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Bias In Police Shootings: Is It Just An Opinion?, Phuong Ho 2021 Kennesaw State University

Bias In Police Shootings: Is It Just An Opinion?, Phuong Ho

Symposium of Student Scholars

The claims of racism have drawn public attention toward police brutality and its impact on minorities. Is this just an opinion or is there any statistical evidence? Recent studies from The Atlantic have investigated the average age and ethnicity of victims from police killings in 2015-2016. As an Asian-American, I am motivated to examine the issue of police killings among races and other demographics to find any bias that is present. Using the dataset of 2,204 victims of police killings (2015-2016) collected by The Guardian, I will examine the following variables for bias: age, cause of death, armed/unarmed ...


It's Alright, Ma, It's Life And Life Only: Have Universities Been Meeting Their Legal Obligations To High-Risk Faculty During The Pandemic?, Gary J. Simson, Mark L. Jones, Cathren K. Page, Suzianne D. Painter-Thorne 2021 Pepperdine University

It's Alright, Ma, It's Life And Life Only: Have Universities Been Meeting Their Legal Obligations To High-Risk Faculty During The Pandemic?, Gary J. Simson, Mark L. Jones, Cathren K. Page, Suzianne D. Painter-Thorne

Pepperdine Law Review

Even those universities most firmly committed to returning to in-person instruction in fall semester 2020 recognized that for health reasons some exceptions would need to be made. The CDC had identified two groups—people age sixty-five and over and people with certain medical conditions—as persons "at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19," and it had spelled out various special precautions they should take to avoid contracting the virus. Given the CDC's unique stature, universities very reasonably could have been expected to grant exceptions to faculty falling into either group, but that's not what many universities did ...


The Alt-Right Movement And National Security, Matthew Valasik, Shannon E. Reid 2021 US Army War College

The Alt-Right Movement And National Security, Matthew Valasik, Shannon E. Reid

The US Army War College Quarterly: Parameters

Identifying the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol as an inflection point, this article analyzes the historical relationship between White supremacy and the US military from Reconstruction after the Civil War to the present. The article posits causes for the disproportionate number of current and former members of the military associated with White power groups and proposes steps the Department of Defense can take to combat the problems posed by the association of the US military with these groups.


'Divisive Concepts' Law And The Big Chill, John M. Greabe 2021 University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law

'Divisive Concepts' Law And The Big Chill, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

[Excerpt] "Much Critical commentary concerning the so-called "divisive concepts" provisions in this year's budget legislation has focused on their restrictions on speech. These restrictions, among other things, forbid public K-12 teachers from instructing that some persons are "inherently superior or inferior to [others]", "inherently racist or sexist," "should be discriminated against," or "should not attempt to treat others equally" because of their "age, sex gender identity, sexual orientation, race, creed, color, marital status, mental or physical disability, religion, or national origin."


New Hampshire's 'Divisive Concepts' Law And The Big Chill, John M. Greabe 2021 University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law

New Hampshire's 'Divisive Concepts' Law And The Big Chill, John M. Greabe

Law Faculty Scholarship

[Excerpt] "

Much critical commentary on the so-called “divisive concepts” provisions in this year’s budget legislation – the label comes from language in an earlier version of the bill – has focused on their content- and viewpoint-based restraints on speech. These speech restrictions prohibit state public employers, including public K-12 school teachers, from (among other things) instructing that persons are “inherently superior or inferior to [others]” “inherently racist or sexist,” “should be discriminated against,” or “should not attempt to treat others equally” because of their “age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, creed, color, marital status, familial status, mental or physical disability ...


Disabled Perspectives On Legal Education: Reckoning And Reform, Lilith A. Siegel, Karen Tani 2021 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Disabled Perspectives On Legal Education: Reckoning And Reform, Lilith A. Siegel, Karen Tani

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This is an Introduction to a Journal of Legal Education symposium on "Disabled Law Students and the Future of Legal Education." The symposium's focal point is a set of first-person essays by disabled lawyers. Writing thirty years after the inclusive promise of the Americans with Disabilities Act, but also amidst powerful evidence (via the pandemic) of the devaluation of people with disabilities, contributors reflect on their experiences in law school and the legal profession. The symposium pairs these essays with commentary from some of the nation’s leading scholars of disability law. The overarching goals of the symposium are ...


