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Global Intersections: Critical Race Feminist Human Rights And Inter/National Black Women, Hope Lewis 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Global Intersections: Critical Race Feminist Human Rights And Inter/National Black Women, Hope Lewis

Maine Law Review

In this brief essay, I illustrate how Critical Race Feminist analysis could reconceptualize the human rights problems facing “Inter/national Black women” --in this case, Black women who migrate between the United States and Jamaica. This focus on Jamaican American migrants is very personal as well as political; I was raised by Jamaican American women. However, I have begun to focus on such women in my research not only in a search for “home” but also because there are important lessons to be learned from those who are the least visible in the legal literature. I draw the framework for ...


Shattered Jade, Broken Shoe: Foreign Economic Development And The Sexual Exploitation Of Women In China, Elizabeth Spahn 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Shattered Jade, Broken Shoe: Foreign Economic Development And The Sexual Exploitation Of Women In China, Elizabeth Spahn

Maine Law Review

Predicting the ways in which feminisms might develop in the next century is unfortunately well beyond my own capabilities. In the next decade or two, however, one thing I believe we might want to think about are the relationships between feminisms and global free market capitalisms. The question I am asking, simply stated, is the extent to which economic development (free-market global capitalism) advances, is neutral toward, or harms women. One traditional American way of viewing the global free market is to tout economic development as a panacea for the problems facing the world's poorest and most violated group ...


The Pregnancy Discrimination Act: Legitimating Discrimination Against Pregnant Women In The Workforce, Judith G. Greenberg 2018 University of Maine School of Law

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act: Legitimating Discrimination Against Pregnant Women In The Workforce, Judith G. Greenberg

Maine Law Review

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) has been effective in making the most egregious and obvious forms of pregnancy discrimination illegal. Unfortunately, the PDA has also acted as a shield behind which employers can hide as they discriminate against their pregnant employees. The result is that the PDA permits discrimination based on the very sort of stereotyping that it was expected to eradicate. There are two dominant stereotypes of pregnant women. Both are inconsistent with the image of a good worker. One stereotype connects pregnant women with the home. In one form or another it says, “Pregnant women are/should be ...


Gutting The Fourth Amendment: Judicial Complicity In Racial Profiling And The Real-Life Implications, Mary N. Beall 2018 University of Minnesota Law School

Gutting The Fourth Amendment: Judicial Complicity In Racial Profiling And The Real-Life Implications, Mary N. Beall

Law & Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice

No abstract provided.


Is It Just Dessert? Female Recruits Don't Get Their Fair Share Of The Pie: The Marine Corps Fights Gender Integration Of Basic Training, Violating Equal Protection Standards And Cultivating A Culture Where Female Recruits Are Left Out Of The "Brotherhood", Maria Brekke 2018 University of Minnesota Law School

Is It Just Dessert? Female Recruits Don't Get Their Fair Share Of The Pie: The Marine Corps Fights Gender Integration Of Basic Training, Violating Equal Protection Standards And Cultivating A Culture Where Female Recruits Are Left Out Of The "Brotherhood", Maria Brekke

Law & Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice

No abstract provided.


Why The Religious Right Can't Have Its (Straight Wedding) Cake And Eat It Too: Breaking The Preservation-Through-Transformation Dynamic In Masterpiece Cakeshop V. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, Kyle C. Velte 2018 University of Minnesota Law School

Why The Religious Right Can't Have Its (Straight Wedding) Cake And Eat It Too: Breaking The Preservation-Through-Transformation Dynamic In Masterpiece Cakeshop V. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, Kyle C. Velte

Law & Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice

No abstract provided.


The Right To Counsel In Mississippi: Evaluation Of Adult Felony Trial Level Indigent Defense Services, Sixth Amendment Center, The Defender Initiative 2018 Seattle University School of Law

The Right To Counsel In Mississippi: Evaluation Of Adult Felony Trial Level Indigent Defense Services, Sixth Amendment Center, The Defender Initiative

Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

The Right to Counsel in Mississippi: Evaluation of Adult Felony Trial Level Indigent Defense Services


Rwu First Amendment Blog: Dean Yelnosky's Blog: Ruling Could Destroy Labor Unions As We Know Them 2-26-2018, Michael J. Yelnosky 2018 Roger Williams University School of Law

Rwu First Amendment Blog: Dean Yelnosky's Blog: Ruling Could Destroy Labor Unions As We Know Them 2-26-2018, Michael J. Yelnosky

Law School Blogs

No abstract provided.


