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Tipping The Scales?: Maine Adopts The Continuing Negligent Treatment Doctrine In Baker V. Farrand, Michael P. Beers 2017 University of Maine School of Law

Tipping The Scales?: Maine Adopts The Continuing Negligent Treatment Doctrine In Baker V. Farrand, Michael P. Beers

Maine Law Review

In Baker v. Farrand, the Maine Supreme Judicial Court, sitting as the Law Court, held that for a series of related negligent acts or omissions committed by a health care provider or practitioner, a single cause of action “accrues” under the Maine Health Security Act (hereinafter MHSA) on the date of the last act or omission that contributed to the plaintiff’s injury. Hence, in situations where a physician provides continuing negligent treatment to a patient in which each and every one of the physician’s actions are negligent, the MHSA’s three-year statute of limitations does not begin to ...


Litigating Police Misconduct: Does The Litigation Process Matter? Does It Work?, 2017 Northwestern University School of Law

Litigating Police Misconduct: Does The Litigation Process Matter? Does It Work?

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

No abstract provided.


Restoring Bankruptcy’S Fresh Start, Jonathan S. Hermann 2017 Fordham University School of Law

Restoring Bankruptcy’S Fresh Start, Jonathan S. Hermann

Fordham Law Review

The discharge injunction, which allows former debtors to be free from any efforts to collect former debt, is a primary feature of bankruptcy law in the United States. When creditors have systemically violated debtors’ discharge injunctions, some debtors have attempted to challenge those creditors through a class action lawsuit in bankruptcy court. However, the pervasiveness of class-waiving arbitration clauses likely prevents those debtors from disputing discharge injunction violations outside of binding, individual arbitration. This Note first discusses areas of disagreement regarding how former debtors may enforce their discharge injunctions. Then, it examines the types of disputes that allow debtors to ...


Affirming Firm Sanctions: The Authority To Sanction Law Firms Under 28 U.S.C. § 1927, Vincent J. Margiotta 2017 Fordham University School of Law

Affirming Firm Sanctions: The Authority To Sanction Law Firms Under 28 U.S.C. § 1927, Vincent J. Margiotta

Fordham Law Review

A circuit split exists as to whether 28 U.S.C. § 1927 allows for an award of sanctions against nonattorneys or nonrepresentatives. Five federal courts of appeals—the Second, Third, Eighth, Eleventh, and the District of Columbia Circuits—hold that, to further the purpose of 28 U.S.C. § 1927, courts have the authority to sanction a law firm for the conduct of its attorneys, in addition to the authority to sanction individual officers of the court. The Sixth, Seventh, and Ninth Circuits disagree, concluding that the statute allows federal courts to sanction only individuals—“attorney[s] or other person ...


Confronting The Ghost: Legal Strategies To Oust Medical Ghostwriters, Deanna Minasi 2017 Fordham University School of Law

Confronting The Ghost: Legal Strategies To Oust Medical Ghostwriters, Deanna Minasi

Fordham Law Review

Articles published in medical journals contribute significantly to public health by disseminating medical information to physicians, thereby influencing prescribing practices. However, the information guiding treatment decisions becomes distorted by selective publishing and medical ghostwriting, which negatively affects overall patient care. Although there is general consensus in the medical community that these practices of publication bias represent a moral failing, the issue is rarely framed as a wrong that necessitates legal consequences. This Note takes the stance that medical ghostwriting constitutes an act prohibited under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) and argues that physicians fraudulently named as authors ...


Reinvigorating Commonality: Gender And Class Actions, Brooke D. Coleman, Elizabeth G. Porter 2017 University of Washington School of Law

Reinvigorating Commonality: Gender And Class Actions, Brooke D. Coleman, Elizabeth G. Porter

Articles

In this Article, we examine the interplay of Rule 23(b)(2) class actions, feminism, and Title VII sex discrimination doctrine over the past fifty years to show that the theoretical concept of commonality—cohesion, unity—in the women’s movement has had a significant impact on the ability of women to seek collective redress for workplace discrimination through class actions. We describe how the four "waves” of feminism since the 1960s find corresponding analogues in the development of Title VII class action law. Beginning in the civil rights era, feminism became an entrenched part of mainstream America Over time ...


