the ...


Tipped Scales: A Look At The Ever-Growing Imbalance Of Power Protecting Religiously Motivated Conduct, Why That's Bad, And How To Stop It, Jeff Nelson 2018 Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

Tipped Scales: A Look At The Ever-Growing Imbalance Of Power Protecting Religiously Motivated Conduct, Why That's Bad, And How To Stop It, Jeff Nelson

Cleveland State Law Review

This Note examines the current state of the law that seemingly allows individuals to harm and discriminate against others on the basis of their protected religious beliefs. This Note also explores how such a result has been made possible and how it may be stymied by judicial and legislative action. Section II discusses a short history of the First Amendment’s Free Exercise Clause leading up to Religious Freedom Restoration Acts, and also includes an examination of both the real and possible harmful effects of RFRAs, current reactions to the application of these laws domestically, and interesting parallels internationally. Section ...


Constitutional Anomalies Or As-Applied Challenges? A Defense Of Religious Exemptions, Stephanie H. Barclay, Mark L. Rienzi 2018 Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

Constitutional Anomalies Or As-Applied Challenges? A Defense Of Religious Exemptions, Stephanie H. Barclay, Mark L. Rienzi

Boston College Law Review

In the wake of Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and now in anticipation of Craig v. Masterpiece Cakeshop, Inc., the notion that religious exemptions are dangerously out of step with norms of Constitutional jurisprudence has taken on a renewed popularity. Critics increasingly claim that religious exemptions, such as those available prior to Employment Division v. Smith and now available under the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), are a threat to basic fairness, equality, and the rule of law. Under this view, exemptions create an anomalous private right to ignore laws that everyone else must obey, and such a scheme will ...


Understanding "Sanctuary Cities", Christopher N. Lasch, R. Linus Chan, Ingrid V. Eagly, Dina Francesca Haynes, Annie Lai, Elizabeth M. McCormick, Juliet P. Stumpf 2018 University of Denver Sturm College of Law

Understanding "Sanctuary Cities", Christopher N. Lasch, R. Linus Chan, Ingrid V. Eagly, Dina Francesca Haynes, Annie Lai, Elizabeth M. Mccormick, Juliet P. Stumpf

Boston College Law Review

In the wake of President Trump’s election, a growing number of local jurisdictions around the country have sought to disentangle their criminal justice apparatus from federal immigration enforcement efforts. These localities have embraced a series of reforms that attempt to ensure immigrants are not deported when they come into contact with the criminal justice system. The Trump administration has labeled these jurisdictions “sanctuary cities” and vowed to “end” them by, among other things, attempting to cut off their federal funding.

This Article is a collaborative project authored by law professors specializing in the intersection between immigration and criminal law ...


A Kentucky Town Votes Against A Culture War Rematch, Campbell Robertson 2018 The New York Times

A Kentucky Town Votes Against A Culture War Rematch, Campbell Robertson

Media Collection

No abstract provided.


Gay Man Denied Marriage License By Kim Davis Loses Bid To Challenge Her For Kentucky County Clerkship, Mahita Gajanan 2018 Time

Gay Man Denied Marriage License By Kim Davis Loses Bid To Challenge Her For Kentucky County Clerkship, Mahita Gajanan

Media Collection

No abstract provided.


Man Denied Marriage License By Kim Davis Loses Primary Bid, Will Not Face Her In Fall, Will Wright 2018 Lexington Herald-Leader

Man Denied Marriage License By Kim Davis Loses Primary Bid, Will Not Face Her In Fall, Will Wright

Media Collection

No abstract provided.


Caudill To Face Davis This November, The Morehead News 2018 Morehead State University

Caudill To Face Davis This November, The Morehead News

Media Collection

No abstract provided.


Amy Schumer, Susan Sarandon Give Cqsh To Kim Davis' Would-Be Opponent, Andrew Wlfoson 2018 Louisville Courier-Journal

Amy Schumer, Susan Sarandon Give Cqsh To Kim Davis' Would-Be Opponent, Andrew Wlfoson

Media Collection

No abstract provided.


Brief Of Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality As Amicus Curiae In Support Of Plaintiff-Appellee And For Affirmance, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality 2018 Seattle University School of Law

Brief Of Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality As Amicus Curiae In Support Of Plaintiff-Appellee And For Affirmance, Fred T. Korematsu Center For Law And Equality

Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

Fair Housing Center of Washington v. Breier-Scheetz


Radical Social Ecology As Deep Pragmatism: A Call To The Abolition Of Systemic Dissonance And The Minimization Of Entropic Chaos, Arielle Brender 2018 Fordham University

Radical Social Ecology As Deep Pragmatism: A Call To The Abolition Of Systemic Dissonance And The Minimization Of Entropic Chaos, Arielle Brender

Student Theses 2015-Present

This paper aims to shed light on the dissonance caused by the superimposition of Dominant Human Systems on Natural Systems. I highlight the synthetic nature of Dominant Human Systems as egoic and linguistic phenomenon manufactured by a mere portion of the human population, which renders them inherently oppressive unto peoples and landscapes whose wisdom were barred from the design process. In pursuing a radical pragmatic approach to mending the simultaneous oppression and destruction of the human being and the earth, I highlight the necessity of minimizing entropic chaos caused by excess energy expenditure, an essential feature of systems that aim ...