I Am Cait, But It's None Of Your Business: The Problem Of Invasive Transgender Policies And A Fourth Amendment Solution, Elise Holtzman 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

I Am Cait, But It's None Of Your Business: The Problem Of Invasive Transgender Policies And A Fourth Amendment Solution, Elise Holtzman

Florida Law Review

Transgender people constitute a distinct minority with unique legal battles. There is a widespread societal misunderstanding of what it means to be transgender that results in treating the transgender community the same as their lesbian, gay, and members of bisexual counterparts. This misunderstanding is even more prevalent in the legal context, resulting in a serious failure of courts to protect transgender individuals’ constitutional rights. This Note explores why the current legal treatment of transgender rights is inadequate. This Note then argues that the Fourth Amendment right to privacy should be construed outside of the criminal context and should be utilized ...


When Girls Play With G.I. Joes And Boys Play With Barbies: The Path To Gender Reassignment In Minors, Nicole Burt 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

When Girls Play With G.I. Joes And Boys Play With Barbies: The Path To Gender Reassignment In Minors, Nicole Burt

Florida Law Review

Currently, the process of gender reassignment in minors requires parental consent and the approval of a mental-health counselor. The actual treatment can begin with puberty blockers-which stall the beginnings of puberty-followed by hormone injections to transform the minor into the requested gender. The hormone injections are thought to have irreversible features, but the effects of these injections are largely untested. The final step, surgical reassignment, is seemingly limited to those over the age of eighteen. The process of reassignment in minors has seen a substantial increase nationwide over the past decade, although the exact number of those seeking reassignment is ...


I Am Cait, But It's None Of Your Business: The Problem Of Invasive Transgender Policies And A Fourth Amendment Solution, Elise Holtzman 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

I Am Cait, But It's None Of Your Business: The Problem Of Invasive Transgender Policies And A Fourth Amendment Solution, Elise Holtzman

Florida Law Review

Transgender people constitute a distinct minority with unique legal battles. There is a widespread societal misunderstanding of what it means to be transgender that results in treating the transgender community the same as their lesbian, gay, and members of bisexual counterparts. This misunderstanding is even more prevalent in the legal context, resulting in a serious failure of courts to protect transgender individuals’ constitutional rights. This Note explores why the current legal treatment of transgender rights is inadequate. This Note then argues that the Fourth Amendment right to privacy should be construed outside of the criminal context and should be utilized ...


When Girls Play With G.I. Joes And Boys Play With Barbies: The Path To Gender Reassignment In Minors, Nicole Burt 2018 University of Florida Levin College of Law

When Girls Play With G.I. Joes And Boys Play With Barbies: The Path To Gender Reassignment In Minors, Nicole Burt

Florida Law Review

Currently, the process of gender reassignment in minors requires parental consent and the approval of a mental-health counselor. The actual treatment can begin with puberty blockers-which stall the beginnings of puberty-followed by hormone injections to transform the minor into the requested gender. The hormone injections are thought to have irreversible features, but the effects of these injections are largely untested. The final step, surgical reassignment, is seemingly limited to those over the age of eighteen. The process of reassignment in minors has seen a substantial increase nationwide over the past decade, although the exact number of those seeking reassignment is ...


Never On Sunday: Workplace Religious Freedom In The New Millennium, Marianne C. Delpo 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Never On Sunday: Workplace Religious Freedom In The New Millennium, Marianne C. Delpo

Maine Law Review

Imagine being fired for refusing to sing Happy Birthday. Now imagine collecting $53,000 for that firing--from a waitressing job. Science fiction? Not exactly. Try religious discrimination in the workplace--1990s style. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 has long proscribed such treatment, but lawsuits claiming this type of workplace discrimination were relatively rare for many years. Now claims are on the rise, up 18% over the past five years, and the substance of religious discrimination claims is changing to include some unprecedented fact patterns. This new activity in employment discrimination law, as well as the growing likelihood ...


Litigating Genocide: A Consideration Of The Criminal Court In Light Of The German Jew's Legal Response To Nazi Persecution, 1933-1941, Jody M. Prescott 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Litigating Genocide: A Consideration Of The Criminal Court In Light Of The German Jew's Legal Response To Nazi Persecution, 1933-1941, Jody M. Prescott

Maine Law Review

After years of negotiation, a majority of the nations of the world have agreed to create an International Criminal Court. It will be given jurisdiction over three core types of offenses: genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. With regard to war crimes, however, nations that join the court may take advantage of an “opt-out” procedure, whereby the court's jurisdiction over these offenses may be rejected for seven years after the court comes into existence. For various reasons, a small number of nations, including the United States, have refused to sign the treaty creating the court. While heralded as ...