The Flsa Permission Slip: Determining Whether Flsa Settlements And Voluntary Dismissals Require Approval, Alex Lau 2017 Fordham University School of Law

The Flsa Permission Slip: Determining Whether Flsa Settlements And Voluntary Dismissals Require Approval, Alex Lau

Fordham Law Review

The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA) seeks to protect the poorest, most vulnerable workers by requiring that they be paid a minimum wage and compensated for their overtime labor. When employers do not pay their workers minimum wage or overtime compensation and thereby violate the FLSA, workers have the power to sue their employers for remuneration. Like many other types of cases, most FLSA cases settle before going to trial. Unlike those other types of cases, however, most courts have held that settlements of FLSA cases must be approved to be enforceable. Even though Federal Rule of Civil ...


In Re Petrobras Securities Litigation: Validade E AbrangêNcia Da CláUsula Arbitral, Bruno Meyerhof Salama 2017 FGV Law School in Sao Paulo

In Re Petrobras Securities Litigation: Validade E AbrangêNcia Da CláUsula Arbitral, Bruno Meyerhof Salama

Bruno Meyerhof Salama

O caso In Re Petrobras Securities Litigation envolve investidores da Petrobras que adquiriram securities tanto no Brasil quanto nos Estados Unidos e que ajuizaram uma class action em uma Corte americana. A Petrobras buscou afastar da jurisdição americana com uma discussão sobre a validade e abrangência da cláusula arbitral presente em seu Estatuto Social. Este trabalho explica os argumentos utilizados por cada uma das partes e esclarece a decisão proferida pela Corte americana. Ao final, são apresentadas algumas das implicações e dúvidas relevantes para empresas brasileiras emissoras de securities nos ...


El Derecho De Acceso A La Justicia Civil En Chile., Ricardo Lillo, Macarena Vargas 2017 Universidad Diego Portales

El Derecho De Acceso A La Justicia Civil En Chile., Ricardo Lillo, Macarena Vargas

Ricardo Lillo

El acceso a la justicia es un derecho fundamental que exige a los Estados garantizar que todos los ciudadanos que así lo requieran puedan recurrir al sistema de justicia y obtener una respuesta efectiva a una necesidad legal, normalmente asociada a la resolución de un conflicto o disputa de relevancia jurídica. Sin embargo, en nuestro país, por razones de diversa índole, una serie de asuntos de alta prevalencia entre la población, y que potencialmente no deberían representar mayor complejidad para el sistema, no logran ser conocidos por parte de la justicia ordinaria. Ello representa ...


Rethinking Judicial Review Of High Volume Agency Adjudication, Jonah B. Gelbach, David Marcus 2017 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Rethinking Judicial Review Of High Volume Agency Adjudication, Jonah B. Gelbach, David Marcus

Faculty Scholarship

Article III courts annually review thousands of decisions rendered by Social Security Administrative Law Judges, Immigration Judges, and other agency adjudicators who decide large numbers of cases in short periods of time. Federal judges can provide a claim for disability benefits or for immigration relief the sort of consideration that an agency buckling under the strain of enormous caseloads cannot. Judicial review thus seems to help legitimize systems of high volume agency adjudication. Even so, influential studies rooted in the gritty realities of this decision-making have concluded that the costs of judicial review outweigh whatever benefits the process creates.

We ...


The Dangers Of E-Discovery And The New Federal Rules Of Civil Procedure, Ryan J. Reeves 2017 University of Oklahoma College of Law

The Dangers Of E-Discovery And The New Federal Rules Of Civil Procedure, Ryan J. Reeves

Oklahoma Journal of Law and Technology

No abstract provided.


Lewis V. Clarke, Summer L. Carmack 2017 Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana

Lewis V. Clarke, Summer L. Carmack

Public Land and Resources Law Review

One manner in which Indian tribes exercise their inherent sovereignty is by asserting sovereign immunity. In Lewis v. Clarke, the Court decided that the sovereign immunity extended to instrumentalities of tribes did not further extend to tribal employees acting within the scope of their employment. The Court acknowledged the concerns of the lower court, namely, the possibility of setting a precedent allowing future plaintiffs to sidestep a tribe’s sovereign immunity by suing a tribal employee in his individual capacity. However, the Supreme Court ultimately felt that the immunity of tribal employees should not exceed the immunity extended to state ...