Disestablishing "The Last Plantation": The Need For Accountability In The United States Department Of Agriculture, Seth L. Ellis 2021 Northern Illinois University

Disestablishing "The Last Plantation": The Need For Accountability In The United States Department Of Agriculture, Seth L. Ellis

Journal of Food Law & Policy

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) was signed into law by President Abraham Lincoln in 1862. At the signing ceremony, President Lincoln declared the Department of Agriculture to be the "people's Department" because he said it governed an industry "in which [citizens felt] more directly concerned than in any other. .. ." Today, many American citizens do not share Abraham Lincoln's view of the USDA as being the "people's Department"; rather, they identify it as being "the last plantation" due to its long history of open discrimination against African-American farmers. While this discrimination has occurred throughout America's ...


Investing In Alternatives: Three Logics Of Criminal System Replacement, Monica C. Bell, Katherine Beckett, Forrest Stuart 2021 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Investing In Alternatives: Three Logics Of Criminal System Replacement, Monica C. Bell, Katherine Beckett, Forrest Stuart

UC Irvine Law Review

What logics underlie the call to “defund the police,” and how do those logics matter in policy debate? In the wake of widespread protests after the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and other victims of police violence during the summer of 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement’s call to “defund the police” captured the national imagination. Several municipal governments promised to cut funding and contracts for their respective police departments, with mixed results. Because we expect police defunding and reinvestment to remain a central movement demand, this Article explores the demand’s discursive and normative terrain. It does ...


Suspicion And Discretion In Policing: How Laws And Policies Contribute To Inequity, Amanda Charbonneau, Jack Glaser 2021 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Suspicion And Discretion In Policing: How Laws And Policies Contribute To Inequity, Amanda Charbonneau, Jack Glaser

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


State Regulation Of Policing: Post Commissions And Police Accountability, Hilary Rau, Kim S. Buchanan, Monique L. Dixon, Phillip A. Goff 2021 University of California, Irvine School of Law

State Regulation Of Policing: Post Commissions And Police Accountability, Hilary Rau, Kim S. Buchanan, Monique L. Dixon, Phillip A. Goff

UC Irvine Law Review

This Article examines the untapped potential of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) commissions to protect communities that experience police misconduct and discrimination. POST commissions, which are created by state laws and exist in all fifty states, have broad authority to regulate police officers and police departments. POST commissions determine eligibility and qualifications for police employment and regulate the content of training officers receive. Most POST commissions can also revoke certification of officers who commit serious misconduct or fail to meet continuing eligibility requirements set by the commissions. In some states, they can also impose statewide, compulsory reforms to policing ...


Reimagining American Policing, Tom Tyler 2021 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Reimagining American Policing, Tom Tyler

UC Irvine Law Review

Current efforts at police reform focus on heightening the legal accountability of police officers when they engage in questionable behavior. While valuable, such reforms do not address the underlying problems in police organizations that lead to problems with the use of force. This paper highlights the desirability of shifting from a warrior culture, one built around gaining compliance through the threat or use of force, to a guardian- or service-oriented culture, one focused on gaining acceptance by building trust and confidence among people in the community. Beyond changing the dynamics of authority in police-civilian encounters, this new model of policing ...


Beyond Borders: How Principles Of Prison Abolition Can Shape The Future Of Immigration Reform, Anna Hales 2021 University of California, Irvine School of Law

Beyond Borders: How Principles Of Prison Abolition Can Shape The Future Of Immigration Reform, Anna Hales

UC Irvine Law Review

This Note presents prison abolition theory and discusses how principles of abolition can be applied in the context of immigration enforcement and reform. In doing so, this Note argues for an “open borders” approach to immigration, presents several viewpoints on what such a regime may look like, and discusses how this vision can shape immigration reform efforts. In applying abolition theory to the immigration legal system, this Note uses a framework of three tenets of prison abolition. First, the assumptions upon which our current system of immigration enforcement is based, such as public safety and economic justifications, are open to ...


Indiana Federal Court Rejects Public School Teacher’S Religious Discrimination Claim Over Misgendering Discharge, Arthur S. Leonard 2021 New York Law School

Indiana Federal Court Rejects Public School Teacher’S Religious Discrimination Claim Over Misgendering Discharge, Arthur S. Leonard

Other Publications

No abstract provided.


School Police Reform: A Public Health Imperative, Thalia González, Emma Kaeser 2021 Georgetown University Law Center

School Police Reform: A Public Health Imperative, Thalia González, Emma Kaeser

SMU Law Review Forum

Out of the twin pandemics currently gripping the United States­—deaths of unarmed Black victims at the hands of police and racialized health inequities resulting from COVID-19—an antiracist health equity agenda has emerged that identifies racism as a public health crisis. Likewise, calls for reform of school policing by those advocating for civil rights, racial justice, and Black Lives Matter have simultaneously intensified. Yet each remains siloed, despite the natural connection and implicit overlap between these separate movements and debates. Indeed, there are documented negative health effects of school policing for Black, Indigenous, people of color (BIPOC) youth. But ...