Mullin V. Ratheon Co.: The Threatened Vitality Of Disparate Impact Under The Adea, Miles F. Archer 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Mullin V. Ratheon Co.: The Threatened Vitality Of Disparate Impact Under The Adea, Miles F. Archer

Maine Law Review

Seven years after Congress enacted Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), and four years after the enactment of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (the ADEA), the Supreme Court, in Griggs v. Duke Power Co., enunciated the doctrine of disparate impact as a means of establishing liability under Title VII. Since that time, the doctrine has evolved considerably and its application and contours have been redefined by the Court as well as by Congress. Within this evolution there has been a debate among the courts and commentators as to whether the doctrine may ...


Exercising The Right To Public Accommodations: The Debate Over Single-Sex Health Clubs, Miriam A. Cherry 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Exercising The Right To Public Accommodations: The Debate Over Single-Sex Health Clubs, Miriam A. Cherry

Maine Law Review

Recently, the debate over single-sex health clubs gained national attention when a patent attorney, James Foster, sued for admission to Healthworks, a Massachusetts all-women's health club. Jurisdictions across the country have also been struggling with the issue, and no clear consensus has emerged. Besides highlighting a wide variance between state laws, the debate over single-sex health clubs illuminates tensions within current feminist thought and within the current legal doctrine surrounding public accommodations statutes. Specifically, the presence of single-sex health clubs, like the question of single-sex schools, asks whether, in some contexts, it is legally and morally acceptable for men ...


The Supreme Court Reverses The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's Directive That Disability Determinations Should Be Made Without Regard To Mitigating Measures: Sutton V. United Airlines, Sara Gagne Holmes 2018 University of Maine School of Law

The Supreme Court Reverses The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's Directive That Disability Determinations Should Be Made Without Regard To Mitigating Measures: Sutton V. United Airlines, Sara Gagne Holmes

Maine Law Review

In Sutton v. United Airlines, identical twin sisters with severe myopia, filed suit under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) alleging that United Airlines (United) discriminated against them on the basis of a disability, or because United regarded them as having a disability. This case invited the United States Supreme Court to decide for the first time whether mitigating measures such as glasses, medication or prosthetics should be considered when determining if an impairment is an “actual disability” under the ADA, and what constitutes a proper allegation for being “regarded as” disabled under the ADA. In a ...


Mixed Messages: An Analysis Of The Conflicting Standards Used By The United States Circuit Courts Of Appeals When Awarding The Compensatory Education For A Violation Of The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, James C. Schwellenbach 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Mixed Messages: An Analysis Of The Conflicting Standards Used By The United States Circuit Courts Of Appeals When Awarding The Compensatory Education For A Violation Of The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, James C. Schwellenbach

Maine Law Review

With the passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA) of 1975, now titled the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA or the Act), each child with a disability was guaranteed the right to a free and appropriate public education. It fell to the public schools to provide that free and appropriate education to students with disabilities, many of whom had been denied access to public schools prior to that time. It was inevitable that parents would disagree with their local school district, or the state educational agency, as to whether their child was being provided the kind ...


The Maine Civil Rights Act: History, Enforcement, Application, And Analysis, J. Christopher Parr 2018 University of Maine School of Law

The Maine Civil Rights Act: History, Enforcement, Application, And Analysis, J. Christopher Parr

Maine Law Review

Since the passage of the “Maine Civil Rights Act” (MCRA, Act) in 1989, the Maine Department of the Attorney General has made enforcement of that civil “hate crime” law one of its highest priorities. According to one statistic, “more than 125 people have been prosecuted in Maine's civil courts on hate crime charges since 1994,” and only two of those actions have been lost by the State. The Attorney General at the time of this writing, Andrew Ketterer, has stated that he takes the perpetration of hate crimes seriously, and that it has been important to him “that the ...


Hate Speech - The United States Versus The Rest Of The World?, Kevin Boyle 2018 University of Maine School of Law

Hate Speech - The United States Versus The Rest Of The World?, Kevin Boyle

Maine Law Review

The search for a commonly agreed upon international legal understanding of the meaning of free speech or freedom of expression, as an individual human right, was a major international preoccupation from the 1940s to the 1980s. During the Cold War it was, of course, also a highly ideological debate. There were three positions, broadly speaking: the Soviet Union and its allies, who had little enthusiasm for the idea at all; the United States, which believed in it—many thought—too much; and the rest, the other Western democracies and developing countries, who tried to hold the middle ground. These contrasting ...


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