Kim Davis Denied His Marriage License. Will Voters Let Him Try To Oust Her?, Will Wright 2018 Lexington Herald-Leader

Kim Davis Denied His Marriage License. Will Voters Let Him Try To Oust Her?, Will Wright

Media Collection

No abstract provided.


Leveraging Social Science Expertise In Immigration Policymaking, Ming H. Chen 2018 University of Colorado Law and Political Science

Leveraging Social Science Expertise In Immigration Policymaking, Ming H. Chen

NULR Online

The longstanding uncertainty about how policymakers should grapple with social science demonstrating racism persists in the modern administrative state. This Essay examines the uses and misuses of social science and expertise in immigration policymaking. More specifically, it highlights three immigration policies that dismiss social scientific findings and expertise as part of presidential and agency decision-making: border control, crime control, and extreme vetting of refugees to prevent terrorism. The Essay claims that these rejections of expertise undermine both substantive and procedural protections for immigrants and undermine important functions of the administrative state as a curb on irrationality in policymaking. It concludes ...


Embracing The Chinese Exclusion Case: An International Law Approach To Racial Exclusions, Lauri Kai 2018 College of William & Mary Law School

Embracing The Chinese Exclusion Case: An International Law Approach To Racial Exclusions, Lauri Kai

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Death In America Under Color Of Law: Our Long, Inglorious Experience With Capital Punishment, Rob Warden, Daniel Lennard 2018 Center on Wrongful Convictions, Bluhm Legal Clinic, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

Death In America Under Color Of Law: Our Long, Inglorious Experience With Capital Punishment, Rob Warden, Daniel Lennard

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


The Concept Of “Unusual Punishments” In Anglo-American Law: The Death Penalty As Arbitrary, Discriminatory, And Cruel And Unusual, John D. Bessler 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

The Concept Of “Unusual Punishments” In Anglo-American Law: The Death Penalty As Arbitrary, Discriminatory, And Cruel And Unusual, John D. Bessler

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

The Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, like the English Bill of Rights before it, safeguards against the infliction of “cruel and unusual punishments.” To better understand the meaning of that provision, this Article explores the concept of “unusual punishments” and its opposite, “usual punishments.” In particular, this Article traces the use of the “usual” and “unusual” punishments terminology in Anglo-American sources to shed new light on the Eighth Amendment’s Cruel and Unusual Punishments Clause. The Article surveys historical references to “usual” and “unusual” punishments in early English and American texts, then analyzes the development of American constitutional ...


Litigating Trauma As Disability In American Schools, Taylor N. Mullaney 2018 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Litigating Trauma As Disability In American Schools, Taylor N. Mullaney

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


No More Tiers? Proportionality As An Alternative To Multiple Levels Of Scrutiny In Individual Rights Cases, Donald L. Beschle 2018 John Marshall School of Law

No More Tiers? Proportionality As An Alternative To Multiple Levels Of Scrutiny In Individual Rights Cases, Donald L. Beschle

Pace Law Review

This article will explore how the explicit adoption of proportionality analysis as a single analytical tool might lead, not only to a more coherent approach to individual rights cases, but will also bring together aspects of the current multiple analytical tiers in a way that allows full consideration of both the individual rights and the social values present in these cases. Part I of this article will give a brief overview of the history of the creation and application of the various tiers of analysis used by the United States Supreme Court and explore how the once-sharp difference in those ...


The Devil You Don’T Know: Implicit Bias Keeps Women In Their Place, Michele N. Struffolino 2018 Nova Southeastern University

The Devil You Don’T Know: Implicit Bias Keeps Women In Their Place, Michele N. Struffolino

Pace Law Review

While men’s claims of gender bias in the family law system are acknowledged, this article focuses on how bias, whether implicit or explicit under the guise of unconscious attitudes or behavior, continues to place women at a systemic disadvantage. Although implicit bias also impacts outcomes in child abuse and neglect actions involving the state, the focus of this article is the impact of implicit bias in actions between women and men in the family courts, in particular those issues involved in the dissolution of the relationship and the family unit. First, the emergence of implicit social cognition theory will ...


Assessing Students' Civil Rights Claims Against School Resource Officers, Kerrin C. Wolf 2018 Stockton University

Assessing Students' Civil Rights Claims Against School Resource Officers, Kerrin C. Wolf

Pace Law Review

Police officers stationed in public schools, commonly referred to as school resource officers (SROs), have become commonplace in the United States over the past twenty-five years. Their primary responsibility is to maintain order and safety in schools, but they also serve as counselors and mentors for students, and teach classes related to drug and alcohol abuse, gang avoidance, and other topics. SROs’ presence in schools raises important legal questions because they interact with students on a daily basis and are directly involved in schools’ efforts to control student behavior through school discipline and security. Additionally, a series of Supreme Court ...


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