Court Rejects Web Designer’S Challenge To Colorado Anti-Discrimination Law, Arthur S. Leonard 2021 New York Law School

Court Rejects Web Designer’S Challenge To Colorado Anti-Discrimination Law, Arthur S. Leonard

Other Publications

No abstract provided.


Bostock Was Bogus: Textualism, Pluralism, And Title Vii, Mitchell N. Berman, Guha Krishnamurthi 2021 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Bostock Was Bogus: Textualism, Pluralism, And Title Vii, Mitchell N. Berman, Guha Krishnamurthi

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In Bostock v. Clayton County, one of the blockbuster cases from its 2019 Term, the Supreme Court held that federal antidiscrimination law prohibits employment discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity. Unsurprisingly, the result won wide acclaim in the mainstream legal and popular media. Results aside, however, the reaction to Justice Neil Gorsuch’s majority opinion, which purported to ground the outcome in a textualist approach to statutory interpretation, was more mixed. The great majority of commentators, both liberal and conservative, praised Gorsuch for what they deemed a careful and sophisticated—even “magnificent” and “exemplary”—application of textualist ...


The Powers Of The Inter-American Court Of Human Rights Towards The Implementation Of Gender Justice Laws At The National Level In South America, Kiana Therrien-Tomas Miss 2021 York University

The Powers Of The Inter-American Court Of Human Rights Towards The Implementation Of Gender Justice Laws At The National Level In South America, Kiana Therrien-Tomas Miss

Bridges: An Undergraduate Journal of Contemporary Connections

Although South America is earning international attention as an innovative global leader in various fields, it currently remains a nation steeped in traditional beliefs and practices. Despite prevailing laws against domestic violence, countless Latin American women proceed to be failed by the legal system. As South American society produces its own theory of gender justice, apprised by local realities and universally accepted norms, women's rights advocates and the Supreme Court can represent a decisive role in forming the discourse. Throughout this work, I aim to contemplate the powers of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACHR) towards the implementation ...


Scotus Denies Review To Florist Who Refused To Serve Same-Sex Couple, Arthur S. Leonard 2021 New York Law School

Scotus Denies Review To Florist Who Refused To Serve Same-Sex Couple, Arthur S. Leonard

Other Publications

No abstract provided.


A Roadmap To Revising Ethiopia’S Gender Discriminatory Laws: A Comparative Analysis, Rangita de Silva de Alwis 2021 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

A Roadmap To Revising Ethiopia’S Gender Discriminatory Laws: A Comparative Analysis, Rangita De Silva De Alwis

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Ethiopia is Africa's oldest independent country, the second-most populous nation in Africa, and one of the founding members of the Organization of African Unity (OAU), which was established on 25 May 1963 and replaced by the African Union (AU) in 2002. The headquarters of the AU is based in Addis Ababa. Today, Ethiopia has the largest GDP in East Africa and its economy is also one of the fastest growing economies in the world.

Ethiopia is one of the few countries in the world which had achieved gender parity in the cabinet, and where women hold the positions of ...


Co-Creating A Legal Check-Up In A School-Based Health Center Serving Low-Income Adolescents, Lisa Kessler, Yael Cannon, Nicole Tuchinda, Ana Caskin, Christina Balz Ndjatou, Vicki W. Girard, Deborah F. Perry 2021 Georgetown University Law Center

Co-Creating A Legal Check-Up In A School-Based Health Center Serving Low-Income Adolescents, Lisa Kessler, Yael Cannon, Nicole Tuchinda, Ana Caskin, Christina Balz Ndjatou, Vicki W. Girard, Deborah F. Perry

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The Problem: Marginalized populations experience health-harming legal needs—barriers to good health that require legal advocacy to overcome. Medical–legal partnerships (MLPs) embed lawyers into the healthcare team to resolve these issues, but identifying patients with health-harming legal needs is complex, and screening practices vary across MLPs.

Purpose of Article: Academic and community partners who collaborate in an MLP at a school-based health center (SBHC) share their process of co-creating a two-stage legal check-up for adolescents.

Key Points: Screening adolescents for health-harming legal needs is challenging. It took ongoing collaboration to refine the process to fit the needs of adolescents ...


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