Collective Action And Class Action, Sam Issacharoff 2017 NYU Law School

Collective Action And Class Action, Sam Issacharoff

New York University Public Law and Legal Theory Working Papers

Over the past 25 years, class actions have emerged as a central feature of Canadian law. The conceptual heart of these class actions comes from the Ontario Law Reform Commission’s 1982 Report on Class Actions, particularly in common law Canada.[1] Drawing on the experiences of the early-adopter provinces of Québec, Ontario and British Columbia, the Report set out the objectives of the modern class action: judicial economy, access to justice, and behavior modification.

The reasoning in the Ontario Report as insufficient to explain the need for class actions. The stated premises are all classic accounts of the lack ...


Civil Procedure: Certifying An Opt-In Class Under Rule 23, Scott Dodson 2017 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Civil Procedure: Certifying An Opt-In Class Under Rule 23, Scott Dodson

The Judges' Book

No abstract provided.


Civil Procedure: How To Apply Diversity Jurisdiction In A Multiparty Case, Scott Dodson 2017 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Civil Procedure: How To Apply Diversity Jurisdiction In A Multiparty Case, Scott Dodson

The Judges' Book

No abstract provided.


Civil Procedure: Class Action Fee And Cost Awards, Morris Ratner 2017 University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Civil Procedure: Class Action Fee And Cost Awards, Morris Ratner

The Judges' Book

No abstract provided.


Milky Whey, Inc. V. Dairy Partners, Llc: Transacting Business Under Montana’S Long-Arm Statute To The Full Constitutional Limit, Victoria Dettman 2017 J.D. Student, University of Montana, Alexander Blewett III School of Law

Milky Whey, Inc. V. Dairy Partners, Llc: Transacting Business Under Montana’S Long-Arm Statute To The Full Constitutional Limit, Victoria Dettman

Montana Law Review

Milky Whey, Inc. v. Dairy Partners, LLC: Transacting Business Under Montana’s Long-Arm Statute to the Full Constitutional Limit


Discovering Forensic Fraud, Jennifer D. Oliva, Valena E. Beety 2017 West Virginia University

Discovering Forensic Fraud, Jennifer D. Oliva, Valena E. Beety

Northwestern University Law Review

This Essay posits that certain structural dynamics, which dominate criminal proceedings, significantly contribute to the admissibility of faulty forensic science in criminal trials. The authors believe that these dynamics are more insidious than questionable individual prosecutorial or judicial behavior in this context. Not only are judges likely to be former prosecutors, prosecutors are “repeat players” in criminal litigation and, as such, routinely support reduced pretrial protections for defendants. Therefore, we argue that the significant discrepancies between the civil and criminal pretrial discovery and disclosure rules warrant additional scrutiny.

In the criminal system, the near absence of any pretrial discovery means ...


Acciones De Clase, “Microdaños” A Los Consumidores Y Fluid Recovery: Alternativas Institucionales Y Costos Sociales, Pamela Tolosa 2017 ALACDE

Acciones De Clase, “Microdaños” A Los Consumidores Y Fluid Recovery: Alternativas Institucionales Y Costos Sociales, Pamela Tolosa

The Latin American and Iberian Journal of Law and Economics

Usually, class actions have advantages in dealing with negative expected-value claims by consumers —when the expected cost of claiming exceeds the expected benefits of doing so—. In those cases, it is assumed that affected consumers do not have incentives to sue. Consequently, class action can be seen as a device to internalize the social costs of harms caused to consumers. Nevertheless, in order to achieve such a goal, the condemnatory sentence or the settlement agreement must be effectively enforced. In that stage of proceedings, the lack of incentives for claiming consumer damages is frequent. Fluid recovery or cy prés mechanims ...


Parochial Procedure, Maggie Gardner 2017 Cornell Law School

Parochial Procedure, Maggie Gardner

Maggie Gardner

The federal courts are often accused of being too parochial, favoring U.S. parties over foreigners and U.S. law over relevant foreign or international law. According to what this Article terms the “parochial critique,” the courts’ U.S.-centrism generates unnecessary friction with allies, regulatory conflict, and access-to-justice gaps. This parochialism is assumed to reflect the preferences of individual judges: persuade judges to like international law and transnational cases better, the standard story goes, and the courts will reach more cosmopolitan results.

This Article challenges that assumption. I argue instead that parochial doctrines can develop even in the absence ...


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